A kit

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1/28/2019 7:38 AM

As a fast intermediate rider, would buying A kit suspension on a YZ250F be worth it?

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1/28/2019 7:44 AM
Edited Date/Time: 1/29/2019 10:04 AM

Have you got them set-up by Race Tech or someone first? I would think that would make a huge difference, you don't really need A-Kit stuff till you're blowing people out of the water in A class races.

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1/28/2019 7:48 AM

Keefer said something along the lines of average guys have no need for A-Kit suspension.If you are a super fast intermediate and have the money to blow, then I guess why not. If you don't really have the extra money to drop, I wouldn't bother.

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2017 RMZ450
2005 YZ250-sold :,(
1998 YZ250
2005 KX250F

80% of the time it works every time
IG @hammerfamily_4 & @2HRacing
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1/28/2019 7:58 AM

Depends what bike you have. I think kit suspension or upgrading to KYB/Showa on KTM and Husky are worth it for any level rider.

The new Yamaha and Honda are very good out of the box. Maybe just a revalve on those or correct springs can get those perfect!

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1/28/2019 7:59 AM
Edited Date/Time: 1/28/2019 8:00 AM

The stock stuff on the Yamaha can be set up real good. Good enough that I would say no. I bought CV forks for a 17 KX450 not because my riding ability warranted them but because the SSF TAC forks were so bad and I got a good deal. If I had a Yamaha, I wouldn't have needed them.

Spend some time and money setting up your stock stuff and you'll be happy.

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1/28/2019 9:00 AM

My personal opinion: If you can afford it, it is always worth it. It's the "Oh shit" moments, when decent suspension really shines and saves your ass from a trip to ER.

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1/28/2019 9:04 AM

Suspension is never a bad place to spend money. If its something you can easily afford I say go for it. But if you're scraping to have new new tires and stuff and never service your suspension then just a good revalve and service might be a better way to go.

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1/28/2019 9:31 AM

A little lunch break thinking Photo

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1/28/2019 9:42 AM

Zesiger 112 wrote:

A little lunch break thinking Photo

According to this flow chart, I was justified in my decision to buy a kit. Can’t wait to show my wife the scientific data!

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1/28/2019 10:23 AM

I agree with Turbo. I am 60+ and do well when I decide to race. I CAN feel the difference and when the 'OH SHIT' moment happened in the past, it has kept me out of the ER. I have a buddy similar in age that rides an 18 CRF450. When he rides my bike (same) he loves how plush and controlled the bottoming is. He has his suspension revalved and sprung by a very reputable tuner and still prefers my kit suspension. Just a little info to share, setup of akit is imperative to get the true benefits.

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1/28/2019 10:27 AM

Zesiger 112 wrote:

A little lunch break thinking Photo

How was that supreme dinner, bud?

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1/28/2019 10:40 AM

If you have the money, its a great investment. That said, even Akit suspension that is not set up personally for YOU will not be beneficial for YOU. The most important part of suspension is having it tailored specifically for you, your riding skill level, and the type of riding you are doing. No disrespect to the big suspension companies, but you can get perfectly tailored suspension using the stock stuff on all modern motocross bikes by ensuring you have the proper spring rates front/rear and by dialing in the shim stacks and fork oil level.

I suggest you learn how suspension works, and what changes are required to get the feeling you are looking for. Then, get the tools you need and tackle it yourself. Chances are you'll be able to get the feel you are looking for.

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1/28/2019 10:45 AM

Lucas_Maestro wrote:

As a fast intermediate rider, would buying A kit suspension on a YZ250F be worth it?

Send your susp to ENZO, they will get you setup for a fraction of the price.

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Non Gratum Anus Rodentum

1/28/2019 10:47 AM

theycallmeebryan wrote:

If you have the money, its a great investment. That said, even Akit suspension that is not set up personally for YOU will not be beneficial for YOU. The most important part of suspension is having it tailored specifically for you, your riding skill level, and the type of riding you are doing. No disrespect to the big suspension companies, but you can get perfectly tailored suspension using the stock stuff on all modern motocross bikes by ensuring you have the proper spring rates front/rear and by dialing in the shim stacks and fork oil level.

I suggest you learn how suspension works, and what changes are required to get the feeling you are looking for. Then, get the tools you need and tackle it yourself. Chances are you'll be able to get the feel you are looking for.

Some excellent advice right there.

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Non Gratum Anus Rodentum

1/28/2019 11:06 AM

As a side note, I never would have believed at my age and speed, I would be able to feel the planted , stable feel of the forks over stock components. The tolerances of stock forks are visible on a slow speed video and you can see the difference akit makes in this area. I have used my forks on 4 bikes now and can sell them and it will cost less than the revalves on 4 different sets of forks. JMO

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1/28/2019 11:18 AM

cmotodad wrote:

I agree with Turbo. I am 60+ and do well when I decide to race. I CAN feel the difference and when the 'OH SHIT' moment happened in the past, it has kept me out of the ER. I have a buddy similar in age that rides an 18 CRF450. When he rides my bike (same) he loves how plush and controlled the bottoming is. He has his suspension revalved and sprung by a very reputable tuner and still prefers my kit suspension. Just a little info to share, setup of akit is imperative to get the true benefits.

What brand kit, and who set it up?

