Tubeless

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9/15/2019 7:42 AM

Who out there is running Nuetech TUbliss ? What has been your experience??
Thanks...-R

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9/15/2019 7:46 AM

I run it on my Enduro bike. Very happy with it. For MX I use tubes

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9/15/2019 9:02 AM

I have been using them for 3 years or so 90% MX.
I ride mostly sand tracks so love the lower psi I can run.
What I don't like is problems...sometimes hard to get a seal on new tire. If you get a random hole in tire..all easy to fix with a new tube in standard form but more difficult with tubeless.

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9/15/2019 9:40 AM

I’ve used it with good results but had a couple failures that turned me off. Great company and they always sent new replacements when they failed. I switched to their Nitromousse and won’t be going back to Tubliss. I also run a spare set of wheels with tubes for back ups or MX.

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9/15/2019 10:24 AM

seawitch wrote:

I have been using them for 3 years or so 90% MX.
I ride mostly sand tracks so love the lower psi I can run.
What I don't like is problems...sometimes hard to get a seal on new tire. If you get a random hole in tire..all easy to fix with a new tube in standard form but more difficult with tubeless.

I bought a set of Tubliss almost ten years ago but I never installed them after hearing about these problems.
One of them is still sitting up on the pallet racking in my shop someplace...

Looking at the surface finish inside a new tire I can see why they burp air, or fail to seal.
It's a neat idea in concept and the parts are decent quality.

It would be cool if tire companies got onboard and made their tires more compatible by smoothing that are of the inside where these need to seal. Just that 1/2" wide area inside the bead would do it.


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9/15/2019 7:22 PM

I’ve been running the same tubliss setup for almost 3 years now (250 hours spread over two different bikes). Never had a problem. I attribute some of this luck to using a good tire sealant as the install lube and as sealant in the tire. Super satisfying to throw on a new tire and watch the bead magically seat itself when you air up the inner chamber.

Even if my bike sits for two weeks straight, I only lose a couple psi in the tire. Seems as good as any tube I’ve ever used.

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9/16/2019 9:06 AM

I use it in my front tire for 100% mx. Everything works as advertised.

Install on the rim is simple. i had a little more fight from tire install than tire on standard tube. Not bad for someone who isn't mechanically inclined. Install alone should not scare you away.

I use tire slime for installation/sealant and i think that is the way to go.

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9/16/2019 8:38 PM

phatfi20 wrote:

I use it in my front tire for 100% mx. Everything works as advertised.

Install on the rim is simple. i had a little more fight from tire install than tire on standard tube. Not bad for someone who isn't mechanically inclined. Install alone should not scare you away.

I use tire slime for installation/sealant and i think that is the way to go.

So do you put the Tubliss on the rim before the tire? I've never installed one.

Typically, when I change a tire I puff a bunch of talc in the tire, then put the tube in the tire with just enough air to hold it's shape without wrinkling. Then, I install the tire/tube combo onto the wheel one bead at a time, but both from the brake rotor side (rear) and non-rotor side (front).

Other people who haven't figured it out try to put one bead on the wheel, then stuff the tube in and finally install the second bead... I did that as a kid, it's a pain in the ass and takes twice as long.

It seems like the tubliss insert would hog space in the bell of the rim making it tough to stretch the bead over the wheel, especially on a new tire.

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9/16/2019 8:53 PM

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9/16/2019 9:07 PM

I’ve used it for three years or so. Just like anything there’s a learning curve, mostly regarding the install. After several tire swaps it’s as easy as a tube for me now. I’ve never had an issue ‘burping’. I have picked up a couple flats trail riding as it’s super rocky where I ride. One of the best things about tubliss is the five minute trailside repair. Just carry a few tire plugs and a small bicycle pump. Also, you can run 0-10 psi too depending on how stiff your sidewall is, which really helps in technical terrain.

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9/17/2019 6:26 AM

phatfi20 wrote:

I use it in my front tire for 100% mx. Everything works as advertised.

Install on the rim is simple. i had a little more fight from tire install than tire on standard tube. Not bad for someone who isn't mechanically inclined. Install alone should not scare you away.

I use tire slime for installation/sealant and i think that is the way to go.

cwtoyota wrote:

So do you put the Tubliss on the rim before the tire? I've never installed one.

Typically, when I change a tire I puff a bunch of talc in the tire, then put the tube in the tire with just enough air to hold it's shape without wrinkling. Then, I install the tire/tube combo onto the wheel one bead at a time, but both from the brake rotor side (rear) and non-rotor side (front).

Other people who haven't figured it out try to put one bead on the wheel, then stuff the tube in and finally install the second bead... I did that as a kid, it's a pain in the ass and takes twice as long.

It seems like the tubliss insert would hog space in the bell of the rim making it tough to stretch the bead over the wheel, especially on a new tire.

