Rekluse Explanantion

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12/27/2018 11:59 AM

I have searched and I cant find the answer.

I know the Rekluse expands and tightens the packs from the inside out rather then from the outside in with a pressure plate.

1. What is exactly happening inside the clutch when you check free gain. I know that the RPMs are expanding the EXP causing the pack to compress but what is causing the clutch lever to move? Is the pressure plate getting pulled out as if you were pulling the lever? Why does it only do it with pressure on the lever?

2. When you are starting in first gear I am assuming the pressure plate doesnt move at all, there is enough room for the plates to slide and as the EXP it expands it tightens them up. I dont know how they arent already compressed with the pressure plate not activated?

Sorry for the questions but I cant wrap my head around this and I havent been able to get this explained.

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12/27/2018 12:37 PM

Deltek44 wrote:

I have searched and I cant find the answer.

I know the Rekluse expands and tightens the packs from the inside out rather then from the outside in with a pressure plate.

1. What is exactly happening inside the clutch when you check free gain. I know that the RPMs are expanding the EXP causing the pack to compress but what is causing the clutch lever to move? Is the pressure plate getting pulled out as if you were pulling the lever? Why does it only do it with pressure on the lever?

2. When you are starting in first gear I am assuming the pressure plate doesnt move at all, there is enough room for the plates to slide and as the EXP it expands it tightens them up. I dont know how they arent already compressed with the pressure plate not activated?

Sorry for the questions but I cant wrap my head around this and I havent been able to get this explained.

best to look at the manual where it shows a cross section of the clutch assembly as you will get a better understanding of it.

Basically you have it correct with the recluse bit expanding and closing the gaps between the clutch plates. The free play gain is the total gap(s) between the plates and the pressure plate. When the lever isn't pulled the pressure plate acts stationary so the slave adjustment moves the pressure plate either closer to the rekluse and clutch pack to close up the FPG or away to increase it.

this is why the heavier spring is used for higher power motors, they produce more rotational force which throw the wedges out further for a given RPM which deflects the pressure plate away, effectively creating extra FPG and as a result slip.

once you get a better understanding of this you will get a better handle on the I, II, and III spring preload settings and what they can do for you

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12/27/2018 3:15 PM

Heaver weights are also available. I added these to my unit on my 450 and then used the softest springs to get the feel I wanted.

Paw Paw

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12/27/2018 3:28 PM

The heavier weights do two things, they throw out sooner to engage at a lower RPM (prevent freewheeling on decel) and throw out harder to prevent slip.

The lighter springs make the heavier weights throw out even sooner. This can cause issues of excessive drag at idle, especially on two strokes

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12/27/2018 9:42 PM

Have they created a version yet that absolutely feels and performs identical to a normal clutch yet with all the benefits of not allowing the bike to stall?

I ask because with each version people swear it is like this but it really isn't. Then the next version comes and "oh this is finally the one". Until it isn't and they make a new version. So, I ask this question every few years in hopes they might actually be there.

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Powerband in every gear !

12/28/2018 12:34 AM

They have years ago...if you know how to adjust and tune them correct. Disregard what the manual says and they work much better.

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12/28/2018 7:28 AM

hmmmm, didn't know they had heavier weights. Looked on the site, couldn't find any info.

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12/29/2018 3:02 PM

I just installed a Radius CX and I love it. I have mine setup for the external free play gain adjustment at the moment. I do feel that the lever has a heavier pull. I’m considering switching to the internal adjustment to try that out. Anybody have an opinion either way on how to set it up?

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12/29/2018 4:43 PM
Edited Date/Time: 12/29/2018 4:46 PM

Not sure what you mean by external and internal adjustment but i'll give you a run down of the options you have.

slave cylinder adjuster - sets the pre load ie: how much slip at idle the rekluse disc has. Set it so the bike wants to chug forward at idle but not enough that it actually moves with you on it. Disregard the rubber band method rekluse mention as you will end up with too much free wheel when backing off the throttle.

I, II and III bolt holes on the pressure plate - This controls a couple of things, it impacts the lever pull. Imagine in post II the spring is neutral, now imagine in pos III the spring is over centre, this will make the lever easier to pull in as the spring is already past top dead centre so to speak. Now imagine the spring is in pos I which relates to the spring not fully compressed flat, this will make the lever stiffer to pull in as you have to compress the spring flat that tiny amount before making it go past TDC and get easier.
Now the same thing applies to slip, if the spring is past TDC or past being flat the rekluse disc will find it easier to push the pressure plate back and potentially allow the clutch to slip. Now if the spring was in pos I (not quite fully flat) the rekluse disc has more work to overcome spring pressure and force the pressure plate back and allow the clutch to slip. This is why the more powerful bikes come with the 280lb spring. It helps against slip but when set in the same pos as the lighter spring rates to a stiffer lever feel.

