China wheel hubs (Aluminium)

Related:
Create New Tag

12/27/2017 4:46 AM

Hello
What are your thoughts on these wheel hubs from China?

Link: https://www.ebay.com/itm/CNC-Red-Billet-Front-Rear-Wheel-Hubs-fits-Honda-CR125R-CR250R-2000-2007/191669171248?hash=item2ca05f7430:g:bSkAAOSwMVdYHaP2&vxp=mtr

Are anyone here on the board running these? Anyone heard anything bad about the hubs?
" Precision CNC-machined from A6061-T6 forged aluminum"

|

12/27/2017 5:38 AM

Dont skimp on hubs. Buy hubs from a company that actually puts effort into them. You really want to risk your life with chinese hubs? They can say billet forged 6061 cnc all they want. Doesnt mean theyre good. 6061 is still soft as fuck and if its not thick enough in the right areas it will break.

Steer clear of these things.

|

2009 Kawasaki KX450F
2009 Kawasaki KX250F
2002 Suzuki GSXR 600

12/27/2017 6:36 AM

As with what was already said, how much is your life and safety worth to you if that front hub collapses or if the rear sheers off?

Buy them and give a ride report, but I wouldn’t trust those on my bike.

|

If you're not mixing gas, you're not haulin ass.

12/27/2017 6:36 AM

Go with Haan hubs, talon, or kite. Talon has some good price points and you will be safe. Where do we think the hibs on the Tusk wheelsets come from? Anyone know? Those have been solid

|

12/27/2017 7:56 AM

jan88 wrote:

Hello
What are your thoughts on these wheel hubs from China?

Link: https://www.ebay.com/itm/CNC-Red-Billet-Front-Rear-Wheel-Hubs-fits-Honda-CR125R-CR250R-2000-2007/191669171248?hash=item2ca05f7430:g:bSkAAOSwMVdYHaP2&vxp=mtr

Are anyone here on the board running these? Anyone heard anything bad about the hubs?
" Precision CNC-machined from A6061-T6 forged aluminum"

I asked that very question to a company here in the US that makes hubs and his reply was that the Chinese have zero ethics and one day you may get a "decent" hub but most times they're crushed up Hyundai cars and that he doesn't recommend any of the Chinese made hubs for that reason.

|

12/27/2017 9:33 AM

Just not worth the risk. One thing to consider is the knock on effect of it breaking, in addition to the potential of serious injury.

The rear hub failed on my friends Husky 250F, and the force of the lock-up transferred through the chain into the transmission causing way more damage. He was lucky it didn’t take out the cases, and I did the work for him for free, but the cost benefit of using a cheap wheel set didn’t quite work out for him.

Photo

|

12/27/2017 12:33 PM

They are shit my buddy bought them and ended up in the hospital with a broker arm because the hub just exploded off a medium size jump,he's an idiot for even trying them

|

12/27/2017 7:49 PM

Moto520 wrote:

Go with Haan hubs, talon, or kite. Talon has some good price points and you will be safe. Where do we think the hibs on the Tusk wheelsets come from? Anyone know? Those have been solid

Tusk hubs are made in Taiwan

|

12/28/2017 12:39 PM

Moto520 wrote:

Go with Haan hubs, talon, or kite. Talon has some good price points and you will be safe. Where do we think the hibs on the Tusk wheelsets come from? Anyone know? Those have been solid

As someone stated, Taiwan, and although I would consider Tusk a step above the Chinese hubs... All I'm saying is I know a vet guy who brought me a front Tusk wheel that had the spokes pull through the hub causing complete wheel collapse. His forks dug into the ground, and it sent him over the bars. This happened just riding down a hill...

|

@fiendz.cc

12/28/2017 12:48 PM

Acidreamer wrote:

Dont skimp on hubs. Buy hubs from a company that actually puts effort into them. You really want to risk your life with chinese hubs? They can say billet forged 6061 cnc all they want. Doesnt mean theyre good. 6061 is still soft as fuck and if its not thick enough in the right areas it will break.

Steer clear of these things.

This dudes on the money. It's worth noting, and I'm pretty sure this is what you're saying, that 6061 T6 aluminum from China is not the same as 6061 T6 aluminum from USA. The standards in their testing are different.

|

@fiendz.cc

12/28/2017 2:21 PM

Acidreamer wrote:

Dont skimp on hubs. Buy hubs from a company that actually puts effort into them. You really want to risk your life with chinese hubs? They can say billet forged 6061 cnc all they want. Doesnt mean theyre good. 6061 is still soft as fuck and if its not thick enough in the right areas it will break.

