07' YZ250F Gearing Help..

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5/29/2018 12:08 PM

Learning to track ride and wondering if a gearing change wouldn't help? Admittedly, I'm a slower rider at this point, but seem to find myself in too high of gear pulling out of corners. Although I'm clutching her, she wants to bog a lot of the time. She does have an FMF Megabomb header and exhaust. On the contrary, a gear lower can be overly powerful, blowing out the rear end.

Any help/suggestions would be greatly appreciated..

Raz

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6/4/2018 12:42 PM

Any help here guys?

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6/4/2018 12:53 PM

Best bet is to get used to the power. Instead of going in the corner in 3rd, go in 2nd and slowly ease into the power band. Increase your speed each time. No matter what gearing or bike youre on, theres gonna be a point where you need to just lay into it and go. Try to find a flat track to practice on so its not overwhelming.

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6/5/2018 8:39 AM

The problem, although I've lowered the chassis on the forks as low as possible, 14mm versus the OEM 5mm (which has helped a great deal with front end traction, another problem I'm dealing with) coming out of the corner in second can be overly powerful, fish tailing the rear end. If I am able to sustain it, I find myself needing a quick shift to third (if I have the time) the another down to 2nd, etc, etc. Just out of sync, you know? 2nd just feels loaded with torque then instant power..

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6/5/2018 9:19 AM

Then ride 3rd and slip the clutch. Idk what else to tell you. Much ty.

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6/5/2018 9:59 AM

That's exactly what I've been doing, but still seem to feel out of gear, wondered if a rear sprocket change could be of some help..?

Thanks bud, appreciate it

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6/5/2018 10:57 AM

You can lower teeth in the rear to reduce torque. But in reality if youre fishtailing out of corners you need to learn to control the bike. Giving it full throttle isnt how to do it. Also lowering the front reduces rear end traction and creates more of a pivot point for the rear to swing around. Lower for forks in the clamps and see if that helps with rear end traction.

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6/5/2018 12:09 PM

Lowering the front has only seemed to help the overall feel. It's actually allowed for more traction in the rear as less forward lean in turns is needed to keep the front tire from washing out (which is still wants to do) leaving more traction in the rear. I'll say, the bike has been a struggle to ride.

Been trying my hardest to feather the clutch whether it be 2nd or third, generally not going close to full throttle out of turns. It's just SUPER touchy on the power and loose at front tire. I'm also riding 105 race sag and 42 free sag, so pretty darn perfect.. Appreciate the help..

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6/6/2018 7:49 AM

kb228 wrote:

Then ride 3rd and slip the clutch. Idk what else to tell you. Much ty.

kb droppin' a "Much ty" up in here! laughing

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6/6/2018 7:52 AM

Razmo wrote:

Lowering the front has only seemed to help the overall feel. It's actually allowed for more traction in the rear as less forward lean in turns is needed to keep the front tire from washing out (which is still wants to do) leaving more traction in the rear. I'll say, the bike has been a struggle to ride.

Been trying my hardest to feather the clutch whether it be 2nd or third, generally not going close to full throttle out of turns. It's just SUPER touchy on the power and loose at front tire. I'm also riding 105 race sag and 42 free sag, so pretty darn perfect.. Appreciate the help..

What kind of bike? I don't believe you said above. A 14 millimeter drop on the forks is pretty extreme. I think kb is right about how that is going to affect the rear end. Oh...and "Much ty."

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6/6/2018 8:00 AM

It's an 2007 YZ250F with an FMF Mega Bomb Header/Exhaust, assuming it was re-jetted as well. Loads of power!

Lowering the front to 14mm versus the OEM 5mm hasn't shown any signs of creating less traction in the rear. It's shown to improve front tire traction. With the forks at 14mm it allows me to keep more traction at the rear with my body weight..

Thanks,
Raz

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6/6/2018 8:08 AM

Sheesh, Raz. Noticed you had the bike type in the title! Duh! Sorry. I still think 14 millimeters is too much.

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6/6/2018 8:15 AM

Appreciate it.. I'll likely give 10mm a try..

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6/6/2018 3:38 PM

I second the opinion that 14mm is too much fork above your triple clamps. Want the same effect of putting more weight on the front? Run a little less sag. I used to run 95mm on my YZ125s because Yamahas are so stable anyway... don't need the rear end to squat that much. Speed up your rebound a little if you do this otherwise the shock will feel dead.

As for your gearing, it's simple: if you never feel like you are going full speed in top gear, add a tooth or two to the rear. It will lower your gearing, enabling you to use 3rd more often. On the contrary, if you find you rev out all the time and top gear isn't tall enough, drop a tooth or two and go back to using 2nd in the turns.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

6/7/2018 10:56 AM

Here's the thing, I had the most trouble controlling the rear end traction out of corners at the OEM 5mm and 95mm of sag. I tried it. I actually took a spill last fall, and nearly severed my left MCL. Was fortunate enough to not need surgery. I believe it had to do with my trying to put most of my weight forward to keep the front tire from washing out on me, resulting in even lesser traction at the rear tire.

I had the same problem, maybe not as bad, at the OEM 5mm and 100mm of sag. Now that I think of it, don't think I've tried 105 race sag and 5mm at the fork as my thought was to try 95mm first without adjusting fork height. Overall, I feel 105/40 is where you want to be no matter the bike. Make all adjustments from there.

Hmmm, maybe going 10mm is the nest step at 105 race 40 static (105/42 to be exact). Just worry that front end will want to wash out on me more than it does at 14mm. I'll give it try. Suppose re-valving the suspension would be helpful as well.

Raz

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6/7/2018 11:18 AM

Finally.. youre realizing that putting all the weight on the front by raising the forks and reducing sag doesnt help rear end traction......................

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6/7/2018 1:20 PM

I raised the forks to aid front end traction, which has helped. Regarding sag, regardless of the what the manual says, if you can achieve 105/40 or close, that's about as perfect as you can get no matter the make of the bike from my understanding. Dial in all other adjustment from there.. whether it be gearing, fork height, re-valving, compression, rebound, etc.. Sound about right?

I am leaning toward trying 10mm to see how she performs at 105/42, but I have a feeling things won't change much.

Regarding gearing, since I seem to be on the low end of 3rd most often, I'll likely try adding a tooth or two at the rear sprocket, appreciate it Falcon.

Raz

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