Triple Clamp brands

layenpipe25
Posts
40
Joined
2/12/2019
Location
Simi Valley, CA US
3/20/2019 2:27pm
Who makes a good set of triple clamps these days for a reasonable price? Other than changing offset are there any added benefits?
|
Rickyisms
Posts
3235
Joined
10/5/2017
Location
FL US
3/20/2019 2:37pm
I have bud racing clamps. I like them. Luxon makes a beautiful set of clamps.
2
3/20/2019 2:54pm
Ride Engineering, X-Trig, Applied, Neken. Those are what I can think of off the top of my head
1
layenpipe25
Posts
40
Joined
2/12/2019
Location
Simi Valley, CA US
3/20/2019 5:15pm
Ride Engineering, X-Trig, Applied, Neken. Those are what I can think of off the top of my head
The Neken and X-trig look like the cream of the crop but the price is more than I would like to spend. Any from that list that I should lean towards over the others? How about RG3?
layenpipe25
Posts
40
Joined
2/12/2019
Location
Simi Valley, CA US
3/20/2019 5:16pm
Rickyisms wrote:
I have bud racing clamps. I like them. Luxon makes a beautiful set of clamps.
I thought this was a beer joke. I have never heard of Bud racing clamps... I will check them out.

The Shop

FiendzCC
Posts
305
Joined
9/12/2017
Location
Murrieta, CA US
3/20/2019 5:27pm
+1 for Luxon MX
2
Luxon MX
Posts
829
Joined
11/6/2017
Location
San Diego, CA US
3/20/2019 6:22pm Edited Date/Time 3/20/2019 6:29pm
Who makes a good set of triple clamps these days for a reasonable price? Other than changing offset are there any added benefits?
What bike are they for? What would you like different from your stock clamps?

There are a lot of Triple clamp options out there: Xtrig, Neken, Ride Engineering, DP Racing, Bud, Pro Circuit, Applied, BRP, Scar, Kite, probably some I'm forgetting, and of course Luxon. Some offer nothing more than bling (color anodized), others offer that plus various other features. Some main considerations in a clamp:

Strength
Really not an issue these days. A well designed set of clamps will be plenty strong assuming they've hit a reasonable stiffness target. If a particular manufacturer's clamps aren't strong enough, you'd hear about it quickly, in here or elsewhere. In most cases, a broken set of clamps is the result of a major get-off, huge case, etc. This isn't necessarily true for bar mounts, though. More on that below.

Weight
Clamps should be as light as possible given that they're strong and stiff enough. Often times aftermarket clamps are about the same weigh as stock or heavier. If they're lighter, they typically give something up to get there, most notably stiffness.

Stiffness
For most people this is the least understood aspect in clamps by far. It's rare that riders, testers, the media, or anyone really truly understands it and it's clear from how they describe it (or typically don't adequately describe it). Most aftermarket companies will tell you they've "optimized stiffness" or have "optimal flex characteristics" or some other such nonsense. They never tell you what changed (more or less stiff? And in which conditions - torsion, bump, lateral, longitudinal? How is it optimal?).

The key to stiffness in clamp design is: maximizing vertical stiffness (bump) so the forks don't deflect and bind, maximizing torsional stiffness for steering precision and feel, and maintaining suitable flex longitudinally to help absorb bumps and vibrations. All these stiffness goals conflict with one another and are further compromised by compliance in the bar mounts as that has a major influence on feel as well. And it's important to note that stiffer clamps sometimes feels more plush to the rider as it allows the forks to work better than a flexy clamp that causes them to bind. Beyond that, you can't listen to someone who's tested clamps and noted on their stiffness without understanding the rest of their bike setup. Everything flexes - wheels, tires, forks, clamps, bars, chassis, axles, etc. If they've got some stiff A60 rims, a-kit forks, different tires, or anything else, it's all going to have an effect. If you want to understand the effects of clamp stiffness it really needs to be a back to back test on the same bike with a similar setup as yours.

Bar Mounts
Are the bar mounts the same as stock? Rubber mounted or solid? Some new "improved" design or same as stock? Do they fix a problem that the stock ones have; often twisting (most all rubber mounts) or bending (all current stock KTM/Husky mounts)? The key to a good bar mount design is having one that doesn't twist or bend from a minor crash, yet absorbs vibrations and bumps nicely. And it shouldn't weigh a ton! For example, the Xtrig mounts perform quite well, but they're nearly twice the weight of similar performing mounts.