Steer clear of these things.

FiendzCC wrote:

This dudes on the money. It's worth noting, and I'm pretty sure this is what you're saying, that 6061 T6 aluminum from China is not the same as 6061 T6 aluminum from USA. The standards in their testing are different.

You would be amazed at how much 6061 T6 in america is actually 6061T6 from china.....

6061 T6 from china isnt bad material. You see it more than you think on products you think are made in usa. Sure, its made in usa, from materials bought in the usa, that the wholesaler imported from..... china.

The material has a certification with content breakdown and testing data just like american materials.

What you run in to with buying finished products from china is it being labeled one material, but actually being made from another.

If you want hubs from china, shoot an email and ask for the material certifications and heat numbers. If they dont have any, dont buy them. If they do, you will more than likely be fine.

|

12/28/2017 3:32 PM

Dtat720 wrote:

You would be amazed at how much 6061 T6 in america is actually 6061T6 from china.....

6061 T6 from china isnt bad material. You see it more than you think on products you think are made in usa. Sure, its made in usa, from materials bought in the usa, that the wholesaler imported from..... china.

The material has a certification with content breakdown and testing data just like american materials.

What you run in to with buying finished products from china is it being labeled one material, but actually being made from another.

If you want hubs from china, shoot an email and ask for the material certifications and heat numbers. If they dont have any, dont buy them. If they do, you will more than likely be fine.

That's cool, it's also illegal to do what you just described. The American aluminum we buy literally says "Made in USA" on it before we even put a tool to it, along with a certificate of origin. It's really as simple as doing your homework, and not buying from a sketchy supplier that would pull something like that.

|

@fiendz.cc

12/28/2017 5:08 PM
Edited Date/Time: 12/28/2017 5:13 PM

Acidreamer wrote:

Dont skimp on hubs. Buy hubs from a company that actually puts effort into them. You really want to risk your life with chinese hubs? They can say billet forged 6061 cnc all they want. Doesnt mean theyre good. 6061 is still soft as fuck and if its not thick enough in the right areas it will break.

Steer clear of these things.

FiendzCC wrote:

This dudes on the money. It's worth noting, and I'm pretty sure this is what you're saying, that 6061 T6 aluminum from China is not the same as 6061 T6 aluminum from USA. The standards in their testing are different.

Dtat720 wrote:

You would be amazed at how much 6061 T6 in america is actually 6061T6 from china.....

6061 T6 from china isnt bad material. You see it more than you think on products you think are made in usa. Sure, its made in usa, from materials bought in the usa, that the wholesaler imported from..... china.

The material has a certification with content breakdown and testing data just like american materials.

What you run in to with buying finished products from china is it being labeled one material, but actually being made from another.

If you want hubs from china, shoot an email and ask for the material certifications and heat numbers. If they dont have any, dont buy them. If they do, you will more than likely be fine.

Just so we are clear, although 6061 in china is not as good as it is here, 6061 is still very soft. I work with AMERICAN 6061 on a daily basis as a tool and die engineer. Its great stuff but it HAS to be thick enough in the right spots.

If you want good quality aluminum hubs, shoot for 7075 billet aluminum. Much better than 6061.

|

2009 Kawasaki KX450F
2009 Kawasaki KX250F
2002 Suzuki GSXR 600

12/28/2017 8:00 PM

Acidreamer wrote:

Just so we are clear, although 6061 in china is not as good as it is here, 6061 is still very soft. I work with AMERICAN 6061 on a daily basis as a tool and die engineer. Its great stuff but it HAS to be thick enough in the right spots.

If you want good quality aluminum hubs, shoot for 7075 billet aluminum. Much better than 6061.

Most guys cringe at paying more than grand for a decent set of wheels though, using 7075 on the hubs would drive that price tag even higher. Don't get me wrong, I understand your point about it technically being stronger (we use 7075 on the spacers to prevent grooving because of this), but I've been selling wheels a long time and I can count on one hand the amount of customers that would be willing to drop more money into their wheels for even stronger hubs when a properly designed and quality 6061 hub doesn't break. Now, if you know where these customers exist, please send them my way and I'll make it happen haha

|

@fiendz.cc

12/29/2017 6:43 AM

FiendzCC wrote:

This dudes on the money. It's worth noting, and I'm pretty sure this is what you're saying, that 6061 T6 aluminum from China is not the same as 6061 T6 aluminum from USA. The standards in their testing are different.

Dtat720 wrote:

You would be amazed at how much 6061 T6 in america is actually 6061T6 from china.....

6061 T6 from china isnt bad material. You see it more than you think on products you think are made in usa. Sure, its made in usa, from materials bought in the usa, that the wholesaler imported from..... china.

