1988 CR250 Project

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10/30/2013 11:37 AM
Edited Date/Time: 10/30/2013 11:39 AM

Well, I had a lot of time to think about my next bike during an 18 month layoff due to a neck injury. All is well now and I am reaching into my past for this one. I raced a 1988 CR125 back 88-89 and it was probably my favorite bike ever. I am not looking to ride wide open to get around the track at a decent pace (for now), so I went with the 1988 CR250 instead. If this works out, I can see getting a matching 125 down the road.

I got it for $200 with the seller explaining that it needs a top end because someone "put the wrong gas in it". It has a rusted out dented pro circuit pipe, but the deal included an almost brand new stock pipe. It has been neglected, but doesn't appear to have been abused too bad.

I dropped it off at 2 Stroke Specialties for a complete top and bottom end and suspension rebuild. I am planning on tearing it down and starting the restoration when I get it back with the fresh motor.

Sorry about the crappy cell phone pics.

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10/30/2013 1:23 PM

Daaa-aaam! I'll give you $250 for it right now. Cash. tongue

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10/30/2013 1:29 PM

Haha. My budget was $300 to $500 for the purchase. I was very happy with the price. He was only asking $200 (with title). I probably could have talked him down a little, but I thought it was more than fair.

I am more excited about this bike than any other I have purchased in the last 20 years.

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10/30/2013 3:09 PM

My goodness that was cheap.

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10/30/2013 3:17 PM

I just got a call from the shop and they offered to donate a set of rebuilt 1999 CR250 forks (and whatever clamps are needed) to my rebuild. They are pretty excited about this build too. I guess they don't get many from that era.

I know it may sound sacrilegious to not keep it all original, but do you think it would help the handling? This will not be a garage queen.

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10/30/2013 3:29 PM

I'm doing a 1988 cr125 for my senior project. I love the look of these bikes. Good luck.

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10/30/2013 3:31 PM

You already have some of the best forks available on that bike. I think if you put (much) later forks on it will ruin the project. Just my tuppence worth.

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10/30/2013 4:00 PM
Edited Date/Time: 10/30/2013 4:01 PM

I guess I could have them rebuild the stock ones in addition to putting on the newer forks. That way I could try them both and use the the ones that work better. Would it look any different with the 99 forks than it would with 89 forks (I know the 88s are better, just wondering if it a looks thing or just the integrity of a rebuild/restore)?

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10/30/2013 4:09 PM

89's are probably the worst forks you could use.
The 99 forks would probably need a 99 axle and wheel as the axle/bearings are bigger diameter. You may need the brake calliper as well.

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10/30/2013 4:20 PM

I think they are throwing in the entire front end. Works nice for me since the front wheel has a big crack in it. I am not sure how the headset would fit. The 99 had the aluminum frame. I guess I will let them work it out.

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11/1/2013 9:46 AM

Performance wise, it would make more sense to use the 88 forks and swap the cylinder for the 89 version. The 88 was a step backward from the 87 in terms of engine and suspension and then in 89 it had a killer engine and ridiculous forks.

If you want to go upside down, I know that 92 (not 91, not 93) clamps and forks bolt right up to your 88 head tube. Your 88 front wheel will work with these forks. Then fab up something that looks like those gray fork guards that the factory Honda's had back then and you'll really have something! I wanted to do this on my 87 to make it look factory so I got a 92 fork/clamp but decided to keep my 87 stock. If you want the 92 forks/clamps let me know. I have one of those translucent factory front number plates for it too.

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11/3/2013 4:23 PM

jtracing6 wrote:

You already have some of the best forks available on that bike. I think if you put (much) later forks on it will ruin the project. Just my tuppence worth.

Agreed , re-built the stock forks
and the 88-91 Cylinder reed version motors were some of the fastest ever 250 Honda motors

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3/7/2014 2:20 PM

OK, the motor has been done for a while and I am ready to starting cleaning everything else up. I ordered a replica seat cover from ebay, but am having trouble finding plastics. Does anyone have a source for plastics that will match the OEM style and color.