It does exactly what you're saying. It makes it a "little" harder for tire to fall down into the rim, so the last "pry" can be a bit tight but I have them in front and rear and I love them. Its awesome being able to run 5psi in the rear. You notice a BIG gain in traction. It's also nice to be able to get a complete flat and still ride home at a good pace. That only happened once on my front but I was able to ride 9 miles home at about 90% normal pace. I put a couple pumps of Slime "tube sealant" in and have been riding it ever since.

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9/17/2019 11:25 AM

GuyWithABike wrote:

Great video, thanks for posting it. It seems that last little bite is a bit tougher (like Walleyeguy said above) but the rest doesn't look too bad.

Interesting that he installed the wheel into the tire between the beads first. it looks like the best method for that Tubliss system. That is the way I remove every single tire I work on, but installing them that way with a conventional tube doesn't work out at all.

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9/17/2019 11:55 AM

I've put hundreds and hundreds of hours on them over the years. Never had a single failure and I can run 8-10 psi which gives me more grip. I go to the line with them and honestly smile because I feel I have an advantage over everyone not running them.

I wouldn't run anything else. As has been mentioned...you need to install them correctly.

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9/17/2019 12:57 PM

I use it for my Enduro and cross country setups. I've never had a problem with mine and they've been on two different bikes with several sets of tires on both. I'm a huge fan.

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9/17/2019 6:31 PM

cwtoyota wrote:

Great video, thanks for posting it. It seems that last little bite is a bit tougher (like Walleyeguy said above) but the rest doesn't look too bad.

Interesting that he installed the wheel into the tire between the beads first. it looks like the best method for that Tubliss system. That is the way I remove every single tire I work on, but installing them that way with a conventional tube doesn't work out at all.

The "wheel into the tire between the beads first" method changed my life. So easy with Tubliss. Also, I cut the top 4" off a 5 gallon bucket and screwed it to the top of my work bench. Works amazing as a stand for changing tires.

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9/17/2019 6:36 PM

I have one in the rear of my CR250 it REALLY helps that 2 stroke get traction. Love it.

I ride 100% motocross, and I run 8 PSI. I don't know why ppl hate on them for moto... it's impossible to get a pinch flat with one, a no brainer for me. You can also use quick cheap plugs if you get a puncture.

I just bought a 450 and once I wear that tire out it's getting a Tubliss too, I hate the feel of 14PSI

Go slower than you think on the setup and you'll be fine.

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Life's a garden, dig it.

1996 CR250R
2016 YZ450F
2001 Suzuki Bandit 600

9/17/2019 9:49 PM

Tenacious P wrote:

I have one in the rear of my CR250 it REALLY helps that 2 stroke get traction. Love it.

I ride 100% motocross, and I run 8 PSI. I don't know why ppl hate on them for moto... it's impossible to get a pinch flat with one, a no brainer for me. You can also use quick cheap plugs if you get a puncture.

I just bought a 450 and once I wear that tire out it's getting a Tubliss too, I hate the feel of 14PSI

Go slower than you think on the setup and you'll be fine.

You should be able to run 13 psi on a rocky track and as low as 12 in the sand with a conventional standard duty tube with average tires. 14 is overkill for sure.

I run bridgestone X30 and X40 tires up here in the northwest and when I venture south and run 12.5 psi front and rear at just about every track.

Does the roll-under bother you at 8 psi? Seems like that would take some getting used to on hardpacked clay, especially off-camber stuff.

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9/19/2019 4:34 AM

Tenacious P wrote:

I have one in the rear of my CR250 it REALLY helps that 2 stroke get traction. Love it.

I ride 100% motocross, and I run 8 PSI. I don't know why ppl hate on them for moto... it's impossible to get a pinch flat with one, a no brainer for me. You can also use quick cheap plugs if you get a puncture.

I just bought a 450 and once I wear that tire out it's getting a Tubliss too, I hate the feel of 14PSI

Go slower than you think on the setup and you'll be fine.

cwtoyota wrote:

You should be able to run 13 psi on a rocky track and as low as 12 in the sand with a conventional standard duty tube with average tires. 14 is overkill for sure.

I run bridgestone X30 and X40 tires up here in the northwest and when I venture south and run 12.5 psi front and rear at just about every track.

Does the roll-under bother you at 8 psi? Seems like that would take some getting used to on hardpacked clay, especially off-camber stuff.

They don’t roll under at low psi like a tube does because the inner bladder holds the entire bead firmly against the rim. They obviously still can roll, but it has to be at a much lower pressure than with a tube setup. The construction of the tire also matters a lot. If the tire has a stiff sidewall it allows lower pressure without fear of it rolling.

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9/19/2019 6:30 AM

Any of you guys experience balance issues with Tubliss? Have heard this can be a big problem, especially for enduro/desert when speeds can be 45+ mph when riding faster sections or trail transitions.

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9/19/2019 6:53 AM

RACERX69 wrote:

Any of you guys experience balance issues with Tubliss? Have heard this can be a big problem, especially for enduro/desert when speeds can be 45+ mph when riding faster sections or trail transitions.

Yes. At 60 mph on pavement they are unbalanced big time. Some times when riding off road we end up on pavement linking up trails.

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