Two Stroke Pipe repair a different Way

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1/19/2018 6:32 AM

I‘ve seen a lot of Videos of Pipe repair,with
Pressure Air and Heat - with Water and Ice or Pressure Washer.
I work in a big Machine engeneering Company and
had a lot to do with Hydraulikzylinders.

So why not try with Hydraulik Pressure.
Today i make the test and it works really good.

Was a Little bit nervous about the Pressure of 50 bar, but nothing explodes.Photo

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1/19/2018 6:49 AM

Hydraulic is the ideal method to use due to the low amount of potential energy as compared to compressed gas. If hydraulic pops, it will not be as violent as compressed gas as hydraulic fluid (liquids in general) do not compress (well they do but it's very very minor). The stored energy portion would be in the expansion of the pipe itself in this case under stress.

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1/19/2018 8:58 PM

That's really neat, and definitely the ideal set up I'd say. I've heard stories from friends about shooting plugs across the block with the compressed air and heat method.

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2003 CR250R - 2006 KX250 (freessshhhh)

1/20/2018 11:21 AM

Jake_CR250R wrote:

That's really neat, and definitely the ideal set up I'd say. I've heard stories from friends about shooting plugs across the block with the compressed air and heat method.

Ya that goes to 281moto's post...if you use air, it's basically a spring inside the container, and when the container pops, the spring (pressurized air) expands until it equalizes with atmospheric pressure. Whatever is in the way goes with it too...

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1/21/2018 4:42 AM

The idea with the compressed air is the abiltity to heat the dented area in a more or less isolated fashion, when you are using a liquid to pressurise the inside its a lot harder to apply focused heat to a dent as the oil/liquid inside will absorb all of the heat you are putting into it, therefore you need to either use an extreme heat source (oxy/acetylene torch) or no heat at all in which case you won't be able to fully remove the dent.

You can use very low air pressure (20 - 30psi and thats all you really need unless your trying to get out really small dents) with high heat in small areas to relieve dents and creases if you apply the heat in the right areas, which is easy enough to learn with a little experience. Seeing as you can apply focused heat on one area using air as your force medium you can (with practise) fully remove and dents without any sign of them ever being there. Using fluids you need to run much higher pressures to get a similar result as you are acting on the entire inner surface area which honestly negates the saftey factor...

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1/21/2018 4:44 AM

I should also add that you should have a pressure gauge plumbed in on the chamber side of the air regulator so that you can monitor pressure rises inside.

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1/21/2018 7:00 AM

Slosh 112 wrote:

The idea with the compressed air is the abiltity to heat the dented area in a more or less isolated fashion, when you are using a liquid to pressurise the inside its a lot harder to apply focused heat to a dent as the oil/liquid inside will absorb all of the heat you are putting into it, therefore you need to either use an extreme heat source (oxy/acetylene torch) or no heat at all in which case you won't be able to fully remove the dent.

You can use very low air pressure (20 - 30psi and thats all you really need unless your trying to get out really small dents) with high heat in small areas to relieve dents and creases if you apply the heat in the right areas, which is easy enough to learn with a little experience. Seeing as you can apply focused heat on one area using air as your force medium you can (with practise) fully remove and dents without any sign of them ever being there. Using fluids you need to run much higher pressures to get a similar result as you are acting on the entire inner surface area which honestly negates the saftey factor...

I dont use any heat, just the Oil and a Hydraulik Pump and was able to remove 95% of the Dents.

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1/21/2018 4:44 PM

50bar?, isn't that like 700 psi?, no way give me a torch a couple of expandable replacement freeze out plugs, modify one with a tire valve a foot pump with gauge. easy peasy. heat cherry red, pump enough to take out dent. takes maybe 20 psi most of the time.

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1/22/2018 4:12 PM

Do you have any photos after the dents were removed?

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1/23/2018 9:22 PM

tuggy450 wrote:

50bar?, isn't that like 700 psi?, no way give me a torch a couple of expandable replacement freeze out plugs, modify one with a tire valve a foot pump with gauge. easy peasy. heat cherry red, pump enough to take out dent. takes maybe 20 psi most of the time.

At 20 psi with air I am standing behind a peice of expanded metal, if anything goes wrong. At 50 bar (725.189 psi) , I am standing outside the building.

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1/24/2018 8:32 AM

tuggy450 wrote:

50bar?, isn't that like 700 psi?, no way give me a torch a couple of expandable replacement freeze out plugs, modify one with a tire valve a foot pump with gauge. easy peasy. heat cherry red, pump enough to take out dent. takes maybe 20 psi most of the time.

r.sal923 wrote:

At 20 psi with air I am standing behind a peice of expanded metal, if anything goes wrong. At 50 bar (725.189 psi) , I am standing outside the building.

As a professional the liquid is interesting but how do you keep it from expanding everywhere instead of the dented area?

When using air I always monitored while heating as the air expands and pressure increases .... so you bleed some pressure off as needed. I used rubber expansion plugs and hose clamps for safety and 1 plug had a tire valve stem with a pressure gage on it.

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1/24/2018 10:25 AM

I have a Pressure Gauge on the Pump and i try to pump very slowly 5-10-15-20.... Bar.
The Dents move out at 10-15 Bar but i want to test what is Possible and go up to 50 Bar, with a big safety Distance.

At 50 Bar the pipe expands like a balloon but nothing explodes.

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1/24/2018 4:59 PM

I can't believe the welds wouldn't crack and start leaking if the pressure is high enough to stretch the pipe like a balloon. Holy cow.

Anyway, seems like a good way to remove dents. I guess my only minor concern would be what do you do with the used fluid dirty with pipe carbon and how do you clean all the oil out of the pipe before putting it back on the bike? Almost seems like more hassle than it's worth.

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1/24/2018 10:16 PM

FGR01 wrote:

I can't believe the welds wouldn't crack and start leaking if the pressure is high enough to stretch the pipe like a balloon. Holy cow.

Anyway, seems like a good way to remove dents. I guess my only minor concern would be what do you do with the used fluid dirty with pipe carbon and how do you clean all the oil out of the pipe before putting it back on the bike? Almost seems like more hassle than it's worth.

In the Company i work we did a lot of machine Overhauls so i have all the Equipment for
Repair, Rebuilt and Cleaning so for me its easy.

You are right its a lot of work but here in Austria we have 6 Month Winter so i have enough Time

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