Thread damage oil drain plug..

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1/16/2020 9:49 AM

Hello guys,

So i was changing oil today, when i was about to tighten my oil drain plug, my
torque wrench for some reason did not work. Before i new it, it was very tight! I loosened the plug and tried to torque it again, but now i can’t… I tried to take pictures of the threads… What should I do? I got plenty of time before racing, so I’m in no rush, but would really appreciate some help/advice on this screw up…





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1/16/2020 10:17 AM

If you have plenty of time the correct way would be to disassemble the cases and either drill and tap the hole larger, or weld it up and retap it to the original size...

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1/16/2020 10:19 AM

i am no mechanic! So that i cant do.. though about a thread repair set? But i dont know if anyone has tried that before on their case?

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1/16/2020 10:24 AM
Edited Date/Time: 1/16/2020 10:28 AM

I’m assuming you’re talking about helicoil Thread repair kits... They still require drilling the hole and tapping it larger... They’re Also not the best idea on a non blind hole... You can try to catch many of the aluminum filings by coating the drill bit/ tap with grease and going slow... but i cannot recommend that because you will still end up with some filings inside the case...

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1/16/2020 10:27 AM

The drilling is no problem as long as i go slow i guess.. m thinkign about using some cheap gear oil to flush awfterwards to get rid of the fillings

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1/16/2020 10:29 AM

ezmoto wrote:

The drilling is no problem as long as i go slow i guess.. m thinkign about using some cheap gear oil to flush awfterwards to get rid of the fillings

If you’re going that route... drill and tap the hole larger don’t use a helicoil...

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1/16/2020 10:31 AM

What do u mean by "tap the hole larger" After drilling the threads clean of course.

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1/16/2020 10:31 AM

Its not too bad. Get a helicoil kit from oreillys auto. Or you can order a timesert online. Either will work and are commonly used for this exact repair. Simply drill and retap the hole and install the insert. Theres directions on the box or im sure youtube has something. Use a wax or grease to drill and tap your holes - not tap lube. The wax or grease will trap loose pieces.

Next time dont use a torque wrench. Hand tight right on the “head” of your ratchet - not the handle is good enough for those bolts. Drain holes are easy to strip. I like to go by feel rather than a torque wrench on these.

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1/16/2020 10:33 AM

ezmoto wrote:

What do u mean by "tap the hole larger" After drilling the threads clean of course.

Should just say drill and tap the hole to the new drain plug size...

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1/16/2020 11:02 AM

kb228 wrote:

Its not too bad. Get a helicoil kit from oreillys auto. Or you can order a timesert online. Either will work and are commonly used for this exact repair. Simply drill and retap the hole and install the insert. Theres directions on the box or im sure youtube has something. Use a wax or grease to drill and tap your holes - not tap lube. The wax or grease will trap loose pieces.

Next time dont use a torque wrench. Hand tight right on the “head” of your ratchet - not the handle is good enough for those bolts. Drain holes are easy to strip. I like to go by feel rather than a torque wrench on these.

i have tightened the bolt again, it gets tight, but i can maximum get 20 n/m before it gets loose. i dont know if thats enough, because the threads are still f**cked, or if i should let i be that way

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1/16/2020 11:13 AM

kb228 wrote:

Its not too bad. Get a helicoil kit from oreillys auto. Or you can order a timesert online. Either will work and are commonly used for this exact repair. Simply drill and retap the hole and install the insert. Theres directions on the box or im sure youtube has something. Use a wax or grease to drill and tap your holes - not tap lube. The wax or grease will trap loose pieces.

Next time dont use a torque wrench. Hand tight right on the “head” of your ratchet - not the handle is good enough for those bolts. Drain holes are easy to strip. I like to go by feel rather than a torque wrench on these.

ezmoto wrote:

i have tightened the bolt again, it gets tight, but i can maximum get 20 n/m before it gets loose. i dont know if thats enough, because the threads are still f**cked, or if i should let i be that way

Id go ahead and just put an insert in. Using the damaged threads will just make it worse and cause a leak. This is a cheap and easy repair. Dont be lazy.

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1/16/2020 11:42 AM

kb228 wrote:

Its not too bad. Get a helicoil kit from oreillys auto. Or you can order a timesert online. Either will work and are commonly used for this exact repair. Simply drill and retap the hole and install the insert. Theres directions on the box or im sure youtube has something. Use a wax or grease to drill and tap your holes - not tap lube. The wax or grease will trap loose pieces.

Next time dont use a torque wrench. Hand tight right on the “head” of your ratchet - not the handle is good enough for those bolts. Drain holes are easy to strip. I like to go by feel rather than a torque wrench on these.

ezmoto wrote:

i have tightened the bolt again, it gets tight, but i can maximum get 20 n/m before it gets loose. i dont know if thats enough, because the threads are still f**cked, or if i should let i be that way

kb228 wrote:

Id go ahead and just put an insert in. Using the damaged threads will just make it worse and cause a leak. This is a cheap and easy repair. Dont be lazy.