Additional Features
Often times, aftermarket clamps are nothing more than machined copies of stock, with some very minor differences, and anodized to look nice. Pro Circuit is a great example of this. Nothing stands out about the design, they're on par with strength, stiffness, and weight of stock but with no extra features. But of course they have the cool factor because of the name... Lots of brands are similar to this, with only a few offering a unique design/advantage. Some are again similar to stock in design, but thinned up throughout so they're lighter. The downside of this is that they're flexy, which is rarely desirable.

Notable standouts with additional features are Xtrig (split fork tube clamp design, some offer adjustable offset, nice bar mounts, but otherwise very similar to stock and rather heavy), Neken (the air/spring bar mount versions - similar to stock otherwise and heavy due to the mounts), and Luxon (strong rubber mounted bar mounts with a topology optimized design, much different than stock - typically lighter stiffer and stronger than stock, but that's bike dependent).

Price
If you're looking for something that hits the mark on all the above points, it's not going to be cheap. Expect to pay on the order of $800 for a nice set of clamps with bar mounts. If you're just looking for anodized bling, you can probably find a set for something like $500 with bar mounts, or cheaper if they use the stock bar mounts. But why spend the money unless you can get some real performance benefit?

Obviously the Luxon clamps are the best available (we may be a bit biased though Laughing )! But really the best clamps are dependent on what bike you're putting them on, what features you're looking for, what trade-offs you're willing to make (stiffness, weight, bar mounts, etc.), and how much you can afford to spend. If you can provide more details I and/or other Vital members can point you in the right direction.


Edit: All that and I forgot to address the offset!

Offset can have a significant effect on handling. It's very bike dependent and these days the manufacturers have gotten it pretty close with their stock clamps. That said, it can still be an advantage to change it in some cases. Again, it's heavily rider, style of riding (moto, off-road, etc.), track condition, and bike dependent. Few people are going to buy multiple sets of clamps with different offsets and change them depending on what they're riding that day. Even the adjustable offset clamps like Xtrig are rarely touched once a rider finds the offset they like. As I said earlier, the manufacturers have done a pretty good job finding out what the right "happy medium" offset is for most people and most riding. You'll probably only want to change offset if you're doing something rather different from the norm.
BobPA
Posts
7575
Joined
10/31/2013
Location
PA US
3/20/2019 6:32pm
Who makes a good set of triple clamps these days for a reasonable price? Other than changing offset are there any added benefits?
Luxon MX wrote:
What bike are they for? What would you like different from your stock clamps? There are a lot of Triple clamp options out there: Xtrig, Neken...
What bike are they for? What would you like different from your stock clamps?

There are a lot of Triple clamp options out there: Xtrig, Neken, Ride Engineering, DP Racing, Bud, Pro Circuit, Applied, BRP, Scar, Kite, probably some I'm forgetting, and of course Luxon. Some offer nothing more than bling (color anodized), others offer that plus various other features. Some main considerations in a clamp:

Strength
Really not an issue these days. A well designed set of clamps will be plenty strong assuming they've hit a reasonable stiffness target. If a particular manufacturer's clamps aren't strong enough, you'd hear about it quickly, in here or elsewhere. In most cases, a broken set of clamps is the result of a major get-off, huge case, etc. This isn't necessarily true for bar mounts, though. More on that below.

Weight
Clamps should be as light as possible given that they're strong and stiff enough. Often times aftermarket clamps are about the same weigh as stock or heavier. If they're lighter, they typically give something up to get there, most notably stiffness.

Stiffness
For most people this is the least understood aspect in clamps by far. It's rare that riders, testers, the media, or anyone really truly understands it and it's clear from how they describe it (or typically don't adequately describe it). Most aftermarket companies will tell you they've "optimized stiffness" or have "optimal flex characteristics" or some other such nonsense. They never tell you what changed (more or less stiff? And in which conditions - torsion, bump, lateral, longitudinal? How is it optimal?).

The key to stiffness in clamp design is: maximizing vertical stiffness (bump) so the forks don't deflect and bind, maximizing torsional stiffness for steering precision and feel, and maintaining suitable flex longitudinally to help absorb bumps and vibrations. All these stiffness goals conflict with one another and are further compromised by compliance in the bar mounts as that has a major influence on feel as well. And it's important to note that stiffer clamps sometimes feels more plush to the rider as it allows the forks to work better than a flexy clamp that causes them to bind. Beyond that, you can't listen to someone who's tested clamps and noted on their stiffness without understanding the rest of their bike setup. Everything flexes - wheels, tires, forks, clamps, bars, chassis, axles, etc. If they've got some stiff A60 rims, a-kit forks, different tires, or anything else, it's all going to have an effect. If you want to understand the effects of clamp stiffness it really needs to be a back to back test on the same bike with a similar setup as yours.

