Brakes

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3/23/2018 8:54 PM

So I have a 2016 kx450f and just about everybody who has ridden a kawasaki knows how bad the brakes. To fix this I added a ride engineering front caliper, stainless steel line, and a brembo master cylinder. I thought this would fix the problem however, my front brake still feels like really spongy. I thought having bigger caliper pistons and master cylinder piston would create a stiffer feel but so far it has created the exact opposite. I have bleed them at least 20 times and have tried just about every tool and trick possible. My last solution would be to use a automatic bleeder like a snap on or something similar. Has anybody ever had success with an automatic bleeder?

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3/23/2018 9:25 PM

Yes have had success with the pumps to bleed brakes.

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3/23/2018 9:26 PM

I use this one, works well. I won’t bleed brakes or clutch without it. Keep an eye on the master fill level it can get drained out fast.
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3/23/2018 11:14 PM

What pads are you using? I've found that to make a big difference.

I was having similar issues with my '15 KX450f. My setup now works great.

Stock MC + Caliper
Galfer Braided line
Galfer DF200FLS 270mm Rotor
EBC MXS pads

Also, make sure you bleed the brakes properly. I use one of those motion pro brake bleeders. Cheap tool that works great.

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3/24/2018 5:09 AM

Not kxf but on my rmz250 the brake where shit , I flushed out all the factory fluid using the gravity feed method, ,replaced it with Lucas oil , new core front brake line and a motostuff oversized rotor and new pads and the thing is amazing

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3/24/2018 6:27 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/24/2018 6:36 AM

Here's a few things you can try KTM with the brembos always feel mushy they actually sell you a little device to hold the brake lever in when the bike is not in use, you can do it just by wrapping tape around pull the lever back as far as it will go to the grip and tape it in that position ,leave it sit overnight lean the bike to the left same with the handlebars turn to the left so so master is at its highest point

Another thing to check pump up your master cylinder like you would normally to bleed instead of cracking the bolt on the bottom crack open the banjo bolt up top, the master cylinder sometimes air gets trapped in this area.

The caliper is another place air will get trapped sometimes you can get it out by pumping piston out then forcing all the way back in, do this a few times.

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3/24/2018 2:42 PM

I use a hand vac on mine also. Works great. Another great way to bleed, especially if refilling after replacing a line, is take the caliper off the bike and tie it to the ceiling or a shelf so the line is 100% uphill from the m/c with the bleed valve as close tot he top as possible. Place a piece of plywood or something between the pistons (pads removed so you don't get fluid all over them). Then fill the reservoir and just keep pumping the fluid up to the top with the lever. All the air will naturally rise and be pumped out the top at the bleed valve.

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Powerband in every gear !

3/25/2018 9:38 PM

FGR01 wrote:

I use a hand vac on mine also. Works great. Another great way to bleed, especially if refilling after replacing a line, is take the caliper off the bike and tie it to the ceiling or a shelf so the line is 100% uphill from the m/c with the bleed valve as close tot he top as possible. Place a piece of plywood or something between the pistons (pads removed so you don't get fluid all over them). Then fill the reservoir and just keep pumping the fluid up to the top with the lever. All the air will naturally rise and be pumped out the top at the bleed valve.

I've considered that method. Makes sense doesn't it

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3/26/2018 4:46 AM

You can also reverse bleed them, fill a syringe with brake fluid and push up from the bleed screw as you go. Time consuming but really effective. I’ve got one of those snap on pneumatic bleeders, works great. I know the other mechanic I work with has one that he bought on amazon for about 20 bucks that does the same exact job though.

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RPM Performance
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3/26/2018 8:08 AM

First off thank you for all the responses. I extremely appreciate it. Ok so I've tried a couple of things and so far I haven't found a solution. I also switched between the stock master cylinder and the ktm master cylinder. I also custom made a cap for the mater cylinder where you can pump the fluid through a nipple. My caliper pistons dont move at all. By any chance is there a way to check to see if the pistons are frozen? Thanks! JT

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3/26/2018 10:11 AM

murph783 wrote:

You can also reverse bleed them, fill a syringe with brake fluid and push up from the bleed screw as you go. Time consuming but really effective. I’ve got one of those snap on pneumatic bleeders, works great. I know the other mechanic I work with has one that he bought on amazon for about 20 bucks that does the same exact job though.

How long does it usually take you?

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3/26/2018 3:44 PM

murph783 wrote:

You can also reverse bleed them, fill a syringe with brake fluid and push up from the bleed screw as you go. Time consuming but really effective. I’ve got one of those snap on pneumatic bleeders, works great. I know the other mechanic I work with has one that he bought on amazon for about 20 bucks that does the same exact job though.

jaketiernan298 wrote:

How long does it usually take you?

Couple minutes, but I have a big syringe that can hold quite a bit of fluid. And you’ve got to have just the right adapter to get it into the bleeder without forcing air in too. I made mine, but I believe there’s a similar tool sold for bleeding Magura hydraulic clutches

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RPM Performance
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783

3/27/2018 3:27 PM

I have the Ride Eng caliper also. My experience is that it is not as firm (stiff) feeling as the stock caliper/master. Where the lever with stock caliper/master hit a wall, so to speak, becoming very firm (but with little power), the RE caliper/stock master never hits this wall. It's instead very progressive and very powerful. To me the feel is identical to the KTM brake. RE designed the caliper for an 11 mm master. You didn't say which model Brembo master you have, but for me, going even 1 mm smaller on the master cause the feel to change from progressive to mushy.
I'm not saying that you don't have a problem, just that the lever may never feel as stiff as the stock set up.

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3/30/2018 10:36 PM

Cadpro18 wrote:

I have the Ride Eng caliper also. My experience is that it is not as firm (stiff) feeling as the stock caliper/master. Where the lever with stock caliper/master hit a wall, so to speak, becoming very firm (but with little power), the RE caliper/stock master never hits this wall. It's instead very progressive and very powerful. To me the feel is identical to the KTM brake. RE designed the caliper for an 11 mm master. You didn't say which model Brembo master you have, but for me, going even 1 mm smaller on the master cause the feel to change from progressive to mushy.
I'm not saying that you don't have a problem, just that the lever may never feel as stiff as the stock set up.

I actually finally got it to work. Realized that the banjo bolt that was given to me when I bought the stainless steeline was too short for the caliper so I put the stock one back in and now I'm doing stoppies all day long ?Photo

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