73 TS185K Suzuki Electrical Info

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6/14/2018 3:50 AM

I am restoring an old TS185 electrical system and am stymied with regard to a couple components that do not appear on any wiring diagrams or electrical charts. The closest diagram I can find is for a 1975 model and it does not depict two items that are mounter below the battery box. One is a very large resistor which I think is what they call a Magneto resistor. The value of it and exact purpose is not discussed anywhere. Next to that is what looks like an induction coil that may serve to impede voltage spikes in the AC line. If anyone has a faithful diagram or can elaborate on these parts, I would certainly appreciate the help. PS The system does have a single diode rectifier in the charging line to the battery which I will prolly replace with a full wave rectifier from a later model bike.

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6/14/2018 3:06 PM

victs185 wrote:

I am restoring an old TS185 electrical system and am stymied with regard to a couple components that do not appear on any wiring diagrams or electrical charts. The closest diagram I can find is for a 1975 model and it does not depict two items that are mounter below the battery box. One is a very large resistor which I think is what they call a Magneto resistor. The value of it and exact purpose is not discussed anywhere. Next to that is what looks like an induction coil that may serve to impede voltage spikes in the AC line. If anyone has a faithful diagram or can elaborate on these parts, I would certainly appreciate the help. PS The system does have a single diode rectifier in the charging line to the battery which I will prolly replace with a full wave rectifier from a later model bike.

If you go with a full wave rectifier, you'll have too much voltage drop due to the forward resistance of the diodes. If memory serves, those bikes had 6 volt electrics...very weak to begin with. There is no induction coil on those bikes. if it's a round aluminum can, it's the turn signal relay. The magneto resistor allowed excess current to bleed off from the magneto when the lights were off, since the machine had no voltage regulator.

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Many thanks to everyone helping me out this GNCC season: SRT Offroad, Acerbis, FCR Suspension, O'Neal Racing, Evans Waterless Coolants, Rekluse, Twin Air, Braking Brakes, Carbsport

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6/15/2018 4:12 AM

Thanks for weighing in, harescrambled. The electrical system on this '73 is very primitive. It is 6 volts. The daunting part of this mission is no faithful wiring diagram anywhere. I'm using a '75 diagram and it is as close as I can find.
The big , honking resistor is mounted under the battery box and is in series with the daytime charging coil voltage tap
that feeds the rectifier diode. It is a current limiting resistor, prolly as to not overcharge the battery in day mode. When lights are selected ( night mode), the tailight is switched into the circuit and presents addition demand on the DC battery.
In this mode the resistor is switched out of the circuit and the full output of the charging coil is presented to the diode rectifier. The resistor is entirely bypassed at this point and is idle. That baffling, other component (also mounted in the same bracket adjacent to the resistor , has got to be some kind of AC limiting device. It is heavy wire wound on a laminated steel core and apparently insulated from that core. It is definitely factory equipment but does not show on any literature. The flasher relay is under the gas tank, I believe. I am going to trace the yellow wires that are connected to that mystery coil and see where they go. I have a feeling they will be in series with lighting, AC, coil output. I'll post results later. A full wave rectifier would present a higher average voltage into the DC circuit and maybe shorten light bulb life. But later model year bikes switched to full-wave diode rectifiers and still ran 6 volt systems and deleted the inline resistor. But they also made other circuit changes as well. I will keep prospecting the wiring bundles and search for the electrical Truth !! All are welcome to comment since documentation is very limited on this model. Thanks guys

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6/18/2018 5:29 PM

Pictures?
I have access to a 1973 parts EPC that demonstrates several pages of drawings. There is, in fact, a Magneto Resistor assembly, but it doesn't indicate its location on the bike. There's also a voltage regulator assembly. Both assemblies look like they have a bracket, so they would be hanging visibly somewhere.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

6/19/2018 4:57 AM

Can I get a copy of this EPC and the drawings? I have pictures of these parts in their mounting brackets.

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6/19/2018 10:34 AM

I'll see what I can upload... stay tuned.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

6/19/2018 4:05 PM

Here are the pages out of the EPC. Let me know which item you have a question about and I can provide you with a part number and description. (The page title is at the top of each photo.)

Photo

Photo

Photo

Photo

Photo

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Braaapin' aint easy.

6/19/2018 4:37 PM

what is items 10 and 11 in fig 31 ?
is item 7 in fig 30 being called a regulator ?

And how can I upload pics to this thread?

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6/19/2018 4:38 PM

Photo
Photo
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6/19/2018 4:41 PM

The above photos show the battery box and the rectifier , green ceramic resistor and an inductive coil wound around a core and wrapped in tattered gauze.

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6/19/2018 4:48 PM

victs185 wrote:

what is items 10 and 11 in fig 31 ?
is item 7 in fig 30 being called a regulator ?

And how can I upload pics to this thread?

#10 and #11 in Fig. 31 are:
36740-15010 CASE ASSY, FUSE
09481-15001 .FUSE

Item #7 in Fig. 30:
32500-25600 REGULATOR ASSY, VOLTAGE

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Braaapin' aint easy.

6/19/2018 4:57 PM

Thanks, Falcon......did you see my pics?

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6/20/2018 3:50 AM

I would like to find an actual wiring diagram for this model....not easy so far !!

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6/20/2018 2:58 PM

Yes, I saw your pictures. I'm not really good at diagnosing what I see, though! laughing

Sorry, there's no wiring diagram I can find.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

6/21/2018 3:13 AM

It is a goofy system and a wiring diagram is non existent. That it works is truly astounding. Thanks for all your input, Falcon.

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