Bar Mounts
Are the bar mounts the same as stock? Rubber mounted or solid? Some new "improved" design or same as stock? Do they fix a problem that the stock ones have; often twisting (most all rubber mounts) or bending (all current stock KTM/Husky mounts)? The key to a good bar mount design is having one that doesn't twist or bend from a minor crash, yet absorbs vibrations and bumps nicely. And it shouldn't weigh a ton! For example, the Xtrig mounts perform quite well, but they're nearly twice the weight of similar performing mounts.

Additional Features
Often times, aftermarket clamps are nothing more than machined copies of stock, with some very minor differences, and anodized to look nice. Pro Circuit is a great example of this. Nothing stands out about the design, they're on par with strength, stiffness, and weight of stock but with no extra features. But of course they have the cool factor because of the name... Lots of brands are similar to this, with only a few offering a unique design/advantage. Some are again similar to stock in design, but thinned up throughout so they're lighter. The downside of this is that they're flexy, which is rarely desirable.

Notable standouts with additional features are Xtrig (split fork tube clamp design, some offer adjustable offset, nice bar mounts, but otherwise very similar to stock and rather heavy), Neken (the air/spring bar mount versions - similar to stock otherwise and heavy due to the mounts), and Luxon (strong rubber mounted bar mounts with a topology optimized design, much different than stock - typically lighter stiffer and stronger than stock, but that's bike dependent).

Price
If you're looking for something that hits the mark on all the above points, it's not going to be cheap. Expect to pay on the order of $800 for a nice set of clamps with bar mounts. If you're just looking for anodized bling, you can probably find a set for something like $500 with bar mounts, or cheaper if they use the stock bar mounts. But why spend the money unless you can get some real performance benefit?

Obviously the Luxon clamps are the best available (we may be a bit biased though Laughing )! But really the best clamps are dependent on what bike you're putting them on, what features you're looking for, what trade-offs you're willing to make (stiffness, weight, bar mounts, etc.), and how much you can afford to spend. If you can provide more details I and/or other Vital members can point you in the right direction.


Edit: All that and I forgot to address the offset!

Offset can have a significant effect on handling. It's very bike dependent and these days the manufacturers have gotten it pretty close with their stock clamps. That said, it can still be an advantage to change it in some cases. Again, it's heavily rider, style of riding (moto, off-road, etc.), track condition, and bike dependent. Few people are going to buy multiple sets of clamps with different offsets and change them depending on what they're riding that day. Even the adjustable offset clamps like Xtrig are rarely touched once a rider finds the offset they like. As I said earlier, the manufacturers have done a pretty good job finding out what the right "happy medium" offset is for most people and most riding. You'll probably only want to change offset if you're doing something rather different from the norm.
Excellent post
4
T-Fish
Posts
2668
Joined
12/14/2009
Location
Sparta, WI US
3/20/2019 10:05pm
Who makes a good set of triple clamps these days for a reasonable price? Other than changing offset are there any added benefits?
Luxon MX wrote:
What bike are they for? What would you like different from your stock clamps? There are a lot of Triple clamp options out there: Xtrig, Neken...
What bike are they for? What would you like different from your stock clamps?

There are a lot of Triple clamp options out there: Xtrig, Neken, Ride Engineering, DP Racing, Bud, Pro Circuit, Applied, BRP, Scar, Kite, probably some I'm forgetting, and of course Luxon. Some offer nothing more than bling (color anodized), others offer that plus various other features. Some main considerations in a clamp:

Strength
Really not an issue these days. A well designed set of clamps will be plenty strong assuming they've hit a reasonable stiffness target. If a particular manufacturer's clamps aren't strong enough, you'd hear about it quickly, in here or elsewhere. In most cases, a broken set of clamps is the result of a major get-off, huge case, etc. This isn't necessarily true for bar mounts, though. More on that below.

Weight
Clamps should be as light as possible given that they're strong and stiff enough. Often times aftermarket clamps are about the same weigh as stock or heavier. If they're lighter, they typically give something up to get there, most notably stiffness.

Stiffness
For most people this is the least understood aspect in clamps by far. It's rare that riders, testers, the media, or anyone really truly understands it and it's clear from how they describe it (or typically don't adequately describe it). Most aftermarket companies will tell you they've "optimized stiffness" or have "optimal flex characteristics" or some other such nonsense. They never tell you what changed (more or less stiff? And in which conditions - torsion, bump, lateral, longitudinal? How is it optimal?).

