Turned down hub strength

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3/3/2018 8:50 PM

So I'm considering turning down the hubs on my kx250. I've seen pictures of others hubs while searching this subject but what I haven't seen is anything regarding structural strength. Aftermarket hubs are made out of a solid block of aluminum while turned down are cleaned up cast... I don't think the manufacturer would design the ribs for looks. So has there been any strength testing after the turning process has been done?

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3/3/2018 9:20 PM

Faster USA says they won't turn hubs. I think for the reason you mentioned.

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The older I get, the faster I was.

3/3/2018 10:26 PM

captmoto wrote:

Faster USA says they won't turn hubs. I think for the reason you mentioned.

Maybe there is a engineer on here that can comment?

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3/4/2018 5:49 AM

Any removal of material would be removal of strength. The ribs don’t matter, but taking material from everywhere will.

You could put your’s on a lathe and use sandpaper from rough to fine and polish them. After that, you could anodized them and they will be shiny where polished, and more of a matte anodized where it’s cast.

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If you're not mixing gas, you're not haulin ass.

3/4/2018 6:02 AM

OEMs design the hubs to be strong the way they are. When you start taking the ribs off a casting and then removing material to get a smooth finish you weaken the hubs greatly. Castings arent as strong as billet aluminum in the first place. The ribs absolutely add strength to the castings. I use ribs frequently in my designs on dies. FasterUSA is right for not turning them down.

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3/4/2018 7:22 AM

kb228 wrote:

OEMs design the hubs to be strong the way they are. When you start taking the ribs off a casting and then removing material to get a smooth finish you weaken the hubs greatly. Castings arent as strong as billet aluminum in the first place. The ribs absolutely add strength to the castings. I use ribs frequently in my designs on dies. FasterUSA is right for not turning them down.

That was my feelings as well. I guess I won't be going through with it.

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3/5/2018 8:55 AM

kb228 wrote:

OEMs design the hubs to be strong the way they are. When you start taking the ribs off a casting and then removing material to get a smooth finish you weaken the hubs greatly. Castings arent as strong as billet aluminum in the first place. The ribs absolutely add strength to the castings. I use ribs frequently in my designs on dies. FasterUSA is right for not turning them down.

Those aren't ribs by design intent, they are a product of the casting process.

Unless you are talking about ribs designed in, like in this picture?

[LINK TO IMAGE]

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3/5/2018 10:12 AM

kb228 wrote:

OEMs design the hubs to be strong the way they are. When you start taking the ribs off a casting and then removing material to get a smooth finish you weaken the hubs greatly. Castings arent as strong as billet aluminum in the first place. The ribs absolutely add strength to the castings. I use ribs frequently in my designs on dies. FasterUSA is right for not turning them down.

seth505 wrote:

Those aren't ribs by design intent, they are a product of the casting process.

Unless you are talking about ribs designed in, like in this picture?

[LINK TO IMAGE]

Yep those are what i had in mind. Not the ones from the patterns.

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3/5/2018 10:50 AM

kb228 wrote:

OEMs design the hubs to be strong the way they are. When you start taking the ribs off a casting and then removing material to get a smooth finish you weaken the hubs greatly. Castings arent as strong as billet aluminum in the first place. The ribs absolutely add strength to the castings. I use ribs frequently in my designs on dies. FasterUSA is right for not turning them down.

seth505 wrote:

Those aren't ribs by design intent, they are a product of the casting process.

Unless you are talking about ribs designed in, like in this picture?

[LINK TO IMAGE]

So are you saying the ribs running length wise with the hub are from the casting process and have nothing to do with strength?

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3/5/2018 1:06 PM

Stock KTM hubs are turned down. I'm sure they have added material for that though.

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3/5/2018 1:28 PM

What you can do on the long sides is polish them. Thats not going to hurt anything. Those “seams” down the sides is from the foam/sand mold. It splits apart into 4 pieces after they cast the hub

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3/6/2018 7:18 AM

I've cut the ribs off of the RM250 inner hubs and polished them down and had them anodized plenty of times and never had an issue with any of them. TCR wheels was doing it long before I started doing it.

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