MX Lessons, are they worth it?

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5/17/2020 10:33 PM

So, after my first post of going for the first time on a MX track.
Yesterday i went to the track, it was a pretty good beginner track, but it didnt go really well, i felt really insecure, didn't feel like i had any control of my bike & most of the times i did alot of panic movement.
I kept doing what i thought i was doing right, but it didn't work out.
i had to quit riding after 2 full laps, because it felt really unsafe.

So here comes my question: is it worth taking a 1 on 1 lesson with a certified trainer?
The trainer is well known & also trained my younger brother in law & multiple other good riders.

I'm a bit in a brainstorm about it, because i don't wanna spend money for nothing, cause i don't know if i actually have the skillset to do MX, well i survived the 2 laps (fell once), but it was really really sketchy for me, maybe lessons will make me feel more comfortable?

P.S. i'm 23 years old

Your opinions about this are well appreciated.

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5/17/2020 11:10 PM

Depending on the price is where I’d go and how reputable the trainer is. It’s a good investment for sure. Ask people who he’s trained before how they liked the school and consider how you’d benefit from it. Everyone can learn from beginner to pro. Better money spent than some mods you don’t need. Good luck and enjoy!

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5/17/2020 11:27 PM

A trainer at the beginning is perfect! Learning stuff correctly from the start will keep bad habits away. Take some notes so that you always have these basics to fall back on. Knowing the correct body position alone can help you progress safely.

If the trainer is trusted with faster guys at the track he should be fine for a total beginner. Once you start improving from there and riding more, you’ll have a better idea of what you need to improve on and if different trainers are better for you.

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5/17/2020 11:34 PM

jmo443 wrote:

Depending on the price is where I’d go and how reputable the trainer is. It’s a good investment for sure. Ask people who he’s trained before how they liked the school and consider how you’d benefit from it. Everyone can learn from beginner to pro. Better money spent than some mods you don’t need. Good luck and enjoy!

His pricing is acceptable, he is trusted by alot of riders, including my younger brother in law.
He is very kind, patient & understandable. my biggest question is, if it could help for me.
Maybe i just don't have the skillset to do MX, but i really want to!

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5/17/2020 11:47 PM

Yes, it is very much worth it.
Almost every other sport participants get some type of formal training. but for some reason people tend to skip it in our sport.
It should give you some bike skills and confidence that you need.
Go for it, and let us know how you go.

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5/17/2020 11:50 PM

jmo443 wrote:

Depending on the price is where I’d go and how reputable the trainer is. It’s a good investment for sure. Ask people who he’s trained before how they liked the school and consider how you’d benefit from it. Everyone can learn from beginner to pro. Better money spent than some mods you don’t need. Good luck and enjoy!

FuseMX21 wrote:

His pricing is acceptable, he is trusted by alot of riders, including my younger brother in law.
He is very kind, patient & understandable. my biggest question is, if it could help for me.
Maybe i just don't have the skillset to do MX, but i really want to!

There is no magic skill set unless you want to make it right to the top, which it is too late anyway.
You obviously have the desire, and that is by far the most important part. use your head, and before you know it, you will be getting around the track fast enough and safe enough to have a great time.

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5/17/2020 11:53 PM

Yes, get help soon. Practice trail riding too, if possible. This is suppose to be fun and it sounds like your 2 laps were anything but. Find friends who you can ride with. Live, eat, and sleep motocross and don't push the learning curve too quickly, just get comfortable on the bike utilizing its basic functions safely and eventually, effectively.

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5/18/2020 12:14 AM

FuseMX21 wrote:

His pricing is acceptable, he is trusted by alot of riders, including my younger brother in law.
He is very kind, patient & understandable. my biggest question is, if it could help for me.
Maybe i just don't have the skillset to do MX, but i really want to!

If you find a good instructor, a few lessons will be a huge help.

What you get out of the lesson depends a great deal on how well you apply it.
Bring a notebook and write things down.
When you go to ride after the lesson, bring that notebook and review it before you hit the track. Try to actually apply each concept as you ride.

I think a lot of people go to course and learn one or two things, but don't really apply the majority of it because they don't continue to practice it. One day of instruction is enough information for several months of building good habits.