The key to stiffness in clamp design is: maximizing vertical stiffness (bump) so the forks don't deflect and bind, maximizing torsional stiffness for steering precision and feel, and maintaining suitable flex longitudinally to help absorb bumps and vibrations. All these stiffness goals conflict with one another and are further compromised by compliance in the bar mounts as that has a major influence on feel as well. And it's important to note that stiffer clamps sometimes feels more plush to the rider as it allows the forks to work better than a flexy clamp that causes them to bind. Beyond that, you can't listen to someone who's tested clamps and noted on their stiffness without understanding the rest of their bike setup. Everything flexes - wheels, tires, forks, clamps, bars, chassis, axles, etc. If they've got some stiff A60 rims, a-kit forks, different tires, or anything else, it's all going to have an effect. If you want to understand the effects of clamp stiffness it really needs to be a back to back test on the same bike with a similar setup as yours.

Bar Mounts
Are the bar mounts the same as stock? Rubber mounted or solid? Some new "improved" design or same as stock? Do they fix a problem that the stock ones have; often twisting (most all rubber mounts) or bending (all current stock KTM/Husky mounts)? The key to a good bar mount design is having one that doesn't twist or bend from a minor crash, yet absorbs vibrations and bumps nicely. And it shouldn't weigh a ton! For example, the Xtrig mounts perform quite well, but they're nearly twice the weight of similar performing mounts.

Additional Features
Often times, aftermarket clamps are nothing more than machined copies of stock, with some very minor differences, and anodized to look nice. Pro Circuit is a great example of this. Nothing stands out about the design, they're on par with strength, stiffness, and weight of stock but with no extra features. But of course they have the cool factor because of the name... Lots of brands are similar to this, with only a few offering a unique design/advantage. Some are again similar to stock in design, but thinned up throughout so they're lighter. The downside of this is that they're flexy, which is rarely desirable.

Notable standouts with additional features are Xtrig (split fork tube clamp design, some offer adjustable offset, nice bar mounts, but otherwise very similar to stock and rather heavy), Neken (the air/spring bar mount versions - similar to stock otherwise and heavy due to the mounts), and Luxon (strong rubber mounted bar mounts with a topology optimized design, much different than stock - typically lighter stiffer and stronger than stock, but that's bike dependent).

Price
If you're looking for something that hits the mark on all the above points, it's not going to be cheap. Expect to pay on the order of $800 for a nice set of clamps with bar mounts. If you're just looking for anodized bling, you can probably find a set for something like $500 with bar mounts, or cheaper if they use the stock bar mounts. But why spend the money unless you can get some real performance benefit?

Obviously the Luxon clamps are the best available (we may be a bit biased though Laughing )! But really the best clamps are dependent on what bike you're putting them on, what features you're looking for, what trade-offs you're willing to make (stiffness, weight, bar mounts, etc.), and how much you can afford to spend. If you can provide more details I and/or other Vital members can point you in the right direction.


Edit: All that and I forgot to address the offset!

Offset can have a significant effect on handling. It's very bike dependent and these days the manufacturers have gotten it pretty close with their stock clamps. That said, it can still be an advantage to change it in some cases. Again, it's heavily rider, style of riding (moto, off-road, etc.), track condition, and bike dependent. Few people are going to buy multiple sets of clamps with different offsets and change them depending on what they're riding that day. Even the adjustable offset clamps like Xtrig are rarely touched once a rider finds the offset they like. As I said earlier, the manufacturers have done a pretty good job finding out what the right "happy medium" offset is for most people and most riding. You'll probably only want to change offset if you're doing something rather different from the norm.
Know what I like about this post? He had a golden opportunity to promote his clamps as the best thing since sliced bread, and he didn’t. He made an extremely thoughtful post filled with excellent advice. Very refreshing.
Yeti365
Posts
236
Joined
9/11/2018
Location
Chula Vista, CA US
3/21/2019 1:38am
I had ride engineering on my yzf. Applied all before that.

Gonna give xtrig a shot on my next bike.
3/21/2019 6:41am
I just made a topic recently about BRP having a 4 post bar mount top triple clamp. I really believe in the thing. Rode with it over the weekend, highly satisfied. $250.
layenpipe25
Posts
40
Joined
2/12/2019
Location
Simi Valley, CA US
3/21/2019 3:40pm
Who makes a good set of triple clamps these days for a reasonable price? Other than changing offset are there any added benefits?
Luxon MX wrote:
What bike are they for? What would you like different from your stock clamps? There are a lot of Triple clamp options out there: Xtrig, Neken...
What bike are they for? What would you like different from your stock clamps?

There are a lot of Triple clamp options out there: Xtrig, Neken, Ride Engineering, DP Racing, Bud, Pro Circuit, Applied, BRP, Scar, Kite, probably some I'm forgetting, and of course Luxon. Some offer nothing more than bling (color anodized), others offer that plus various other features. Some main considerations in a clamp:

Strength
Really not an issue these days. A well designed set of clamps will be plenty strong assuming they've hit a reasonable stiffness target. If a particular manufacturer's clamps aren't strong enough, you'd hear about it quickly, in here or elsewhere. In most cases, a broken set of clamps is the result of a major get-off, huge case, etc. This isn't necessarily true for bar mounts, though. More on that below.

