Improving 15' RMZ 450 Stability, Ride Engineering?

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10/20/2018 4:20 PM
Edited Date/Time: 10/20/2018 8:33 PM

Whats up guys! I have a 2015 RMZ 450. I really like most things about the bike after only 5 hours on it (bike only has 5 hours on it too, its new) and I have gotten a setting that works well for me in the air fork since I am a heavy guy and these are fairly stiff. However I am having a problem with the bike pitching forward and back in deeper whoops and in braking bumps, and just on rougher stuff or deep sand whoops offroad. I am wondering if all I have to do is adjust the rear shock a bit, to balance the bike out? All I did was set sag in the rear, but I did adjust the forks to have a higher pressure over standard (190/0/190). I am wondering about the Ride Engineering products that seem to fix these issues?

How does the Ride Engineering set up actually improve overall stability on a 15-17 RMZ 450? I have heard good things on the reviews, but wanted to check here too. I am willing to spend the $1000 on the new rear Linkage, the Triple Clamps, and well as the Showa Steering Damper, as long as they really make a difference. I have seen some people go as far to say that these products make the Suzuki a different bike, in terms of stability. That sounds good, but is it true? I don't mind giving up a little front end feel, for some higher speed stability either, I'm used to Yamahas.

If these Ride Engineering products don't do all that much, I would still have to spend a lot more to get a new bike, and don't wanna waste $ on RE stuff if it doesn't sound like a fix for me. I just can't live with the weight shifting front and rear on the Suzuki in rough stuff.



Thanks for any help

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10/20/2018 4:45 PM

I have the ride engineering link I'm gonna sell. I just got an 18 and it doesn't fit. Really helps settle the back of the bike down

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10/20/2018 5:02 PM

Rotaholic wrote:

I have the ride engineering link I'm gonna sell. I just got an 18 and it doesn't fit. Really helps settle the back of the bike down

You had the 15-17 RMZ, and had the RE link on it, but then upgraded to 2018 RMZ?

So the link does a lot?

Have you tried the steering damper or triple clamps?

Thanks man, I really don't wanna buy a new Yamaha right now, my 2015RM is brand new, and I like the forks better than I expected after reading the reviews.

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10/20/2018 5:09 PM

I would get the suspension setup first. I ran the clamps. But they were no better than stock imo.

The stock shock is a good baseline, maybe get it revalved and a spring to hold the bike up.

Remember roczen won the title with stock clamps.

For me, the 15 rmz was a lot easier for me to dial in at 240lbs vs my husky 450

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10/20/2018 5:09 PM
Edited Date/Time: 10/20/2018 5:11 PM

Yes, this 18 will be 6th RMZ450, stock camps are great. I really don't think a damper is needed, nip the steering stem lock nut up tight until the bars won't flop to one side on the stand. The rear shock really is an A kit shock and a simple revalve from race tech or similar works wonders, I did the spring conversion on the forks and ditched the air and it made the bike so much better. The fork definitely needs to be revalved, it is way off. Fork in the clamps 3-5mm, fork tube flush with the triple clamps for sand. 105-108mm sag. Run a longer chain so that the axle block is at the end of the swing arm, that will give you the stability you are looking for, will just sacrifice a tiny bit of sharp turn ability which really isnt an issue on a zook.

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10/20/2018 8:41 PM
Edited Date/Time: 10/20/2018 8:42 PM

Thanks guys. This is all very helpful for me. I like the bike a lot, besides the fore/aft imbalance I'm experiencing in rough stuff. I like how easy it is to hold a line around a turn and in ruts, and in the longer berms I have so much control, point and shoot right out of em'. I took this bike on a tight east coast woods ride, and was suprised that I wasn't as tired as I thought. It was just barely more work than my yz125. Sometimes I feel like I'm on a 250f on the suzuki, but then it has all the power I'll ever need, and then some. The 2016 YZ450f, at similar weight is a lot more work in the tight woods than the zook.

Bruce, you tried the clamps, but not the link? Which offset clamps, 20mm or 22mm?

