2017 Husky 350 aer 48 set up..

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11/14/2017 2:30 AM

Hi, I have a 17 FC350 which I'm losing the front end on cornering. It seems to want to tuck and I can't steer it in slippy conditions. I've got everything set to manufacturers standard in terms of clickers and air pressure. I'm basically just starting out with the bike. My forks are set to the lowest line in the triple clamps. My race sag on the rear is at 100mm but being 17st/238 pounds I've had a 54nm rear spring fitted.
Am I better off adding more air pressure and less compression? Raising the fork legs a little? The forks do not feel soft enough in the standard setting when I compare them to my Showa spring forks on my RMZ.

I may think about a revalve in the new year but for the price it will have to wait until after Christmas it is not an option now. Having said that I have never ever had a bike revalved but I've always managed to get the suspension working brilliantly for myself.

I'm not losing any traction at the rear wheel with the stiffer spring either.

Thanks for any help.

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11/14/2017 11:51 AM

Sounds to me like you have the bike set up a bit too much front end biased with low sag numbers and also forks high up in the triples. I would start going to atleast 103-108 sag and put the forks at the 2nd line.

What pressure are you running?

Also the aer48 fork will not feel as soft as an springfork, it may feel very stiff with recommended pressures but when riding it's still plush.

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11/14/2017 12:19 PM

Jensenyo wrote:

Sounds to me like you have the bike set up a bit too much front end biased with low sag numbers and also forks high up in the triples. I would start going to atleast 103-108 sag and put the forks at the 2nd line.

What pressure are you running?

Also the aer48 fork will not feel as soft as an springfork, it may feel very stiff with recommended pressures but when riding it's still plush.

Yes it does feel very stiff already, I thought if I add more air but lower the compression slightly it may feel nicer. Obviously I'll see how she rides.

I'm running the recommended 154psi. I suppose I should up that psi because that is the psi recommend to work with the stock rear spring. So essentially I'm running a stiffer rear spring with the same pressure in the forks it's gonna sag front heavy. If I had sprung forks obviously I'd have changed the fork springs to match the stiffer rear spring. I need to have a play about this weekend. Apparently the forks are highly tuneable

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11/14/2017 10:31 PM

Jensenyo wrote:

Sounds to me like you have the bike set up a bit too much front end biased with low sag numbers and also forks high up in the triples. I would start going to atleast 103-108 sag and put the forks at the 2nd line.

What pressure are you running?

Also the aer48 fork will not feel as soft as an springfork, it may feel very stiff with recommended pressures but when riding it's still plush.

rc10andy wrote:

Yes it does feel very stiff already, I thought if I add more air but lower the compression slightly it may feel nicer. Obviously I'll see how she rides.

I'm running the recommended 154psi. I suppose I should up that psi because that is the psi recommend to work with the stock rear spring. So essentially I'm running a stiffer rear spring with the same pressure in the forks it's gonna sag front heavy. If I had sprung forks obviously I'd have changed the fork springs to match the stiffer rear spring. I need to have a play about this weekend. Apparently the forks are highly tuneable

I know 154psi is recommended but that has not worked at all for me, try 145-140psi. I have gone even lower for flat track and front end feel is great.

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11/15/2017 4:22 AM

I have tried lots of different setups on my 17 TC250 and I am happy with where I’m at now. I would suggest not changing anything except setting your rider sag at 105. From there I’m betting you will be close to just fine tuning.

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11/15/2017 11:16 AM

I would lower the air pressure to 145, and run 15 out on both compression and rebound. I run my AER's on the 3rd line, but try both the 2nd and the 3rd and see which you prefer. Out back, 105 mm for the sag is the sweet spot. Your shock spring is correct for your weight. Try running the high-speed compression at 1-3/4 turns out, low-speed at 15 out, and rebound at 10 out.

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11/15/2017 11:44 AM

There is no way you should run less than 154psi at your weight and with that rear spring. I ran 153psi with 48 rear spring...

Set sag to 106mm, and start at 160psi. and go lower from there.

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11/15/2017 1:19 PM

MotoMatt_928 wrote:

I would lower the air pressure to 145, and run 15 out on both compression and rebound. I run my AER's on the 3rd line, but try both the 2nd and the 3rd and see which you prefer. Out back, 105 mm for the sag is the sweet spot. Your shock spring is correct for your weight. Try running the high-speed compression at 1-3/4 turns out, low-speed at 15 out, and rebound at 10 out.

I run all the same except for rebound which I go around 8-9 out on front and rear depending on the track...I have a bit of a flat tracking influence though....1 out on rear for flat tracking.

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11/16/2017 3:03 PM

Throw a zip tie on your fork leg and set your psi to 145. After shredding some laps/miles, see if the zip tie is at the bottom of the fork. If it isn't, you're not using full travel of the fork. wink

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11/17/2017 1:47 AM

Thanks for the replies guys! At the track Sunday and I'm going somewhere that gets really rough so I'll be able to work out whats best

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11/17/2017 2:50 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/17/2017 2:52 AM

MotoMatt_928 wrote:

Throw a zip tie on your fork leg and set your psi to 145. After shredding some laps/miles, see if the zip tie is at the bottom of the fork. If it isn't, you're not using full travel of the fork. wink

This is not always reliable. It assumes you have somewhat of resonable balance. If you jump really big jumps with slap down landings it will throw you off.

145psi is just to low, and to low air pressure will push the fork down in its stroke making it harsh + it will not bottom or be in the right part of the stroke for 90% of the track (the non-jumping sections).

The lower the fork starts in the stroke, the harder it gets for it to bottom since there is less stroke left to build momentum.

This can be demonstrated by taking a forkleg from the bike, push it 4inches down in the stroke, stay there for a sec or two and from there try to push it as far down you can in one move.

Then do the same with the fork starting fully extended.

You will be able to push the fork further down, the higher in stroke you start (with some limitations of course).

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11/17/2017 4:43 AM

SER Forks bottom out with about 15mm of slider left btw. Yes fiddle with the air, 12-15 out on both comp and reg. Also if you're using the MX3S front tire, run it at 14 psi.

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