Weight
Clamps should be as light as possible given that they're strong and stiff enough. Often times aftermarket clamps are about the same weigh as stock or heavier. If they're lighter, they typically give something up to get there, most notably stiffness.

Stiffness
For most people this is the least understood aspect in clamps by far. It's rare that riders, testers, the media, or anyone really truly understands it and it's clear from how they describe it (or typically don't adequately describe it). Most aftermarket companies will tell you they've "optimized stiffness" or have "optimal flex characteristics" or some other such nonsense. They never tell you what changed (more or less stiff? And in which conditions - torsion, bump, lateral, longitudinal? How is it optimal?).

The key to stiffness in clamp design is: maximizing vertical stiffness (bump) so the forks don't deflect and bind, maximizing torsional stiffness for steering precision and feel, and maintaining suitable flex longitudinally to help absorb bumps and vibrations. All these stiffness goals conflict with one another and are further compromised by compliance in the bar mounts as that has a major influence on feel as well. And it's important to note that stiffer clamps sometimes feels more plush to the rider as it allows the forks to work better than a flexy clamp that causes them to bind. Beyond that, you can't listen to someone who's tested clamps and noted on their stiffness without understanding the rest of their bike setup. Everything flexes - wheels, tires, forks, clamps, bars, chassis, axles, etc. If they've got some stiff A60 rims, a-kit forks, different tires, or anything else, it's all going to have an effect. If you want to understand the effects of clamp stiffness it really needs to be a back to back test on the same bike with a similar setup as yours.

Bar Mounts
Are the bar mounts the same as stock? Rubber mounted or solid? Some new "improved" design or same as stock? Do they fix a problem that the stock ones have; often twisting (most all rubber mounts) or bending (all current stock KTM/Husky mounts)? The key to a good bar mount design is having one that doesn't twist or bend from a minor crash, yet absorbs vibrations and bumps nicely. And it shouldn't weigh a ton! For example, the Xtrig mounts perform quite well, but they're nearly twice the weight of similar performing mounts.

Additional Features
Often times, aftermarket clamps are nothing more than machined copies of stock, with some very minor differences, and anodized to look nice. Pro Circuit is a great example of this. Nothing stands out about the design, they're on par with strength, stiffness, and weight of stock but with no extra features. But of course they have the cool factor because of the name... Lots of brands are similar to this, with only a few offering a unique design/advantage. Some are again similar to stock in design, but thinned up throughout so they're lighter. The downside of this is that they're flexy, which is rarely desirable.

Notable standouts with additional features are Xtrig (split fork tube clamp design, some offer adjustable offset, nice bar mounts, but otherwise very similar to stock and rather heavy), Neken (the air/spring bar mount versions - similar to stock otherwise and heavy due to the mounts), and Luxon (strong rubber mounted bar mounts with a topology optimized design, much different than stock - typically lighter stiffer and stronger than stock, but that's bike dependent).

Price
If you're looking for something that hits the mark on all the above points, it's not going to be cheap. Expect to pay on the order of $800 for a nice set of clamps with bar mounts. If you're just looking for anodized bling, you can probably find a set for something like $500 with bar mounts, or cheaper if they use the stock bar mounts. But why spend the money unless you can get some real performance benefit?

Obviously the Luxon clamps are the best available (we may be a bit biased though Laughing )! But really the best clamps are dependent on what bike you're putting them on, what features you're looking for, what trade-offs you're willing to make (stiffness, weight, bar mounts, etc.), and how much you can afford to spend. If you can provide more details I and/or other Vital members can point you in the right direction.


Edit: All that and I forgot to address the offset!

Offset can have a significant effect on handling. It's very bike dependent and these days the manufacturers have gotten it pretty close with their stock clamps. That said, it can still be an advantage to change it in some cases. Again, it's heavily rider, style of riding (moto, off-road, etc.), track condition, and bike dependent. Few people are going to buy multiple sets of clamps with different offsets and change them depending on what they're riding that day. Even the adjustable offset clamps like Xtrig are rarely touched once a rider finds the offset they like. As I said earlier, the manufacturers have done a pretty good job finding out what the right "happy medium" offset is for most people and most riding. You'll probably only want to change offset if you're doing something rather different from the norm.
Thanks for sharing all the great knowledge!