The material has a certification with content breakdown and testing data just like american materials.

What you run in to with buying finished products from china is it being labeled one material, but actually being made from another.

If you want hubs from china, shoot an email and ask for the material certifications and heat numbers. If they dont have any, dont buy them. If they do, you will more than likely be fine.

Acidreamer wrote:

Just so we are clear, although 6061 in china is not as good as it is here, 6061 is still very soft. I work with AMERICAN 6061 on a daily basis as a tool and die engineer. Its great stuff but it HAS to be thick enough in the right spots.

If you want good quality aluminum hubs, shoot for 7075 billet aluminum. Much better than 6061.

I own a cnc shop. Go through probably 10-15k pounds of 6061 a week. I use accu rod or sapa, had to stop using easton due to its dismal inconsistencies.

My point about made in usa....

Products can be “made in usa” and still be made FROM chinese materials. Distributors across the country sell chinese materials for manufacturers everyday. We have to specify brand every time we order stainless or aluminum to ensure we are getting american made materials.

There is nothing “illegal” about claiming made in thr usa and using foreign materials. It is still made in thr usa.

|

12/29/2017 7:21 AM

Get what ya pay for, buy junk get junk. Risking injury to save $500-600. Lol.

|

12/29/2017 11:45 AM

Dtat720 wrote:

You would be amazed at how much 6061 T6 in america is actually 6061T6 from china.....

6061 T6 from china isnt bad material. You see it more than you think on products you think are made in usa. Sure, its made in usa, from materials bought in the usa, that the wholesaler imported from..... china.

The material has a certification with content breakdown and testing data just like american materials.

What you run in to with buying finished products from china is it being labeled one material, but actually being made from another.

If you want hubs from china, shoot an email and ask for the material certifications and heat numbers. If they dont have any, dont buy them. If they do, you will more than likely be fine.

Acidreamer wrote:

Just so we are clear, although 6061 in china is not as good as it is here, 6061 is still very soft. I work with AMERICAN 6061 on a daily basis as a tool and die engineer. Its great stuff but it HAS to be thick enough in the right spots.

If you want good quality aluminum hubs, shoot for 7075 billet aluminum. Much better than 6061.

Dtat720 wrote:

I own a cnc shop. Go through probably 10-15k pounds of 6061 a week. I use accu rod or sapa, had to stop using easton due to its dismal inconsistencies.

My point about made in usa....

Products can be “made in usa” and still be made FROM chinese materials. Distributors across the country sell chinese materials for manufacturers everyday. We have to specify brand every time we order stainless or aluminum to ensure we are getting american made materials.

There is nothing “illegal” about claiming made in thr usa and using foreign materials. It is still made in thr usa.

Would have to ask a company that actually makes the raw material for us to buy.. but im fairly confident that even if we import raw materials and make the alloy here, the material would still have to conform to various strength and hardness standards.

Regardless tho, fuck those hubs

|

2009 Kawasaki KX450F
2009 Kawasaki KX250F
2002 Suzuki GSXR 600

12/29/2017 1:34 PM

For the parts of interest here (machined motocross components), if they carry the claim of "Made in the USA", then they must be made from US made material (scroll down to "Are raw materials included in the evaluation of..."):

Complying with the Made in USA Standard

Regarding the origin of the 6061 material (and associated temper), it really shouldn't matter where the material comes from so long as it is actually tested to the appropriate standard and passes. So if you're getting material from a reputable supplier, then it's largely irrelevant. The question really is how reputable is your supplier? Most major US suppliers are reputable. Beyond that, though, how reputable is the manufacturer? Are they really making the components from what they say they are made from?

And regarding the differences between 6061-T6/6511 (the most popular aluminum for machined components) and 7075, there are many things to consider. First, most people don't realize that 7075-T6 has issues with stress corrosion cracking, which hardly makes it ideal for something under constant stress like a hub. The over-aged T73 condition doesn't have stress corrosion cracking issues, but isn't as strong as the T6 condition. However, it is stronger than 6061-T6 by about 37% and harder by about 30%, though hardness isn't really relevant here.

So, relevant to hub design, 7075-T73 is the best choice from a material standpoint alone. But you have to think of material cost and material availability. These two factors alone usually make 6061-T6 the right choice, but beyond that, if the part is designed with 6061 in mind, then 6061 will work just fine at a lower price point and high material availability, all with minimal difference in weight for the same strength as 7075.

|

Billy Wight
Luxon MX
@LuxonMX
https://luxonmx.com
Motocross Components Engineered for Performance