Looking for a new career.

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2/5/2018 11:11 AM

I’m 27, my wife is the breadwinner right now, bringing home 40k a year while going to school full time and raising our 2 year old.

I feel I have worked myself into the ground from the age of 18. I don’t want to end up like my father and step father (one disabled now due to work injuries, and the other with rapidly declining health due to 45 years of intense manual labor).

I have “job hopped” my whole life, always struggling to make ends meet on a shoe string budget. One construction/labor job to another.... living paycheck to paycheck. Parents have no retirement, and my dad lives below poverty level. I tried to pay for college while working to cover my living expenses, and couldn’t make ends meet so had to forfeit and go back to full time work.

I currently work in an electrical supply chain warehouse. Stupid work. Everyone here is nice, but mindless work picking orders and packing boxes for 9 hours. Benefits are second to none, and company has an ESOP. After 7 years you are “fully vested” and can continue to build your stock from there. It’s obviosuly a wise choice for anyone looking to retire with a good chunk of change, but I am extremely depressed and unmovitved.

I came in with a full head of steam, but after a little over 1 year now, I feel burnt out and don’t see myself excelling to anything within the company that would satisfy me. As mentioned before, the thought of retirement money and benefits are the ONLY things forcing me to drive the 45 minute commute here every day.

I lack a large network, haven’t been on social media in years, and have one good friend so asking around for work is pretty much a non-option.

If any of you vitards know of anyone looking for a good hand, I have a resume on hand. Current annual salary is 32k, before taxes.

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2/5/2018 11:14 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/5/2018 11:14 AM

The biggest question that needs to be answered is – what do you want to do?

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2/5/2018 11:23 AM

akillerwombat wrote:

The biggest question that needs to be answered is – what do you want to do?

Well, like many on this forum, I would love have a job in the Moto industry. I just don’t know if I could handle being away from my family a majority of the year. If the pay is there, I could make it work.

So really, what I WANT to do right now, and what I HAVE to do to keep my family fed are two separate things. I don’t mind, but I am looking for a higher salary. I’m tired of living by the thread of my pants and would enjoy being able to send my kid to college when he’s of age.

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2/5/2018 11:25 AM

akillerwombat wrote:

The biggest question that needs to be answered is – what do you want to do?

JayBraap19 wrote:

Well, like many on this forum, I would love have a job in the Moto industry. I just don’t know if I could handle being away from my family a majority of the year. If the pay is there, I could make it work.

So really, what I WANT to do right now, and what I HAVE to do to keep my family fed are two separate things. I don’t mind, but I am looking for a higher salary. I’m tired of living by the thread of my pants and would enjoy being able to send my kid to college when he’s of age.

What type of job in the moto industry?

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2/5/2018 11:35 AM

Just a suggestion but see if you can learn a trade, plumbing, electrical, etc. These jobs are a little less hard on your body than framing or roofing, plus there are many repairs associated with them not just new construction. Sounds like you want to get away from the robotics of your current job. No way i would think about putting in 20-30 years at a job that bores me to death just to bank on the retirement plan.

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2/5/2018 12:06 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/5/2018 12:20 PM

This may seem like a silly question, but I am not that knowledgeable on company organised retirement funds.

Is the value of the retirement based on the stock value of your employer?

If the company goes bankrupt or is bought out do you get screwed?

Seems like 27 is a little young to make a retirement plan your main priority in job decisions.

Do you dream of someday owning a business?

Have you checked to see if a local community college offers testing as to preferred careers?

What do you enjoy besides moto (because let's face it, most moto jobs other than sales either require travel or pay nothing)?

Where do you live and are you and your family willing to relocate?

Just a few questions that pop into my mind.

And I am a 54 year old that has less than $3k in an Ira and real estate I hope I can get my money out of 10 years from now.

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2/5/2018 12:15 PM

JustMX wrote:

This may seem like a silly question, but I am not that knowledgeable on company organised retirement funds.

Is the value of the retirement based on the stock value of your employer?

If the company goes bankrupt or is bought out do you get screwed?