The bike is an '06 YZ250. It came with an '05 front end so I am building up a new(correct) front end. I have been shopping used OE triple clamps, mostly off old yz250fs that are being parted out, but I thought maybe I would go the aftermarket route instead of putting my money on fleebay. With aftermarket, I like that I don't have to press out the already beat up steering stem and swap it over to the 250f clamps.

Not sure if I want to go 22 offset or leave it 25. I love riding track, and a bike that corners, but I often find myself doing several desert trips throughout the year with my married friends on their ktm desert bikes.

Thanks again!
yz133rider
Posts
3863
Joined
8/1/2013
Location
Avondale, PA US
3/21/2019 3:53pm
Who makes a good set of triple clamps these days for a reasonable price? Other than changing offset are there any added benefits?
Luxon MX wrote:
What bike are they for? What would you like different from your stock clamps? There are a lot of Triple clamp options out there: Xtrig, Neken...
What bike are they for? What would you like different from your stock clamps?

There are a lot of Triple clamp options out there: Xtrig, Neken, Ride Engineering, DP Racing, Bud, Pro Circuit, Applied, BRP, Scar, Kite, probably some I'm forgetting, and of course Luxon. Some offer nothing more than bling (color anodized), others offer that plus various other features. Some main considerations in a clamp:

Strength
Really not an issue these days. A well designed set of clamps will be plenty strong assuming they've hit a reasonable stiffness target. If a particular manufacturer's clamps aren't strong enough, you'd hear about it quickly, in here or elsewhere. In most cases, a broken set of clamps is the result of a major get-off, huge case, etc. This isn't necessarily true for bar mounts, though. More on that below.

Weight
Clamps should be as light as possible given that they're strong and stiff enough. Often times aftermarket clamps are about the same weigh as stock or heavier. If they're lighter, they typically give something up to get there, most notably stiffness.

Stiffness
For most people this is the least understood aspect in clamps by far. It's rare that riders, testers, the media, or anyone really truly understands it and it's clear from how they describe it (or typically don't adequately describe it). Most aftermarket companies will tell you they've "optimized stiffness" or have "optimal flex characteristics" or some other such nonsense. They never tell you what changed (more or less stiff? And in which conditions - torsion, bump, lateral, longitudinal? How is it optimal?).

The key to stiffness in clamp design is: maximizing vertical stiffness (bump) so the forks don't deflect and bind, maximizing torsional stiffness for steering precision and feel, and maintaining suitable flex longitudinally to help absorb bumps and vibrations. All these stiffness goals conflict with one another and are further compromised by compliance in the bar mounts as that has a major influence on feel as well. And it's important to note that stiffer clamps sometimes feels more plush to the rider as it allows the forks to work better than a flexy clamp that causes them to bind. Beyond that, you can't listen to someone who's tested clamps and noted on their stiffness without understanding the rest of their bike setup. Everything flexes - wheels, tires, forks, clamps, bars, chassis, axles, etc. If they've got some stiff A60 rims, a-kit forks, different tires, or anything else, it's all going to have an effect. If you want to understand the effects of clamp stiffness it really needs to be a back to back test on the same bike with a similar setup as yours.

Bar Mounts
Are the bar mounts the same as stock? Rubber mounted or solid? Some new "improved" design or same as stock? Do they fix a problem that the stock ones have; often twisting (most all rubber mounts) or bending (all current stock KTM/Husky mounts)? The key to a good bar mount design is having one that doesn't twist or bend from a minor crash, yet absorbs vibrations and bumps nicely. And it shouldn't weigh a ton! For example, the Xtrig mounts perform quite well, but they're nearly twice the weight of similar performing mounts.

Additional Features
Often times, aftermarket clamps are nothing more than machined copies of stock, with some very minor differences, and anodized to look nice. Pro Circuit is a great example of this. Nothing stands out about the design, they're on par with strength, stiffness, and weight of stock but with no extra features. But of course they have the cool factor because of the name... Lots of brands are similar to this, with only a few offering a unique design/advantage. Some are again similar to stock in design, but thinned up throughout so they're lighter. The downside of this is that they're flexy, which is rarely desirable.

Notable standouts with additional features are Xtrig (split fork tube clamp design, some offer adjustable offset, nice bar mounts, but otherwise very similar to stock and rather heavy), Neken (the air/spring bar mount versions - similar to stock otherwise and heavy due to the mounts), and Luxon (strong rubber mounted bar mounts with a topology optimized design, much different than stock - typically lighter stiffer and stronger than stock, but that's bike dependent).

Price
If you're looking for something that hits the mark on all the above points, it's not going to be cheap. Expect to pay on the order of $800 for a nice set of clamps with bar mounts. If you're just looking for anodized bling, you can probably find a set for something like $500 with bar mounts, or cheaper if they use the stock bar mounts. But why spend the money unless you can get some real performance benefit?

