2016+ KTM shock spring length

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8/22/2017 2:45 PM

To make a long story short, I've had more trouble than could be expected trying to get in a stiffer shock spring for a 2016 KTM.

The stock shock spring is 247mm in length and I'd assume that any replacement would be around that same length. So far I've ordered in two aftermarket springs, however, and both have been substantially longer. (One 1/2" longer, the other 3/4" longer).

So now I was browsing around the web figuring I'll just order an OEM / WP replacement (that I know to be 247mm) when I see that Motosport and Rocky Mountain both show the springs have been superseded by new part numbers with all of them showing 260mm length instead of 247. From my understanding 260mm is the length of the springs for the prior generation bikes that had a longer shock.

Anyone know whats going with these things and if there's any reason I shouldn't just order one of the WP 247mm length springs that are listed in the owners manual?

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8/22/2017 2:55 PM

The 2016 is 247 or 250 in some cases and 62mm inside diameter. The older springs are 260 and 63mm inside. What size do you need as I have some in stock.

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8/22/2017 8:10 PM

I have different springs for my shock and they are different lengths. As long as you can hit your sag there should be any performance difference.

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8/23/2017 6:53 AM

260 seems just to add a bit to much length, plus you will have trouble getting the spring on the bike without removing swingarm.

247 is 45 and 48 springs, think my 50nm was 255 and that was just about i could get it through without removing swingarm.

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1/7/2018 10:59 PM

karlz wrote:

The 2016 is 247 or 250 in some cases and 62mm inside diameter. The older springs are 260 and 63mm inside. What size do you need as I have some in stock.

There's a 42-260 in my FC 350.

Seems they have gone back to the taller springs?

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1/7/2018 11:00 PM

CarlinoJoeVideo wrote:

I have different springs for my shock and they are different lengths. As long as you can hit your sag there should be any performance difference.

Does a shorter spring lower the ride height?

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1/8/2018 2:17 AM

Spring length does not affect ride height, geometric or any other suspension parameter. It is just a longer spring, adding some weight.

Stock spring is 247mm, but 255 and 260mm is also common from 3rd part and ok to use. You can still use the model where you drop the shock down and pull it out between swingarm and subframe on right side of bike with a 260mm spring but it just gets slightly more delicate.

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1/8/2018 7:12 AM

they have gone back to a 260mm

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1/8/2018 10:20 AM

You don't need to remove the shock to change the spring. Loosen the spring preload, undo both linkage bolts, remove the spring retaining clip and then drop the shock out the bottom

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1/8/2018 11:11 AM

kylant wrote:

they have gone back to a 260mm

Correct. Which is why I am confused. Because the microfiche doesnt list any of the 260's as a replacement part. Weird.

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1/8/2018 11:20 AM

kylant wrote:

they have gone back to a 260mm

Jabroni wrote:

Correct. Which is why I am confused. Because the microfiche doesnt list any of the 260's as a replacement part. Weird.

they do:
SPRING 260 45 N/MM |

that from RMATV parts fiche for 2017 250

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1/8/2018 11:20 AM

aees wrote:

Spring length does not affect ride height, geometric or any other suspension parameter. It is just a longer spring, adding some weight.

Stock spring is 247mm, but 255 and 260mm is also common from 3rd part and ok to use. You can still use the model where you drop the shock down and pull it out between swingarm and subframe on right side of bike with a 260mm spring but it just gets slightly more delicate.

So if I switched between a 247 and 260 (same spring rate), leaving everything else the same, it wouldnt change the sag numbers?

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1/8/2018 11:46 AM

aees wrote:

Spring length does not affect ride height, geometric or any other suspension parameter. It is just a longer spring, adding some weight.

Stock spring is 247mm, but 255 and 260mm is also common from 3rd part and ok to use. You can still use the model where you drop the shock down and pull it out between swingarm and subframe on right side of bike with a 260mm spring but it just gets slightly more delicate.

Jabroni wrote:

So if I switched between a 247 and 260 (same spring rate), leaving everything else the same, it wouldnt change the sag numbers?

In theory, yes.

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1/8/2018 11:54 AM

aees wrote:

Spring length does not affect ride height, geometric or any other suspension parameter. It is just a longer spring, adding some weight.

Stock spring is 247mm, but 255 and 260mm is also common from 3rd part and ok to use. You can still use the model where you drop the shock down and pull it out between swingarm and subframe on right side of bike with a 260mm spring but it just gets slightly more delicate.

Jabroni wrote:

So if I switched between a 247 and 260 (same spring rate), leaving everything else the same, it wouldnt change the sag numbers?

Correct. With same amount of preload you should get same sag. However this assumes both Springs are identical in terms of stiffness, and they will not be. It will differ a few percentage in stiffness in various lengths of the strokes since it is impossible to produce exact copies of Springs due to manufacturing process. Probably you will not notice it.

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