Seems like 27 is a little young to make a retirement plan your main priority in job decisions.

Do you dream of someday owning a business?

Have you checked to see if a local community college offers testing as to preferred careers?

What do you enjoy besides moto (because let's face it, most moto jobs other than sales either require travel or pay nothing)?

Where do you live and are you and your family willing to relocate?

Just a few questions that pop into my mind.

And I am a 54 year old that has less than $3k in an Ira and real estate I hope I can get my money out of 10 years from now.

Yes, that is correct

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2/5/2018 12:16 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/5/2018 12:17 PM

Outside of moto, what other interests do you have that could possibly bring in some income? IT related interests, trades, subjects from when you were in school? Do you ever look at which fields are currently in high demand and see if there is something that you could see yourself working in?



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2/5/2018 12:19 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/5/2018 12:21 PM

I second the suggestion about learning a trade. The one I recommend most to young guys is HVAC Technician. Where I am, I believe it's a 6-month program to get an HVAC Tech certificate from the community college. The company that does all my HVAC work starts their techs at $30/hr or so. They just can't find anyone clean cut, legal, reliable, and that wants to work. I heard an ad on the radio the other day for an HVAC company looking for techs starting at $75k a year with benefits.
The added bonus is, all the equipment made nowadays is mostly junk, so that's like job security. My guess is within 10-15 years, maybe sooner, good tradesmen will be able to demand high pay.
I don't know what the licensing requirements are by you, but after a few years of working for someone else you may be able to get one and start your own business. Self-employment is a great way to go. Good luck to you in whatever you decide to pursue!!

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2/5/2018 12:19 PM

early wrote:

Just a suggestion but see if you can learn a trade, plumbing, electrical, etc. These jobs are a little less hard on your body than framing or roofing, plus there are many repairs associated with them not just new construction. Sounds like you want to get away from the robotics of your current job. No way i would think about putting in 20-30 years at a job that bores me to death just to bank on the retirement plan.

I have explored those options. I have dabbled in carpentry, finish carpentry, plumbing, welding (SMAW, MIG), pipe fitting, equipment operator, and started learning about electrical work here. I have no qualms with any of the trades, but I’ve found more often than not, a good salary is almost always backed my extremely long hours (aka lots of OT).

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2/5/2018 12:29 PM

woodsrider427 wrote:

I second the suggestion about learning a trade. The one I recommend most to young guys is HVAC Technician. Where I am, I believe it's a 6-month program to get an HVAC Tech certificate from the community college. The company that does all my HVAC work starts their techs at $30/hr or so. They just can't find anyone clean cut, legal, reliable, and that wants to work. I heard an ad on the radio the other day for an HVAC company looking for techs starting at $75k a year with benefits.
The added bonus is, all the equipment made nowadays is mostly junk, so that's like job security. My guess is within 10-15 years, maybe sooner, good tradesmen will be able to demand high pay.
I don't know what the licensing requirements are by you, but after a few years of working for someone else you may be able to get one and start your own business. Self-employment is a great way to go. Good luck to you in whatever you decide to pursue!!

I second this if interested in a trade. Outside of me, pretty much everyone on my my fathers side of the family own t businesses working in HVAC/appliance repair. They all appear to make really good money. The only uncle I have who doesn't work in HVAC owns his business installing cell towers. Life appears reeeeal good for him

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2/5/2018 12:34 PM

What about Police, Firemen, or EMT?

10 year veteran officer in some of the Dallas suburbs are making 75k a year. And you have options for overtime and private security income on the side as well.

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2/5/2018 12:36 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/5/2018 12:38 PM

Have you looked into the military? Ive been in for 16 years now (6 active, 10 reserve) and it was the best decision I ever made. Didn't have the money or desire to go to college but wanted to learn a trade. Good benefits and they now have a 401k type of pension. If you did 4 years you would walk away with good technical skills and a 401k. Edit: you can also transfer your GI Bill to your children.