Obviously the Luxon clamps are the best available (we may be a bit biased though Laughing )! But really the best clamps are dependent on what bike you're putting them on, what features you're looking for, what trade-offs you're willing to make (stiffness, weight, bar mounts, etc.), and how much you can afford to spend. If you can provide more details I and/or other Vital members can point you in the right direction.


Edit: All that and I forgot to address the offset!

Offset can have a significant effect on handling. It's very bike dependent and these days the manufacturers have gotten it pretty close with their stock clamps. That said, it can still be an advantage to change it in some cases. Again, it's heavily rider, style of riding (moto, off-road, etc.), track condition, and bike dependent. Few people are going to buy multiple sets of clamps with different offsets and change them depending on what they're riding that day. Even the adjustable offset clamps like Xtrig are rarely touched once a rider finds the offset they like. As I said earlier, the manufacturers have done a pretty good job finding out what the right "happy medium" offset is for most people and most riding. You'll probably only want to change offset if you're doing something rather different from the norm.
Thanks for sharing all the great knowledge! The bike is an '06 YZ250. It came with an '05 front end so I am building up a...
Thanks for sharing all the great knowledge!

The bike is an '06 YZ250. It came with an '05 front end so I am building up a new(correct) front end. I have been shopping used OE triple clamps, mostly off old yz250fs that are being parted out, but I thought maybe I would go the aftermarket route instead of putting my money on fleebay. With aftermarket, I like that I don't have to press out the already beat up steering stem and swap it over to the 250f clamps.

Not sure if I want to go 22 offset or leave it 25. I love riding track, and a bike that corners, but I often find myself doing several desert trips throughout the year with my married friends on their ktm desert bikes.

Thanks again!
Go with 22 or 22.5 handling is much improved.
3
Meister
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Canton, OH US
3/21/2019 4:22pm
Vital discount? Lol
loftyair
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riverside, CA US
3/21/2019 4:34pm
Just my opinion. I like the x-trig, with the rg3 bar mounts!
Looby321
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NY US
3/21/2019 5:27pm
I had Ride Engineering on my ‘04 Honda 250f back in 2006 and they honestly sucked. That was obviously awhile ago tho haha.
Luxon MX
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San Diego, CA US
3/21/2019 5:35pm
Thanks for sharing all the great knowledge! The bike is an '06 YZ250. It came with an '05 front end so I am building up a...
Thanks for sharing all the great knowledge!

The bike is an '06 YZ250. It came with an '05 front end so I am building up a new(correct) front end. I have been shopping used OE triple clamps, mostly off old yz250fs that are being parted out, but I thought maybe I would go the aftermarket route instead of putting my money on fleebay. With aftermarket, I like that I don't have to press out the already beat up steering stem and swap it over to the 250f clamps.

Not sure if I want to go 22 offset or leave it 25. I love riding track, and a bike that corners, but I often find myself doing several desert trips throughout the year with my married friends on their ktm desert bikes.

Thanks again!
Are you getting (or already have) the SSS forks or keeping the older forks? If you're going with SSS forks, are they from a two stroke or four stroke?

Yamaha is the most difficult from a comparability standpoint as the fork tube diameters are different and the stems are different depending on the year and model of the bike. The YZ250 uses the long stem, and it's the only one that has ever used the long stem. If you're getting clamps from a different model, you'll have to swap stems. Two strokes have a different fork tube clamp diameter up top than the four strokes do, so you'll have that to deal with too.

Regardless, I'd go to 22mm offset. The YZ250 was my personal bike for a few years and I've done back to back tests with 25 and 22mm offset. The 22mm is much better on the track and makes the bike corner easier. I mostly rode moto, but also rode a bit of desert with the 22mm clamps and didn't notice any real issues that would make me want to go back to 25mm.

We can set you up with clamps if you want to go that route, but if you're on a budget I'd stick to stock clamps. Depending on which forks you're running, you can find rubber mounted, 22mm offset, clamps from a 4 stroke that will either bolt right on or need a small bore change to the upper tubes. You'll need to swap stems, though. Blame Yamaha for all the confusion!
kunk
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North Richland Hills, TX US
3/21/2019 6:15pm
Meister wrote:
Vital discount? Lol
Luxon MX wrote:
VITAL-2019
How do you order the 22 mm offset? I don’t see an option for different offsets.

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Luxon MX
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3/21/2019 6:18pm
kunk wrote:
How do you order the 22 mm offset? I don’t see an option for different offsets.
The only offset we offer for Yamaha is 22mm at this time, so you're good to go if that's what you're after!
1
layenpipe25
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Simi Valley, CA US
3/25/2019 4:01pm
Thanks for sharing all the great knowledge! The bike is an '06 YZ250. It came with an '05 front end so I am building up a...
Thanks for sharing all the great knowledge!