An insert? what is that?

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1/17/2020 1:11 AM

When cutting a new thread into the unopened engine all grease or wax does not catch all the swarf but blowing into the engine constantly with high pressure air does. Close the engine breather and put the airline into the oil filler hole. All the swarf is blown out the hole while you are cutting the new thread so be prepared and wear goggles. if this is a metric screw with 12mm you might get away with threadcutting to a 1/2" x 20 TPI screw. This will only take out a little more metal and should reduce the risc of cutting the new thread at the wrong angle and thus the sealing washer will never seal again....

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1/17/2020 7:35 AM

Remember one thing before you attempt to do a drilling operation on that case....The case material where the drain is located is really very thin. In your photo you will see that the material does go into the case a good bit in length, but it is no more than about 4 mm thick. With this in mind, any drilling or inserts installed there may not hold and in fact may break the case off.
The only real sure fire fix is to replace the case as anything less will only compromise your case and lead to an instant failure at some time in the future and the results could cause injury to the rider.
I know this is not what you wanted to hear....

Paw Paw

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1/17/2020 7:49 AM

UPDATE:

Went out looking at it yesterday again, and it looks like something broke in the thread?! is this thing broken of, or is it just how it looks?? i did not tighten it that hard so i cant really undersyand this...

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1/17/2020 8:06 AM
Edited Date/Time: 1/17/2020 8:07 AM

kb228 wrote:

Its not too bad. Get a helicoil kit from oreillys auto. Or you can order a timesert online. Either will work and are commonly used for this exact repair. Simply drill and retap the hole and install the insert. Theres directions on the box or im sure youtube has something. Use a wax or grease to drill and tap your holes - not tap lube. The wax or grease will trap loose pieces.

Next time dont use a torque wrench. Hand tight right on the “head” of your ratchet - not the handle is good enough for those bolts. Drain holes are easy to strip. I like to go by feel rather than a torque wrench on these.

Same here. I thread the drain plug in by hand. throw a wrench on it. Once it start to feel snug I just give it one extra little twist and then its good to go. I only use a small 5 inch wrench so I don't put a lot of torque on the bolt. Run the bike for a few mins and check for leaks. I always take a look after the fist few laps at the track. Make sure there are no leaks after getting the motor hot.



I also tend to not replace the crush washers that often. It hate the feeling when it starts to flatten out. Feels like the plug is about to strip.

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1/17/2020 8:16 AM

What bike is this? If it is a 2-stroke you can reduce the problems with the aluminum shavings by flushing the tranny a few times with diesel or kerosene before putting oil back in. Do the grease on the tap, install an insert, then flush a few times. Seen this many times with no problems.

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Powerband in every gear !

1/17/2020 8:17 AM

FGR01 wrote:

What bike is this? If it is a 2-stroke you can reduce the problems with the aluminum shavings by flushing the tranny a few times with diesel or kerosene before putting oil back in. Do the grease on the tap, install an insert, then flush a few times. Seen this many times with no problems.

Damn ur comment makes me believe this can be saved :D - Yes its a 250 yz (2 stroke)

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1/17/2020 8:38 AM

ezmoto wrote:

Damn ur comment makes me believe this can be saved :D - Yes its a 250 yz (2 stroke)

If it was me, I'd also remove the right cover, and clutch assembly before doing the tap and flush. Just to eliminate the places shavings can get to and also to give better access to pour diesel in and ensure it flushes any shavings out the drain hole. Also to prevent getting diesel on the clutch plates, not that it will really hurt them.

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Powerband in every gear !

1/17/2020 8:51 AM
Edited Date/Time: 1/17/2020 8:53 AM

ezmoto wrote:

UPDATE:

Went out looking at it yesterday again, and it looks like something broke in the thread?! is this thing broken of, or is it just how it looks?? i did not tighten it that hard so i cant really undersyand this...

That is one of the drain holes in the threads so that the majority of the oil can be drained. This is due to that very thin elevated portion of the case where the plug threads into. If you look very close, you will see the edge of the hole where the elevated portion of the case is shown and just how thin it is.

Paw Paw

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1/17/2020 8:53 AM

ezmoto wrote:

UPDATE:

Went out looking at it yesterday again, and it looks like something broke in the thread?! is this thing broken of, or is it just how it looks?? i did not tighten it that hard so i cant really undersyand this...

Paw Paw 271 wrote:

That is one of the drain holes in the threads so that the majority of the oil can be drained. This is due to that very thin elevated portion of the case where the plug threads into. If you look very close, you will see the edge of the hole where the elevated portion of the case is shown and just how thin it is.

Paw Paw

So it is supposed to be there? im kinda a rookie when it comes to the mechanics

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1/17/2020 8:55 AM

Yes it should be there.

Paw Paw

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1/17/2020 8:58 AM

Paw Paw 271 wrote:

Yes it should be there.

Paw Paw

Thank god for u Paw Paw! i had a minor heart attack when i first noticed it...

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