Adding stability to bike

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3/16/2021 1:38 PM

I have a bike setup question that I’ve always wondered. I know lowering the forks in the clamps creates more stability (at the expense of handling). Also, correct me if I’m wrong but this also can be achieved by lowering the rear end (lowering link). Which one creates better stability and why is one route pursued over the other?

Coming off an RM 250, now on a ktm 250sx....it feels way more stable than the RM but seems a little twitchy to me at low speed tight turning. The stock fork height in the clamps exposes almost an inch of fork tube above the top clamp. Seems way too much imo. I plan on lowering them to see if that helps, but this made me think of that question.

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#TeamSway
SwayMX.com

3/16/2021 3:18 PM

I always think of the front end in terms of steering and stability. I've never ridden a bike with a lowering link, so I cannot speak to that with any authority.
Raising your front end by lowering the fork tubes in the clamps will make the bike more slack. It will resist turn-in and come to center more easily. Your perception will be of a slower-turning but more stable machine down the straights. You will have to concentrate more to make it stick in the corners.
Doing the opposite will make the bike turn faster and track more accurately in the corners, but make it more nervous at speed.
BTW, I wouldn't take out that entire inch of exposed fork; that may be too radical a change. Go in small increments - maybe 5mm at a time, max.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

3/16/2021 3:34 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/16/2021 3:34 PM

1 word:
Steering stabilizer

Have had one on every bike since my 1996 CR250 (my faves are the tried-and-true Scotts + old-school GPR V1.0).

Worth every penny and easily transferred.

Allows me to run whatever geometry I prefer, too, and I am guaranteed stability.

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3/16/2021 4:07 PM

Teej317 wrote:

I have a bike setup question that I’ve always wondered. I know lowering the forks in the clamps creates more stability (at the ...more

What year is your bike? I’ve never seen a ktm with the forks more the 10mm or so above the clamps

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3/16/2021 4:19 PM

Teej317 wrote:

I have a bike setup question that I’ve always wondered. I know lowering the forks in the clamps creates more stability (at the ...more

soggy wrote:

What year is your bike? I’ve never seen a ktm with the forks more the 10mm or so above the clamps

Second or third line (visible above the clamp) they should be at, at hard packed.

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3/16/2021 5:01 PM

Teej317 wrote:

I have a bike setup question that I’ve always wondered. I know lowering the forks in the clamps creates more stability (at the ...more

soggy wrote:

What year is your bike? I’ve never seen a ktm with the forks more the 10mm or so above the clamps

aees wrote:

Second or third line (visible above the clamp) they should be at, at hard packed.

Yea which is somewhere between 10-15mm right? 1 inch sounds drastic and will cause knifing in corners I think

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3/17/2021 8:48 AM

soggy wrote:

What year is your bike? I’ve never seen a ktm with the forks more the 10mm or so above the clamps

aees wrote:

Second or third line (visible above the clamp) they should be at, at hard packed.

soggy wrote:

Yea which is somewhere between 10-15mm right? 1 inch sounds drastic and will cause knifing in corners I think

You are correct, an inch is definitely exaggerated. I posted this away from my bike....looks to be third line exposed. Like I said, coming off an RM 250 I had those forks lowered to the bottom of the caps to gain more stability and I've been conditioned to think this should be normal on all bikes lol.

I will lower 5mm and see what that does, thanks guys.

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#TeamSway
SwayMX.com

3/17/2021 8:53 AM

I usually ran my KTM at 2nd line on the forks (so sounds like lower in the clamps than you are).

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