Core Strengthening With bad back

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8/3/2017 8:33 AM

Guy's:

I need some special Core Strengthening Tips!

Due to a broken back & a hernia that runs from my Zyphiod (SP) process to almost my belly button, I can't do even one sit up's !

Any Idea's ?

I've been riding my MTB & lost 35 pounds!

BTW: any want a set of inversion boots? FREE you just pay the shipping! I now have a inversion table.

First come first serve!

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00' BMW K1200 RS
83' Maico 490 ( The Project bike)
81' Maico 490- FOR SALE
03' KTM 525 SX (In ICU)
14.5 KTM 450 Fe- FOR SALE

8/3/2017 8:40 AM

Based on your broken back, and hernia, I'm not sure if these staple moves will work. Here goes. Hang from the pull-up bar, and do straight leg-leg lifts for the abdominals, followed up with a superset of standing toe touches for 12 reps. Really hits that lower back, and hamstrings. Keep the back straight on both movements. Again, I'm not sure if your injuries will allow for it.

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United States of America

8/3/2017 8:42 AM

Aren't you in physical therapy?

Earlier this year my insurance quit paying for physical therapy, so I've been seeing a personal trainer at the college who happens to be in school for physical therapy. She's really helped me out alot. Good *cheap option if your insurance won't pay for more.

Imo, don't take work out advice from the Internet to deal with a broken back.

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8/3/2017 8:48 AM

Get a script from your Dr. and see a Physical Therapist. Because of different reasons I've seen probably six different therapist over the years for my lower back. Some are better than others, some are even idiots. However, a good PT will have a good base program for you. I can think of over 100 exercises right now do you can do. Start out easy and simple.

Google core strengthening. Again, start out easy and simple and build up.

I bought a top line "teeter" inverter two years ago. Man, it is slick. It works great and very comfortable. However it does not help my back. Too bad.

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8/3/2017 8:52 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/3/2017 12:39 PM

colintrax wrote:

Aren't you in physical therapy?

Earlier this year my insurance quit paying for physical therapy, so I've been seeing a personal trainer at the college who happens to be in school for physical therapy. She's really helped me out alot. Good *cheap option if your insurance won't pay for more.

Imo, don't take work out advice from the Internet to deal with a broken back.

Broke my back almost 2.5 years ago, Therapy only lasted 2 months & then I was back at work.

Insurance at the time wasn't very good.

Once I could walk & sit without pain, I was done!

Got laid off in Feb & got lazy,I did it to myself not realizing that I had the hernia until I got a new insurance & doctor!

I tried a few time to do a sit up, but it's no go at this point.

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00' BMW K1200 RS
83' Maico 490 ( The Project bike)
81' Maico 490- FOR SALE
03' KTM 525 SX (In ICU)
14.5 KTM 450 Fe- FOR SALE

8/3/2017 9:03 AM

I just googled core strengthening exercises beginner, intermediate, advanced. You should find what you need.

Good luck. It's good you're doing this

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8/3/2017 9:07 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/3/2017 10:53 AM

Larry, get my email from Newmann and I will share my routine. Glad you are getting back at it!

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8/3/2017 9:54 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/3/2017 9:56 AM

You need to see a pro. There is a fairly new medical specialty out there called physical medicine. It will be a doc, maybe an orthopedist running it and PT, pain management doctor, a neurosurgeon and sometimes a nutrionist/dietician and even a mental health specialist. They are all under one roof and the lead doc coordinates your care.It is a whole health approach. My wife saw one for her messed up back. She saw a pain management doctor first and the the ortho doc together with the PM doc. The 3 of them discussed her pain and made a consensual change. It was refreshing to actually be an active part of her treatment. When was the last time you saw 2 docs at the same time when they weren't going to cut on you?

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The older I get, the faster I was.

8/3/2017 10:05 AM

Sit-up! Yikes.

Find a Rehab/Chiro guy that has expertise in Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS) for rehabilitation, functional training, and corrective exercise and you will succeed.

That's what worked from me after spending thousands, surgery, 5 ortho's, etc.

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8/3/2017 11:38 AM

Important to strengthen lower abdominals to combat pelvic tilt. Glutes are good for back too.

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8/3/2017 11:54 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/3/2017 11:54 AM

Ab wheel..... if your back can handle it. They cost like 10$.