Here's a little pre-lesson you can learn a lot from, it's old, but it all still applies:

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5/18/2020 12:20 AM

wildbill wrote:

Yes, get help soon. Practice trail riding too, if possible. This is suppose to be fun and it sounds like your 2 laps were anything but. Find friends who you can ride with. Live, eat, and sleep motocross and don't push the learning curve too quickly, just get comfortable on the bike utilizing its basic functions safely and eventually, effectively.

Those 2 laps weren't fun at all indeed, i always go riding with my younger brother in law, sadly there are no trails available where i live, only tracks & most of those tracks are really "fast".
The one i went to this weekend was the 2nd slowest, theres still 1 better for beginners & thats where the guy teaches.
So i will always have to go on a track with several people, but that doesnt scare me, the thing that scares me the most is the uncontrollable bike & the high jumps (even though these we'rent even that high).

I also need to set the bike more to my personal prefference, the shifter pedal is way to low, i got big feet (size 12).
i'm 6'3, so the bike isn't really made for me lmao.

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5/18/2020 1:18 AM

Learn technique and speed comes with time. If the trainer is a former Pro or close to it with knowledge, yes it could be worth it. Seems like you are Dutch as well, you need some technique to attack these sand trackssmile

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5/18/2020 1:32 AM

In my experience yes, but only if you do it private or with a small group of 3-4 riders (5 is the absolute maximum amount). 10+ groups are almost a waste of time. Yes, you'll get a good day of riding but the odds are that the guy teaching wont be able to help you enough with that large of a group.

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5/18/2020 1:42 AM

YES

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5/18/2020 1:45 AM

If you learn the basics it's a huge step in the right direction. The longer you are doing it wrong the longer it takes to get rid of a bad technique. You are from NL? In the north I can highly recommend Marco Super or Erik van Klinken.

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5/18/2020 1:56 AM

Cortami79 wrote:

Learn technique and speed comes with time. If the trainer is a former Pro or close to it with knowledge, yes it could be worth it. Seems like you are Dutch as well, you need some technique to attack these sand trackssmile

Yep dutch, went to vlissingen this weekend, didn't turn out great..

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5/18/2020 1:57 AM

headlightracer wrote:

If you learn the basics it's a huge step in the right direction. The longer you are doing it wrong the longer it takes to get rid of a bad technique. You are from NL? In the north I can highly recommend Marco Super or Erik van Klinken.

i'm from zeeland, not really close :p

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5/18/2020 2:07 AM

If you don’t do classes, google it and video tape yourself riding!

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5/18/2020 2:31 AM

Hit Ryno up, he’s not up to much and I imagine it’d take your riding to a whole new psychedelic level.

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5/18/2020 2:49 AM

tobz wrote:

Hit Ryno up, he’s not up to much and I imagine it’d take your riding to a whole new psychedelic level.

i'm not sure what you mean with this?
Ryno?

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5/18/2020 3:48 AM

Havent paid for one myself, but ive heard countless people in person and on here that the best thing to spend money on is a lesson.

Imagine trying to learn to drive a car without any instruction by either your parents or a driving school. Its the same concept.

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5/18/2020 3:57 AM

I’ve done 2 “schools” and I’ve definitely learned from both. If at all possible try and fine someone who will do lessons 1 on 1. Imo you would learn more from 30 minutes of 1 on 1 training than 2 hours with a group.

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5/18/2020 4:04 AM

Very, very helpful, especially if you're a beginner.
Avoids getting bad habits and wrong techniques right from the start, makes you safer, teaches you all the mandatory basics...
Definitely puts you on the right track!

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5/18/2020 4:10 AM

FuseMX21 wrote:

His pricing is acceptable, he is trusted by alot of riders, including my younger brother in law.
He is very kind, patient & understandable. my biggest question is, if it could help for me.
Maybe i just don't have the skillset to do MX, but i really want to!

Working the right way, and working and working again will get you there.
I absolutely wanted to learn snowboard...
Man, my first days were absolutely miserable, even by beginners standards...
Though I'll never get to the Olympics, lol, a few weeks of intense sweating got me to a pretty decent level, without the slightest bit of natural talent, lol...