Rekluse Weights - these are the centrifugal weights which fly out and push the rekluse plates apart to close up the free play in the clutch packs. more weight + fly out harder and sooner. Generally the weights that come with your model clutch are the best and far easier to tune via the little coloured springs. I done a heap of testing with springs and learnt a lot. 450/500 4 stokes use lighter springs than 2 strokes. 250/300 2 strokes come standard with "heavy" wedges. If you use the lighter weights from a 500 or 350 the clutch will slip....and if you use heavier weights in the 4 strokes the clutch will engage quicker which overall isn't a bad feeling. Blip of the throttle will instantly lift the wheel from idle, good for pivot turns etc.

Coloured springs - these change the engagement point (with no weight changes) basically like a stall convertor or how much free revs the bike has before the clutch starts to engage. Lighter springs = less free revs.

once you get your head around these you will be a able to tune the clutch better and also understand how one change can effect more than one area of adjustment. ie: if you use the heavier coloured springs you can get away will slightly more free play gain or slip at idle. This is because the weights will fly out further when revved compared to when at idle.

Same goes for lever feel, many guys complain of the harder lever pull after fitting the rekluse, this doesn't worry me because i don't use a clutch lever. Think about something here, the lever is the same, fluid is the same, pressure plate spring is the same, hydraulic ratio on slave is the same etc....see where i'm going with this? the only variable is the pressure plate spring position compared to stock, maybe stock is past TDC so when you pull the lever it is easier to over centre the spring.

My suggestions for trouble free recluse use are.
- change oil frequent, they slip and get hot and cook the oil
- disregard the rubber band FPG setup method
- adjust FPG to load up engine at idle, but not enough to actually move the bike
- make sure the rekluse disc is installed int he square slots in the hub, they will fit in the shorter slots and give you setup problems
- install the 280lb spring to help prevent high RPM/load slip but adjust the pressure plate spring position I, II or III for best lever feel FOR YOU
- if you don't use a clutch lever (convert if to LHRB etc) then remove the slave piston and just use a 6mm bolt and bung the fluid port. This way you get no change if the piston bypasses fluid or the fluid gets hot and expands giving you more FPG.
- test, test and test. The biggest changes come from the coloured springs and they are cheap, buy 6 of each and experiment to what works for you best.

I like a clutch that doesn't freewheel when backing iff the throttle right to idle. I also like a clutch that has no slip before engagement so when i blip the throttle the bike to responds instantly.

understand one change effects more than one adjustment. I set my bike up to have heavier wedges, heavier 280lb spring, heavier coloured springs. Lever feel isn't something I care about so my primary setup is based around no slip when engaged.

Consider a change from normal to heavy weights (or vice versa on a 2 stroke), with no change to the coloured springs the heavier weights will naturally fly out further at idle. Say with normal weight they fly out to 20% of their possible travel before the coloured springs equalise their force for that given RPM. Then if you change to a heavier spring the weight will now maybe fly out to 40% of its possible travel. This means the heavier springs will require a large FPG setting or more space between the clutch discs, now then you crack the throttle the weights will fly out to their maximum travel (centrifugal force) and compress the coloured springs, the heavier weights have less available travel available to close up the FPG/clutch disc gaps which may cause the clutch to slip when peak torque is reached. Now go back to pressure plate positioning, if the spring is setup for light lever feel then you might find the slip even easier. For this situation you have a couple of options, adjust the spring spread to make it harder for the disc to compress the spring and make lever feel harder. Another option is to install the heavier pressure plate spring in the position past TDC to give a lighter lever feel or third option is to go to a heavier coloured spring. By doing so will limit the amount the heavier weight can fly out at idle and give it more available travel for when the throttle is cracked. This also won't effect lever feel.

also take not, Rekluse has changed the recommended "medium" coloured spring settings for the 250/300 2 strokes for 17+. It took me a few weeks to work this out for myself through trial and error that rekluse had it wrong. the old manuals stated the medium was 3 seal/3 silver and heavy was 6 silver. they now list medium as 6 silver...

good luck, they work great when setup correct and i totally see what people hate them, primarily because a lot aren't setup correct. A well setup rekluse will operate almost no different to the stock clutch in both lever feel and performance. Personally I don't have a problem using a clutch lever, I have rode for 30 years using one but the primary reason I love my recluses are the ability to not have a clutch lever and convert it to a LHRB. This is a game changer FOR ME as I get far better braking control using my hand than my foot on steep declines. The no stalling function can work wonders for using a motocross bike in the bush in technical riding where the light switch clutch can make things hard.


