17 crf450 fork springs

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1/9/2018 1:29 PM
Edited Date/Time: 1/9/2018 3:52 PM

I'm going to swap the springs myself, so I'm wondering where I should purchase the springs from. I have decent local pro speed, at 175 lbs, and these spring are way too soft for me. Constantly bottoming out. I have a friend willing to swap his stiffer 18 rear shock spring with me, so I was also wondering if I should just purchase stock 18 fork springs from motorsport or go to an aftermarket dealer. Also, if I'm bottoming these out so bad, should I go up two spring rates or would just the one jump be good enough?

Thanks!

Edit* Is there a difference in spring quality from and aftermarket dealer and stock springs?

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1/9/2018 1:38 PM

Racetech springs are great. Costs $250 for all 3. They have a calculator on their site where you enter your weight and ability and it will tell you what springs you need. They send preload washers with their fork springs for you to play around with too. You want the right spprings for your weight so your bike is set right. You dont want an ass high bike or front high bike.

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2009 Kawasaki KX450F
2009 Kawasaki KX250F
2002 Suzuki GSXR 600

1/9/2018 3:15 PM

Springs do not keep you from bottoming out.

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1/9/2018 3:51 PM

Dcope17 wrote:

Springs do not keep you from bottoming out.

What does then?

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1/9/2018 4:30 PM
Edited Date/Time: 1/9/2018 4:57 PM

The shocks, not the springs. Meaning the shock oil weight and the valves in the forks/shock keep you from bottoming out.
Buy the strongest spring made for your bike, install them but leave the oil out and you not only will bottom out on the landings, but the takeoff as well. Really light springs and thick oil, as long as the shock/fork fully extends while airborne, you'll never bottom out even flatlanding. This is just an example but shows the function of the components.

I'm not saying you don't need springs. Spring rate and length are a specific part of suspension and how it handles. Don't know if there are different lengths or not for MX bikes.

The right spring rates keep the suspension where you want it during braking and accel. Fork springs too light and you could bottom out under hard braking or simply be way too close to the bottom of the travel. Dampening has no affect here.

Get springs for your weight, change dampening to keep from bottoming but too stiff dampening and you lose cornering grip.

Sorry didn't mean to take it out that far... but you get my point.

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1/9/2018 5:04 PM

KISS method.

1. Spring the bike for your weight
2. Adjust clickers. If compression is maxed and your bottoming, go to step 3.
3. Add oil or use thicker oil.
4. Revalve
5. Even stiffer springs
6. Step 2-5.

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2009 Kawasaki KX450F
2009 Kawasaki KX250F
2002 Suzuki GSXR 600

1/9/2018 6:24 PM

Right on thanks everyone!

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1/10/2018 9:46 AM

I have the stock 18 springs I will sell you ...

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1/10/2018 10:47 AM

Springs absolutely help with bottoming control, and oil volume. Preload is another component to measure. Optimize your damping for your speed in the first 6in of travel, and your bottoming control will be helped out immensely.

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Livin' the dream, two wheels at a time!

1/12/2018 7:30 AM

Spring do give some bottoming control...
Landing a jump ( springs 1%, dampening 99% )
Braking into turns with braking bumps ( springs 30%, dampening 70% )

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