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1/28/2019 11:18 AM

Let me preface this by stating that I have never been a pro. I did, however, rise up the ranks to 125 intermediate here in SoCal back in the day, and that was a pretty tough class with fast guys. I was able to ride some bikes with Enzo suspension on them after coming up through the ranks and it was then that I could appreciate it.
After running a revalved suspension system for a while myself, it became apparent to me that I could rely on it to use all my skill, instead of having to back off the tiniest bit in some situations. I don't feel like even better suspension would have made me faster, but I bet that if I had gotten faster, I could utilize the better suspension. Does that make sense?
At some point, it became important to run the revalved stuff, because stock would have been dangerous. I imagine it's the same for the pros; "A"-kit product is probably necessary because simply revalving stock would be noticeably poorer-performing and possibly dangerous.

The takeaway? If you are significantly fast (Pro-level, could qualify for a national or could win Loretta's in A,) go for it. If not, maybe it's not necessary.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

1/28/2019 1:36 PM
Edited Date/Time: 1/28/2019 1:38 PM

I have some Showa Akit, not PC, and it was setup by Graeme Brough for me when I purchased it. I was lucky to get a shock for the rear of my 17 CRF450 too. I guess I look at it is a confidence and insurance mindset.

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1/28/2019 2:01 PM
Edited Date/Time: 1/28/2019 4:21 PM

Falcon wrote:

Let me preface this by stating that I have never been a pro. I did, however, rise up the ranks to 125 intermediate here in SoCal back in the day, and that was a pretty tough class with fast guys. I was able to ride some bikes with Enzo suspension on them after coming up through the ranks and it was then that I could appreciate it.
After running a revalved suspension system for a while myself, it became apparent to me that I could rely on it to use all my skill, instead of having to back off the tiniest bit in some situations. I don't feel like even better suspension would have made me faster, but I bet that if I had gotten faster, I could utilize the better suspension. Does that make sense?
At some point, it became important to run the revalved stuff, because stock would have been dangerous. I imagine it's the same for the pros; "A"-kit product is probably necessary because simply revalving stock would be noticeably poorer-performing and possibly dangerous.

The takeaway? If you are significantly fast (Pro-level, could qualify for a national or could win Loretta's in A,) go for it. If not, maybe it's not necessary.

I couldn't agree more. This guy gets it.
OP save your money. The modern Showa & KYB suspension is very good. If need be a revalve / respring can be done to accomodate speed, skill etc..

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Speak softly and carry a big stick.

1/28/2019 2:09 PM

Spend a few bucks to set up your stock stuff and you'll be 90% of the way there.

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1/28/2019 3:20 PM
Edited Date/Time: 1/28/2019 3:22 PM

Just curious, have you ridden long term with well setup Akit?

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1/28/2019 9:03 PM

Lucas_Maestro wrote:

As a fast intermediate rider, would buying A kit suspension on a YZ250F be worth it?

You have a great production fork and shock. I'd get it setup for you and call it good... though if you have a big budget, the mental bump and serious bling is always awesome... but you still need to get it setup for you or you're tossing your money away.

Food for thought, plenty of top 10's, top 5's and even the podium have been made in Supercross on production Suspension modified.

You can't get more strenuous circumstances and needs than that... production stuff is REALLY good these days and it comes down to spring rates and valving setup.

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1/28/2019 9:20 PM

cmotodad wrote:

I have some Showa Akit, not PC, and it was setup by Graeme Brough for me when I purchased it. I was lucky to get a shock for the rear of my 17 CRF450 too. I guess I look at it is a confidence and insurance mindset.

Graeme Brough is a first class suspension guy. I had the privilege of working under him many years back and he still helps us out with Spec via Skype/email etc. Grazza is based in the Mission Viejo area. A great guy and is always keen to help out.

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Non Gratum Anus Rodentum

1/28/2019 9:36 PM

Zesiger 112 wrote:

A little lunch break thinking Photo

Haha....brother , this is priceless!! laughing laughing

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1/29/2019 12:01 AM

Springs and valving, of course. But don't forget shock bumpers and fork bottoming cones (in some cases, spring seats). They come into play much sooner than most realize. Also, fork oil level. Getting the front and back to work together (or at least not work against) during that last 15% of travel can make a huge difference in the how the bike will feel when in this area of travel. It's not very confident inspiring when you feel like being tossed over the bars when hard landing from some jump. It's the entire "system" that either works or doesn't, not just springs and damping.

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Retired Mechanical Engineer, published technical writer, mscperformance.com, Bisimotoengineering.com,

1/29/2019 12:23 AM

Zesiger 112 wrote:

A little lunch break thinking Photo

That is 100% correct,

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@TONY351KTM

1/29/2019 5:13 AM

Lucas_Maestro wrote:

As a fast intermediate rider, would buying A kit suspension on a YZ250F be worth it?

I’m kind of thinking you need to spend 7K on KYB Kit suspension. It does not take a rocket scientist to figure this out

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1/29/2019 5:19 AM

At that level just buy gas and tires.. Wear the bike out and buy another bike then by then you will need suspension..

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1/29/2019 7:08 AM
Edited Date/Time: 1/29/2019 7:12 AM

Are the KYB, Ohlins or Dal Soggio cartridges considered A kit or B++? (when slid into stock tubes)

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1/29/2019 11:43 AM

In my last racing season the difference in my YZf 450 forks after racetech revalve was night and day.
So noticable even for a c class squid like me.
Plush and the bottoming resistance, The rear shock was hardly noticable.

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