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12/29/2018 5:14 PM

bowser wrote:

Not sure what you mean by external and internal adjustment but i'll give you a run down of the options you have.

slave cylinder adjuster - sets the pre load ie: how much slip at idle the rekluse disc has. Set it so the bike wants to chug forward at idle but not enough that it actually moves with you on it. Disregard the rubber band method rekluse mention as you will end up with too much free wheel when backing off the throttle.

I, II and III bolt holes on the pressure plate - This controls a couple of things, it impacts the lever pull. Imagine in post II the spring is neutral, now imagine in pos III the spring is over centre, this will make the lever easier to pull in as the spring is already past top dead centre so to speak. Now imagine the spring is in pos I which relates to the spring not fully compressed flat, this will make the lever stiffer to pull in as you have to compress the spring flat that tiny amount before making it go past TDC and get easier.
Now the same thing applies to slip, if the spring is past TDC or past being flat the rekluse disc will find it easier to push the pressure plate back and potentially allow the clutch to slip. Now if the spring was in pos I (not quite fully flat) the rekluse disc has more work to overcome spring pressure and force the pressure plate back and allow the clutch to slip. This is why the more powerful bikes come with the 280lb spring. It helps against slip but when set in the same pos as the lighter spring rates to a stiffer lever feel.

Rekluse Weights - these are the centrifugal weights which fly out and push the rekluse plates apart to close up the free play in the clutch packs. more weight + fly out harder and sooner. Generally the weights that come with your model clutch are the best and far easier to tune via the little coloured springs. I done a heap of testing with springs and learnt a lot. 450/500 4 stokes use lighter springs than 2 strokes. 250/300 2 strokes come standard with "heavy" wedges. If you use the lighter weights from a 500 or 350 the clutch will slip....and if you use heavier weights in the 4 strokes the clutch will engage quicker which overall isn't a bad feeling. Blip of the throttle will instantly lift the wheel from idle, good for pivot turns etc.

Coloured springs - these change the engagement point (with no weight changes) basically like a stall convertor or how much free revs the bike has before the clutch starts to engage. Lighter springs = less free revs.

once you get your head around these you will be a able to tune the clutch better and also understand how one change can effect more than one area of adjustment. ie: if you use the heavier coloured springs you can get away will slightly more free play gain or slip at idle. This is because the weights will fly out further when revved compared to when at idle.

Same goes for lever feel, many guys complain of the harder lever pull after fitting the rekluse, this doesn't worry me because i don't use a clutch lever. Think about something here, the lever is the same, fluid is the same, pressure plate spring is the same, hydraulic ratio on slave is the same etc....see where i'm going with this? the only variable is the pressure plate spring position compared to stock, maybe stock is past TDC so when you pull the lever it is easier to over centre the spring.

My suggestions for trouble free recluse use are.
- change oil frequent, they slip and get hot and cook the oil
- disregard the rubber band FPG setup method
- adjust FPG to load up engine at idle, but not enough to actually move the bike
- make sure the rekluse disc is installed int he square slots in the hub, they will fit in the shorter slots and give you setup problems
- install the 280lb spring to help prevent high RPM/load slip but adjust the pressure plate spring position I, II or III for best lever feel FOR YOU
- if you don't use a clutch lever (convert if to LHRB etc) then remove the slave piston and just use a 6mm bolt and bung the fluid port. This way you get no change if the piston bypasses fluid or the fluid gets hot and expands giving you more FPG.
- test, test and test. The biggest changes come from the coloured springs and they are cheap, buy 6 of each and experiment to what works for you best.

I like a clutch that doesn't freewheel when backing iff the throttle right to idle. I also like a clutch that has no slip before engagement so when i blip the throttle the bike to responds instantly.

understand one change effects more than one adjustment. I set my bike up to have heavier wedges, heavier 280lb spring, heavier coloured springs. Lever feel isn't something I care about so my primary setup is based around no slip when engaged.