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2/5/2018 12:57 PM

Metro here in Vegas is always hiring. I went the C/O route. Pay is good, guaranteed pension, work 12 hour shifts, 3 on 3 off 4 on 4 off is how the schedule goes. If you have any other questions about it pm me.

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2020 KTM 350 SXF

2/5/2018 2:33 PM

HVAC seems like a no-brainer in Phoenix, dude. Especially the AC part! laughing

If you want to get into the motorcycle industry, your best bet is to start at a dealership. Ride Now has their headquarters in Chandler, so you are pretty close... that's a pretty corporate way to go and it would help you have some experience so you can apply at an OEM or aftermarket manufacturer later.

If I had to give you what I think might be the best advice, however, it is this: Go to a trade school and get certified in something IT-related. There will always be computer needs now, in the same way that there will always be HVAC needs. Every single company out there has at least one computer, and 99.9% of them need at least one person to manage a network for them.

As for me, I wish I had gone into a better-paying profession so I could actually afford to enjoy motorcycles. Think about that.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

2/5/2018 3:05 PM

MM52913 wrote:

Have you looked into the military? Ive been in for 16 years now (6 active, 10 reserve) and it was the best decision I ever made. Didn't have the money or desire to go to college but wanted to learn a trade. Good benefits and they now have a 401k type of pension. If you did 4 years you would walk away with good technical skills and a 401k. Edit: you can also transfer your GI Bill to your children.

I agree with this, my daughter did it and it worked out well for her

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If you like uncle tony's meatballs, you'll love his sausage

Now that's Italian

2/5/2018 4:09 PM

Take it from an old (compared to you) man. Try to find something you like to do.
I’m a licensed electrician but have always worked for large corporations in production/facilities/engineering departments. But I dread going in everyday. I’m burnt out and it seems so uninspiring and boring after all these years. This wasn’t my dream, but my experience just led me here. I make a good living, can afford nice bikes, but something is lacking and I haven’t been able to put my finger on it.
If I were your age I would consider-
Railroad - excellent benefits and retirement.
Firefighter or police - Not the same thing every day and great retirement.
Sales- by the time you’re my age you could be making great money. I had a traveling job once upon a time and met a guy in a hotel bar who sold mercury outboard engines to marinas and boat dealers. The guys work attire was khaki shorts and sperrys. I envied him.
I think male humans are happier doing something with a sense of adventure and excitement. At least I think that’s what I’ve been craving.

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2/5/2018 4:45 PM

I would recommend a machinist or tool and die except it's the first and easiest trade that can be outsourced . It's great to be able to make anything you can think of ,especially for your bikes. The pay usually doesn't start off to high though either which is why nobody is getting in to the trade anymore. Once you get the hang of it though ,you can make really good money.

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2/5/2018 4:49 PM

Trades my friend. If you can get into one of the trades you're set. Good money, benefits and hours. You won't be what I'd consider rich but you'll make enough money to have a nice life and retire without worry.

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2/5/2018 5:02 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/5/2018 5:02 PM

Take what you are naturally good at or what type of qualities tend to be your strong suit. Examine what fields are in demand/pay well. Find something where those intersect.


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2/5/2018 5:42 PM

Falcon wrote:

HVAC seems like a no-brainer in Phoenix, dude. Especially the AC part! laughing

If you want to get into the motorcycle industry, your best bet is to start at a dealership. Ride Now has their headquarters in Chandler, so you are pretty close... that's a pretty corporate way to go and it would help you have some experience so you can apply at an OEM or aftermarket manufacturer later.

If I had to give you what I think might be the best advice, however, it is this: Go to a trade school and get certified in something IT-related. There will always be computer needs now, in the same way that there will always be HVAC needs. Every single company out there has at least one computer, and 99.9% of them need at least one person to manage a network for them.

As for me, I wish I had gone into a better-paying profession so I could actually afford to enjoy motorcycles. Think about that.

Funny, I actually worked for the large RideNow Powersports in chandler for 7 months. Horrible experience. The GM of that facility is the Vice Presidents son, and everyone below him is his “tight” group of friends. The sales managers cared about nothing other than sales quotas, and “upping” customers. Pretty much fired people for not being obnoxious, pushy salesmen.