Everything I've read researching, says the RE link makes the most "noticeable" difference out of all the parts. For $200, I think its worth a go on the linkage from Ride Engineering.

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10/20/2018 8:44 PM

You said you were a heavier rider.. did you put a stiffer spring in the shock? If its bottoming out its going to cause all kinds of issues. Bolt ons arent going to help that.

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10/20/2018 9:07 PM

I also have a showa a kit shock that I could do a deal on with the linkage.

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10/20/2018 9:36 PM

Freakazoid wrote:

Thanks guys. This is all very helpful for me. I like the bike a lot, besides the fore/aft imbalance I'm experiencing in rough stuff. I like how easy it is to hold a line around a turn and in ruts, and in the longer berms I have so much control, point and shoot right out of em'. I took this bike on a tight east coast woods ride, and was suprised that I wasn't as tired as I thought. It was just barely more work than my yz125. Sometimes I feel like I'm on a 250f on the suzuki, but then it has all the power I'll ever need, and then some. The 2016 YZ450f, at similar weight is a lot more work in the tight woods than the zook.

Bruce, you tried the clamps, but not the link? Which offset clamps, 20mm or 22mm?

Everything I've read researching, says the RE link makes the most "noticeable" difference out of all the parts. For $200, I think its worth a go on the linkage from Ride Engineering.

The only thing different about the clamps is they are slightly lighter.

Get a spring and a shock revalave and call it a day. The bike is that good.

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10/20/2018 9:37 PM

Maybe upgrade the front brake rotor first

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10/20/2018 10:16 PM
Edited Date/Time: 10/20/2018 10:17 PM

Bruce372 wrote:

Maybe upgrade the front brake rotor first

True. On topic with Ride Engineering, would their front brake caliper and steel lines make a difference? Or should I just stick with just one of oversized rotor kits that are a lil over $100?

What I'm taking away from this is to have the suspension worked on before buying all the Ride Engineering stuff. I still might try the link, if the spring change alone doesn't give me what I'm looking for. Then I'll spend another 5-10 hours at the track, getting a better feel for the bike so I can describe exactly what I want to the suspension tuners to do. I have never sent out my own suspension before. I always bought Yamahas new and didn't have to worry about it for my skillset. Or I bought used bikes that already had suspension work done (which usually felt incredible compared to any stock stuff, I admit)

I have seen people get away with tuning suspension front and rear for under $1000? is that realistic? I don't wanna dump too much more into this bike.

I still have to buy an exhaust system with a spark arrestor for offroad in my area.

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10/20/2018 10:31 PM

I really don't think the forks need too much work for me, I use Pat Fosters recommendations on Transworld (190/0/190) and they seem to hold up for my weight just fine. I'm definitely not blowing through the front fork when my bad fore/aft experience happens. I think it's more the rear end is putting me too forward, putting too much weight on the front end and making it uncomfortable.

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10/20/2018 11:29 PM

Bruce372 wrote:

Maybe upgrade the front brake rotor first

Freakazoid wrote:

True. On topic with Ride Engineering, would their front brake caliper and steel lines make a difference? Or should I just stick with just one of oversized rotor kits that are a lil over $100?

What I'm taking away from this is to have the suspension worked on before buying all the Ride Engineering stuff. I still might try the link, if the spring change alone doesn't give me what I'm looking for. Then I'll spend another 5-10 hours at the track, getting a better feel for the bike so I can describe exactly what I want to the suspension tuners to do. I have never sent out my own suspension before. I always bought Yamahas new and didn't have to worry about it for my skillset. Or I bought used bikes that already had suspension work done (which usually felt incredible compared to any stock stuff, I admit)

I have seen people get away with tuning suspension front and rear for under $1000? is that realistic? I don't wanna dump too much more into this bike.

I still have to buy an exhaust system with a spark arrestor for offroad in my area.

Dude, just get the shock revalved and a spring. You dont need the link. And if the tuner wants to swap the shock piston, find another tuner.

Get the galfer fixed rotor, its amazing and then a braided brake hose and that's it.

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