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8/3/2017 12:02 PM

JB 19 wrote:

Ab wheel..... if your back can handle it. They cost like 10$.

Those things are hard on the back. Great if the person has a strong core.

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United States of America

8/3/2017 12:38 PM

JB 19 wrote:

Ab wheel..... if your back can handle it. They cost like 10$.

Camp332 wrote:

Those things are hard on the back. Great if the person has a strong core.

Yeah, they're gnarly if you're starting from scratch. That one exercise can single handedly keep my back pain away.....but be careful if your back and core are weak. The thing is no joke.

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8/3/2017 2:47 PM

JB 19 wrote:

Ab wheel..... if your back can handle it. They cost like 10$.

Camp332 wrote:

Those things are hard on the back. Great if the person has a strong core.

JB 19 wrote:

Yeah, they're gnarly if you're starting from scratch. That one exercise can single handedly keep my back pain away.....but be careful if your back and core are weak. The thing is no joke.

Definitly wouldn't suggest jumping head first into an AB roller, its one of the worst things you can do if you have little core stability. Basically guaranteed to hurt your back.

Go to PT, They'll show you some low motion ab work outs, sit ups on a medicine ball are good for stability, low dosage of planks are good to build, mountain climbers can be effective, v-sits leg extensions and leg lifts would be good too.

Look into Foundation Training, honestly it has been a life saver for me after back surgery.

Foundation Training

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8/3/2017 3:16 PM

Pallof press, anything else will load up your back too much. It's also a lot more functional than most "core" exercises, so if you're still riding it will transfer to that too.

Most of what's been mentioned is pretty intense stuff. Not sure that would help you

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8/3/2017 3:28 PM

bigmaico wrote:

Guy's:

I need some special Core Strengthening Tips!

Due to a broken back & a hernia that runs from my Zyphiod (SP) process to almost my belly button, I can't do even one sit up's !

Any Idea's ?

I've been riding my MTB & lost 35 pounds!

BTW: any want a set of inversion boots? FREE you just pay the shipping! I now have a inversion table.

First come first serve!

Yoga worked wondered foe me

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8/3/2017 4:45 PM

bigmaico wrote:

Guy's:

I need some special Core Strengthening Tips!

Due to a broken back & a hernia that runs from my Zyphiod (SP) process to almost my belly button, I can't do even one sit up's !

Any Idea's ?

I've been riding my MTB & lost 35 pounds!

BTW: any want a set of inversion boots? FREE you just pay the shipping! I now have a inversion table.

First come first serve!

Amino Neuro frequency therapy Bro will blow your mind. Will repair your body frequency's then you will gain normal movement and progress to core exercises.

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8/3/2017 4:51 PM

Finding a good therapist is good idea at first, then to transition to an educated personal trainer who is familiar in fascial connections, mobility and activation. I work with people in your position who are in between therapy and training quite often. Don't neglect the bundled up scar tissue and fascia which needs to be rolled out first, then stretched, then strengthened through activation using local, not global, total body/core exercises. As the above people said a DNS therapist and yoga is great also, as it targets these fascial meridian "cobwebs" connecting one part of the body to the other.

Since your superficial front line is obviously tight, and pulling the front of your body, I would stretch that first with yoga stretches after some myofascial release using any ball maneuvered around the border of rib cage. Throw in hip flexor stretches as well since you ride the MTB often. Then strengthening the superficial back line with some glute bridges, quadruped opposite arm leg raises or something similar.

If you want to do things on your own and rehab yourself, I suggest reading Anatomy Trains by Thomas Myers and How To Become A Supple Leopard by Kelly Starrett. Great knowledge for anybody to have if you're into healthy aging. Good luck!

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8/3/2017 4:54 PM

snowy816 wrote:

Amino Neuro frequency therapy Bro will blow your mind. Will repair your body frequency's then you will gain normal movement and progress to core exercises.

How well do these Amino Neuros work? I've heard good things and we plan on getting the credentials to use them where I work soon. Please tell me your experience. Thank you.

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8/3/2017 5:44 PM

Most people don't realize it but planking and or push ups will strengthen your core without putting a huge strain on your back. It's slower than exercises that specifically target your abs but it still works.

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