Consider a change from normal to heavy weights (or vice versa on a 2 stroke), with no change to the coloured springs the heavier weights will naturally fly out further at idle. Say with normal weight they fly out to 20% of their possible travel before the coloured springs equalise their force for that given RPM. Then if you change to a heavier spring the weight will now maybe fly out to 40% of its possible travel. This means the heavier springs will require a large FPG setting or more space between the clutch discs, now then you crack the throttle the weights will fly out to their maximum travel (centrifugal force) and compress the coloured springs, the heavier weights have less available travel available to close up the FPG/clutch disc gaps which may cause the clutch to slip when peak torque is reached. Now go back to pressure plate positioning, if the spring is setup for light lever feel then you might find the slip even easier. For this situation you have a couple of options, adjust the spring spread to make it harder for the disc to compress the spring and make lever feel harder. Another option is to install the heavier pressure plate spring in the position past TDC to give a lighter lever feel or third option is to go to a heavier coloured spring. By doing so will limit the amount the heavier weight can fly out at idle and give it more available travel for when the throttle is cracked. This also won't effect lever feel.

also take not, Rekluse has changed the recommended "medium" coloured spring settings for the 250/300 2 strokes for 17+. It took me a few weeks to work this out for myself through trial and error that rekluse had it wrong. the old manuals stated the medium was 3 seal/3 silver and heavy was 6 silver. they now list medium as 6 silver...

good luck, they work great when setup correct and i totally see what people hate them, primarily because a lot aren't setup correct. A well setup rekluse will operate almost no different to the stock clutch in both lever feel and performance. Personally I don't have a problem using a clutch lever, I have rode for 30 years using one but the primary reason I love my recluses are the ability to not have a clutch lever and convert it to a LHRB. This is a game changer FOR ME as I get far better braking control using my hand than my foot on steep declines. The no stalling function can work wonders for using a motocross bike in the bush in technical riding where the light switch clutch can make things hard.


I have an 18 CRF450 and just installed a Radius cx. The internal and external adjustments I’m referring to are for Free play gain. If adjusted internally (by unlocking the pin and spinning the adjustment ring tighter into the pressure plate) you maintain lever free play or “cable slack”, but all adjustments must be made within the clutch. External adjustment setup is all done at the cable but requires constant tension on the clutch cable. Cable has no slack and is slightly stiffer. I was just looking for peoples experiences regarding the two setups. I’ll have to poor over your info for tips. I just jumped into this world and I’m trying to learn.

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12/30/2018 12:37 AM

Ah ok, I had one like that in my crf250r. As much of a pain as it is you really need to adjust the FPG by the internal bit not by the cable. You need cable slack and the cable will stretch.
Just lay the bike on it's side so you don't lose oil when removing the cover. Once set up you should have trouble free adjustment for years

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12/30/2018 2:21 AM
Edited Date/Time: 12/30/2018 4:16 AM

FPG is what happens when the exp disc expands and forces the clutch stack against the pressure plate, overriding the springs and pushes the pressure plate back, thus allowing the push rod to move away and allow free play at the lever.

The lever only moves with pressure (i.e the rubber band) because there is no spring or any mechanism to make the clutch push rod follow the pressure plate as the EXP disc expands and pushes the pressure plate back. The EXP disc is limited to just a few mm's of movement, so if your FPG isn't at its optimum you won't be able to compress the stack adequately and the clutch will slip....too little FPG and the EXP disc isn't compressing the stack and will cause slip. Too much FPG will mean that the clutch will drag. I hope that makes some kind of sense.

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1/2/2019 10:12 AM

bowser wrote:

They have years ago...if you know how to adjust and tune them correct. Disregard what the manual says and they work much better.

From everything I've just read above it sounds as if they are still not there. You say lever feel doesn't matter to you but it does to me. I want it to feel exactly as stock. None of this BS with it being "slightly harder" or no play, etc. I want to be able to ride the bike on an MX track, feather the clutch with 1 or 2 fingers, pull it in for free wheeling when need be, drop it for a big power hit at times and basically be able to ride the bike and not tell any difference whatsoever other than I can lock up the back wheel and never stall.

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Powerband in every gear !

1/2/2019 3:39 PM

bowser wrote:

They have years ago...if you know how to adjust and tune them correct. Disregard what the manual says and they work much better.

FGR01 wrote:

From everything I've just read above it sounds as if they are still not there. You say lever feel doesn't matter to you but it does to me. I want it to feel exactly as stock. None of this BS with it being "slightly harder" or no play, etc. I want to be able to ride the bike on an MX track, feather the clutch with 1 or 2 fingers, pull it in for free wheeling when need be, drop it for a big power hit at times and basically be able to ride the bike and not tell any difference whatsoever other than I can lock up the back wheel and never stall.

Well after some tuning and switching to the internal adjustment method that is exactly what I fee I have. unfortunately I have had much time on mine yet. Ohio winter sucks.

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