Besides that, you don’t make any money in a facility that large. Too many salesmen, not enough paying customers.

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2/5/2018 5:43 PM

Lots of great ideas in here. I really appreciate everyone’s help and responses!

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2/5/2018 7:29 PM

Another vote for learning a trade. Once you are skilled/licensed in an in-demand field, you have rock solid job security and control your own destiny, so to speak. Might not make as much salary as Joe Company Man working middle management for Acme Enterprises or whatever, but you'll be able to pick up and move wherever and still find decent paying work.

Aside from hvac, electrical, carpentry, etc., consider medical specialties if you have the interest. A lot of the programs can be done in about two years. Great pay, great benefits, recession proof...and usually a 3 or 4 day work week. Some things to consider: Respiratory therapy, Nuclear medicine, Radiology technician, Nursing, Surgical tech, etc. Etc.

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2/5/2018 7:40 PM

Same feelings with my current job. I find it so daunting to decide on a field or career when it’s so hard to tell if I’ll actually enjoy it or be happy with it. Also trying to find something that pays good enough but gives time to do things I want to do is hard. So good luck.

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2/5/2018 7:46 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/5/2018 7:55 PM

Trades are hurting for driven individuals. Pick a trade!

Military is awesome man. Take the asvab. If you don’t know what you want to do. The military will find you a job and will make you great at it. And pay you well.

Active duty base salary and your housing allowance will crush 32k a year. It is with risks of course. Maybe inquire about the us army mos:12R (twelve Romeo) interior electrician.....do 3-6 years and you’ll have real world experience to apply to a civilian job. 12 Romeo isn’t your only option....there are many. Atleast take the ASVAB to see what jobs you qualify for.

Everyone in the military isn’t given a swift kick in the ass, a rifle and a screaming superior sayin “go fight.”


Those that appear to be well off to you haven’t got there because it was easy. They got there working a lot of overtime, and sacrificing a lot. I don’t really know what the answer to life is, but the more you make the more you’ll spend. It’s a battle for sure. Get set in your career now and keep retirement on the horizon....you’ll figure it out.


A young healthy man wants to be rich.
An old rich man wants to be healthy. Enjoy your family, create a good work/life balance....and just try hard.

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GP740
Since 1987

2/5/2018 10:02 PM

I second HVAC, specifically the commercial side. I did the college thing and got a job for one of my professors who started his own company. Loved the work, but no benefits and the pay wasn't great at 40k a year. My dad got me a job at Trane and I've gotten up to 75k in 3.5 years. I don't work much overtime, but it's there if you want it. If you're mechanically inclined, or good with computers, there are jobs everywhere. Good techs are making $100,000+ a year.

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2/5/2018 11:19 PM

I 2nd learning a trade, every building in existence has plumbing and electrical. Ever think about doing pool service ? Once they dig that hole they're pretty much stuck with it. There's good money doing repairs and the service is steady money. I can't say I know anyone who became a poolman on purpose, it just sort of happens.... laughing You have to be motivated and willing to learn how to do repairs to make decent money. But it's still better than busting yer ass for a pat on the back from some dickwad boss. The more effort you put in, the more $ you get out. Which isn't always the case working for a company. J/K it sucks. Stay in school lol

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2/6/2018 2:05 AM

Trade school. Become a pipefitter, electrician, millwright.... welder.... etc. Huge demand for trades in this country.

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2/6/2018 5:28 AM

GeorgiePorgie wrote:

Trades are hurting for driven individuals. Pick a trade!

Military is awesome man. Take the asvab. If you don’t know what you want to do. The military will find you a job and will make you great at it. And pay you well.

Active duty base salary and your housing allowance will crush 32k a year. It is with risks of course. Maybe inquire about the us army mos:12R (twelve Romeo) interior electrician.....do 3-6 years and you’ll have real world experience to apply to a civilian job. 12 Romeo isn’t your only option....there are many. Atleast take the ASVAB to see what jobs you qualify for.