The bike is an '06 YZ250. It came with an '05 front end so I am building up a new(correct) front end. I have been shopping used OE triple clamps, mostly off old yz250fs that are being parted out, but I thought maybe I would go the aftermarket route instead of putting my money on fleebay. With aftermarket, I like that I don't have to press out the already beat up steering stem and swap it over to the 250f clamps.

Not sure if I want to go 22 offset or leave it 25. I love riding track, and a bike that corners, but I often find myself doing several desert trips throughout the year with my married friends on their ktm desert bikes.

Thanks again!
Luxon MX wrote:
Are you getting (or already have) the SSS forks or keeping the older forks? If you're going with SSS forks, are they from a two stroke...
Are you getting (or already have) the SSS forks or keeping the older forks? If you're going with SSS forks, are they from a two stroke or four stroke?

Yamaha is the most difficult from a comparability standpoint as the fork tube diameters are different and the stems are different depending on the year and model of the bike. The YZ250 uses the long stem, and it's the only one that has ever used the long stem. If you're getting clamps from a different model, you'll have to swap stems. Two strokes have a different fork tube clamp diameter up top than the four strokes do, so you'll have that to deal with too.

Regardless, I'd go to 22mm offset. The YZ250 was my personal bike for a few years and I've done back to back tests with 25 and 22mm offset. The 22mm is much better on the track and makes the bike corner easier. I mostly rode moto, but also rode a bit of desert with the 22mm clamps and didn't notice any real issues that would make me want to go back to 25mm.

We can set you up with clamps if you want to go that route, but if you're on a budget I'd stick to stock clamps. Depending on which forks you're running, you can find rubber mounted, 22mm offset, clamps from a 4 stroke that will either bolt right on or need a small bore change to the upper tubes. You'll need to swap stems, though. Blame Yamaha for all the confusion!
I have a set of 08 YZ250f forks that I will be using.

My goal is to get a set of your clamps. You can tell that some real ingenuity went into the design. Awesome work! However, I want to make sure I like the 22mm offset before going all in. I found a used set of 22mm ride engineering clamps for cheap in my area that I want to buy and try. They came off a 2017 yz250. Although, I noticed RE's website shows their yz clamps fitting 05-19. I am worried they didn't account for the change in size on the upper fork that you mentioned. I believe in 2015, right? . I called them and they were unaware of any change in the forks. Is it too small of a change for it to be an issue with fitment?
1
Luxon MX
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San Diego, CA US
3/25/2019 4:20pm
I have a set of 08 YZ250f forks that I will be using. My goal is to get a set of your clamps. You can tell...
I have a set of 08 YZ250f forks that I will be using.

My goal is to get a set of your clamps. You can tell that some real ingenuity went into the design. Awesome work! However, I want to make sure I like the 22mm offset before going all in. I found a used set of 22mm ride engineering clamps for cheap in my area that I want to buy and try. They came off a 2017 yz250. Although, I noticed RE's website shows their yz clamps fitting 05-19. I am worried they didn't account for the change in size on the upper fork that you mentioned. I believe in 2015, right? . I called them and they were unaware of any change in the forks. Is it too small of a change for it to be an issue with fitment?
The 08 250F forks should bolt right up in the 2017 YZ250 clamps. The two strokes use the larger top clamp diameter (56mm) for all years. And back in 2008 the 250F was also the 56mm diameter. Yamaha went to 54mm upper diameter on the four strokes with the newer models (2010+ 450f, 2012+ 250f).
kijen
Posts
857
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10/1/2010
Location
Jacksonville, FL US
3/25/2019 5:10pm
If you are using 250f forks, i beleive they are 5mm shorter then the yz or 450 forks, thumpertalk g
Have a few threads that go over the differnce.
layenpipe25
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40
Joined
2/12/2019
Location
Simi Valley, CA US
3/29/2019 9:40am
The guy selling the ride engineering triple clamps, is also selling a performance lowering link for another $100. Is this something I should consider switching to 22mm offset?
Luxon MX
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829
Joined
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Location
San Diego, CA US
3/29/2019 1:35pm
The guy selling the ride engineering triple clamps, is also selling a performance lowering link for another $100. Is this something I should consider switching to...
The guy selling the ride engineering triple clamps, is also selling a performance lowering link for another $100. Is this something I should consider switching to 22mm offset?
I'd start with the clamps first, they'll make the most difference. Not sure how much longer the RE link is, but if it's only a mm or two, it won't be a big change. I was running the stock link geometry on my YZ250 with the 22mm offset clamps. Never tried a longer link.

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