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5/18/2020 4:44 AM

Of course lessons are worth it and will help lay a solid foundation for you. But most importantly you just need to spend time on the bike and in a low pressure setting. Find a field and set up a turn track and ride it until your tank is dry. Reverse it and do it again. Sleep on it and repeat. Eventually you’ll have enough confidence to be able to ride around any track. Airing out the jumps is another matter and that will come later.

Side note: how many new riders never give moto a try because the tracks are too intimidating for them these days?

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5/18/2020 4:50 AM

Give it time and you will be fine. The guys that make it look easy have thousands of hours of seat time.

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5/18/2020 5:09 AM

Doing eights around two tires is the best beginners exercise in the world...
Accelerate, upshift, downshift and brake, turn to the right, accelerate, upshift, downshift and brake, turn to the left...
wink

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5/18/2020 5:15 AM

If your brother in law can ride then why can't he work with you to set some basics before eating money on lessons?

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5/18/2020 5:29 AM

crusher773 wrote:

If your brother in law can ride then why can't he work with you to set some basics before eating money on lessons?

Because he rides since his 6 years old & most of the time drove a 125cc 2 stroke, he isnt really a teaching type of person & can't really explain things very well, everything is natural for him. Main reason is that he is not the teaching type of person.

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5/18/2020 5:30 AM

GODZILLA wrote:

Doing eights around two tires is the best beginners exercise in the world...
Accelerate, upshift, downshift and brake, turn to the right, accelerate, upshift, downshift and brake, turn to the left...
wink

i have been doing this for several hours, this went really well & i felt comfortable then, but on track... very different.

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5/18/2020 5:31 AM

jmo443 wrote:

Depending on the price is where I’d go and how reputable the trainer is. It’s a good investment for sure. Ask people who he’s trained before how they liked the school and consider how you’d benefit from it. Everyone can learn from beginner to pro. Better money spent than some mods you don’t need. Good luck and enjoy!

FuseMX21 wrote:

His pricing is acceptable, he is trusted by alot of riders, including my younger brother in law.
He is very kind, patient & understandable. my biggest question is, if it could help for me.
Maybe i just don't have the skillset to do MX, but i really want to!

You can't decide if you have the skillsets for MX after only doing 2 laps. It is a constant learning process, at your level and even the highest level.
You say you're 23; I started at 22/23 and was absolutely terrible, now 4 years later its starting to come together for me. So don't let age be a factor as you're still young.

As for coaching, it will be 100% worth it.

Lastly, don't worry about trying to hit jumps if youre not ready, it's ok to roll jumps and go around corners as slow as you feel you need to, faster riders can see you and make their way around you. Stick at it!

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5/18/2020 5:54 AM

jmo443 wrote:

Depending on the price is where I’d go and how reputable the trainer is. It’s a good investment for sure. Ask people who he’s trained before how they liked the school and consider how you’d benefit from it. Everyone can learn from beginner to pro. Better money spent than some mods you don’t need. Good luck and enjoy!

FuseMX21 wrote:

His pricing is acceptable, he is trusted by alot of riders, including my younger brother in law.
He is very kind, patient & understandable. my biggest question is, if it could help for me.
Maybe i just don't have the skillset to do MX, but i really want to!

kieran_macca wrote:

You can't decide if you have the skillsets for MX after only doing 2 laps. It is a constant learning process, at your level and even the highest level.
You say you're 23; I started at 22/23 and was absolutely terrible, now 4 years later its starting to come together for me. So don't let age be a factor as you're still young.

As for coaching, it will be 100% worth it.

Lastly, don't worry about trying to hit jumps if youre not ready, it's ok to roll jumps and go around corners as slow as you feel you need to, faster riders can see you and make their way around you. Stick at it!

What you say is very true about the only 2 laps deciding part.
I did roll over jumps, i did take my corners slow, but i feel like i cramp up alot & that makes it feel very dangerous, even at low speed.

But i decided i'm going to give a 1on1 lesson a try. lets see what it gives!

i'm also very tall, 6'3. so i'm not sure if the bike is really set up comfortable for me.

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