SDI low friction shock piston bushing KX450

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10/16/2020 8:47 AM

Anyone have experience replacing the piston band with the SDI "low friction" bushing? My goal is to have the shock move a little more freely.

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10/16/2020 4:34 PM

I have ran them on ktm's . It will slide more freely. Feels like a low speed shim was removed from the stack.

Noticed it more on compression than rebound for what that is worth. Track hack will have a slightly improved feel.

Never used one on a shock with a bladder but I assume results would be similar.




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10/16/2020 8:05 PM

Really great "bang for the buck" on KYB and Showa shocks. Use them all the time.

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10/16/2020 8:39 PM

They are better than OEM? Do they hold up as well?
I’m due here soon for a service soon so was thinking of going with this one. If you recommend them Mr Robinson I’m game to try 👍🏻

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10/17/2020 6:28 AM

I'm very impressed with them. The stock band set up is super tight on the KYB and these really take a lot of the resistance out of the shaft movement. Like "mxracer515" said it's almost like you changed the valving. When I put them in for guys just getting regular service they think I did some sort of magic to their shock.

Being they are a bushing I don't think they have the service life of the stock band, but after a couple of years of using them they seem to be holding up really well. At only $15 you can easily afford to replace them at every service if you need that peace of mind.

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10/17/2020 8:29 AM

Great, it will be 2 weeks before I can try it out but I'll post a reply.

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10/17/2020 8:53 AM

How do you guys take the old band off?

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10/17/2020 10:40 AM

Cut it with a box cutter.

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10/17/2020 11:11 AM

That’s what I did. I also read to wrap the new installed band really tight with electrical tape then put it in the freezer for a bit. I have no idea if that helps with anything, but it didn’t hurt to try

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10/17/2020 12:23 PM

Yeah, that's a good trick for the stock bands, but with the SDI band you don't need to do any tricks to install it. It's a metal bushing type band and goes on just like an inner tube bushing. You just cut the old band off and replace the o-rings with the new ones that come with the SDI band and slip it on.

No need to fight it or do any voodoo to get it on and fit properly. So simple a caveman can do it.

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10/17/2020 1:17 PM

Mr. Robinson wrote:

Yeah, that's a good trick for the stock bands, but with the SDI band you don't need to do any tricks to install it. It's a metal bushing type band and goes on just like an inner tube bushing. You just cut the old band off and replace the o-rings with the new ones that come with the SDI band and slip it on.

No need to fight it or do any voodoo to get it on and fit properly. So simple a caveman can do it.

That’s good to know. I’ll be ordering some of those

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10/17/2020 5:22 PM

Make sure to replace often and keep fresh seal head bushings when using the DU piston bands. I've had more than one come in for service that had smoked the inside of the shock body due to loose tolerances.

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10/17/2020 5:27 PM

slipdog wrote:

Make sure to replace often and keep fresh seal head bushings when using the DU piston bands. I've had more than one come in for service that had smoked the inside of the shock body due to loose tolerances.

That's interesting and worrying. How many hours are we talking?

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10/17/2020 5:27 PM

slipdog wrote:

Make sure to replace often and keep fresh seal head bushings when using the DU piston bands. I've had more than one come in for service that had smoked the inside of the shock body due to loose tolerances.

And how difficult is it to swap the shaft bushing in the seal head?

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10/17/2020 5:33 PM

slipdog wrote:

Make sure to replace often and keep fresh seal head bushings when using the DU piston bands. I've had more than one come in for service that had smoked the inside of the shock body due to loose tolerances.

Bruce372 wrote:

And how difficult is it to swap the shaft bushing in the seal head?

The bushing can be easily pressed in and out with a vice after you pry up the dust seal and bumper from the seal head. They are almost always worn because most don't service their shock enough. Many times the leading edge is worn down to the metal. They're usually only about $5 also...

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10/17/2020 6:21 PM

Interesting, haven't seen any issues like that here.

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10/18/2020 8:14 AM

Mr. Robinson wrote:

I'm very impressed with them. The stock band set up is super tight on the KYB and these really take a lot of the resistance out of the shaft movement. Like "mxracer515" said it's almost like you changed the valving. When I put them in for guys just getting regular service they think I did some sort of magic to their shock.

Being they are a bushing I don't think they have the service life of the stock band, but after a couple of years of using them they seem to be holding up really well. At only $15 you can easily afford to replace them at every service if you need that peace of mind.

It feels like you changed the valving because you are putting a split piston band on...oil is literally passing through the band.

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