Everyone in the military isn’t given a swift kick in the ass, a rifle and a screaming superior sayin “go fight.”


Those that appear to be well off to you haven’t got there because it was easy. They got there working a lot of overtime, and sacrificing a lot. I don’t really know what the answer to life is, but the more you make the more you’ll spend. It’s a battle for sure. Get set in your career now and keep retirement on the horizon....you’ll figure it out.


A young healthy man wants to be rich.
An old rich man wants to be healthy. Enjoy your family, create a good work/life balance....and just try hard.

A young healthy man wants to be rich.
An old rich man wants to be healthy. Enjoy your family, create a good work/life balance....and just try hard.


Probably the best advice I've read on this whole site.

I worked as a telephone lineman for years before I finally got enough sense to leave. Pay was great (up to 80 hrs a week) but I was never home, and when I was, I was mad or stressed out from the work day. I found a needle in a haystack desk job for about the same pay, 9-5, no overtime or weekends and haven't looked back since.

For me, it was less about the job itself, and more about what the job allowed me to do outside of work.
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"A motorcycle is a bicycle with a pandemonium attachment and is designed for the especial use of mechanical geniuses, daredevils, and lunatics"  George Fitch, 1916

2/6/2018 6:25 AM

GeorgiePorgie wrote:

Trades are hurting for driven individuals. Pick a trade!

Military is awesome man. Take the asvab. If you don’t know what you want to do. The military will find you a job and will make you great at it. And pay you well.

Active duty base salary and your housing allowance will crush 32k a year. It is with risks of course. Maybe inquire about the us army mos:12R (twelve Romeo) interior electrician.....do 3-6 years and you’ll have real world experience to apply to a civilian job. 12 Romeo isn’t your only option....there are many. Atleast take the ASVAB to see what jobs you qualify for.

Everyone in the military isn’t given a swift kick in the ass, a rifle and a screaming superior sayin “go fight.”


Those that appear to be well off to you haven’t got there because it was easy. They got there working a lot of overtime, and sacrificing a lot. I don’t really know what the answer to life is, but the more you make the more you’ll spend. It’s a battle for sure. Get set in your career now and keep retirement on the horizon....you’ll figure it out.


A young healthy man wants to be rich.
An old rich man wants to be healthy. Enjoy your family, create a good work/life balance....and just try hard.

No offense to anyone who has suggested the military, but i have given it thought over the years and have spoke with many acquaintances who are enlisted, and I just don’t have any interest. I respect those who do choose to serve our country, but after a family friend was deployed to Iraq multiple times, seeing what he went through and some of the EXTREMELY graphic images, my mind was made up. Obviously deployment isn’t something everyone has to face, but that doesn’t change the fact that it is a possibility.

That quote pretty much sums up my dilemma from the last two years. I worked in the welding/pipe fitting trade in the North Dakota oil fields for two years, and I put in more hours in those two years than most employed Americans put in over a 4 year time span. After I realized Uncle Sam was taxing my paycheck almost .70 cents on the dollar after breaking 70 hours in the work week, as well as the extremely unhealthy diet I was living off of, I knew it wasn’t a sustainable lifestyle.

I have no issues working hard or putting in some long days, but I’m just tired of doing it against my will. I am grateful for what I have, but am never complacent. I am an extremely passionate and competitive person. Ever since I stopped racing, I have had a deep burning feeling inside my gut that nothing has been able to satisfy.

I learned the basics of copywriting and did some freelance work online last year, and that wasn’t too horrible. I spoke with Kris Keefer a few months back and offered my services if he ever needed someone to write some content for his website, which I would love to do, but I wouldnt expect much in terms of monetary gains (more so just for the love of the sport).

I have also considered trying to squeeze into the industry as a personal trainer. I have always enjoyed “training” and going to the gym, and attempted to go to college for kinesiology. After my short run at a college degree, I started to study to get certified through ACE and NASM. I never took the final exams due to..... you guessed it, lack of money.

Are there any members here that are in either of the two previously mentioned fields of work?

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