By the way, I decided to stick with the stock forks and just had them rebuilt..

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3/7/2014 3:40 PM

UFO should have all the plastic for this bike.

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125 Rider

3/7/2014 4:03 PM

Thanks MXM! UFO does have it all separately. I was googling plastic kits and could't find anything.

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3/9/2014 9:27 PM

you can have all plastic here http://www.ufoplasticusa.com/

in max 2 weeks at home

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3/10/2014 8:16 AM

>UFO should have all the plastic for this bike.

You can get the complete kit from Motosport. Since it's a kit, there should be a discount, plus they throw in free shipping for purchases over $100. In most cases, the plastic UFO makes is superior to what Honda used during this era. I switched to all UFO plastic for my '89 project bike.

>Performance wise, it would make more sense to use the 88 forks and swap the cylinder for the 89 version.

DJ knows from experience. He owned the '88 and has had tons of hours riding a buddy's '89. I think all his recommendations are excellent, IMHO.

>You already have some of the best forks available on that bike. I think if you put (much) later forks on it will ruin the project. Just my tuppence worth.

The '88 is stunning with the all red scheme and fork boots. These two years (88-89) are great looking bikes, and the Euros in particular seem to have a real thing for them.

If you want a Ricky Johnson or Mickey Diamond clone, DJ's plan is the way to go, in my opinion. It sure would be unique!

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Thanks for the memories and good fellowship guys!

3/10/2014 9:43 AM

I went to Motosport.com and could not locate a plastic kit for my bike, just individual pieces. If there is a kit available, would someone please give me the link?

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3/10/2014 3:39 PM

Just joined, am new to this but let me say I just completed a year long resto myself and it was quite the experience. My bike is a 1988 cr250r, it was done from "scratch" meaning I started from no bike at all. I started purchasing used parts off of eBay in late 2012. All major assemblies were acquired in a used condition and then cleaned, stripped, painted, polished, restored to new condition. I use to have one back in "1989" out in San Diego, Ca. Had to sell it in a move and, well it only took me 25 yrs. but, its even better then before. What I mean is it also has aftermarket parts on it that I knew would only increase the value of it. These parts list as Boyesen Rad Valve, Hinson clutch basket, Honda Racing clutch cover, Honda Racing stator cover, Moto Hose radiator hoses, D.I.D. "Dirt Star" rims & spokes powder coated spoke nipples to match the R134 Honda paint code "Fighting Red" that the frame and plastics are. I can answer your ?

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3/10/2014 5:12 PM

Wow! Nice bike Don! Is it for riding or show only? Is the frame painted or powder coated?

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3/10/2014 5:23 PM

Here's some pic's, hope you enjoy! Would be happy to assist you if you have any questions.Photo

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3/10/2014 5:29 PM

Frame was painted, R134 "Fighting Red" Honda paint code for paint & plastics. Bike is definitely show worthy, I think , just completed it few weeks ago. Just now posting photos. Cost was more than retail new, but it is a love of what you do I guess.

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3/10/2014 5:30 PM

Sweet! How did you you do the frame? Paint/powder coat ?

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3/10/2014 5:36 PM

Painted it my self, made a paint booth on my apt. back patio. Photo

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3/10/2014 5:50 PM

Paint gun or rattle can?

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3/10/2014 6:00 PM

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I used a 2 coat procedure. Base coat/color coat and then a 2k High gloss clear. First I stripped the frame by hand sanding and then an etching primer followed several coats of the color/clear procedure.Photo

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3/10/2014 6:03 PM

>I went to Motosport.com and could not locate a plastic kit for my bike, just individual pieces. If there is a kit available, would someone please give me the link?

Call Motosport and tell them you want to order a kit. They may not have these as kits any more (I bought mine over a year ago), but even if they have only the individual pieces, you'll still get a break on the shipping and their prices are lower than anywhere else I've found.

If they don't have a kit, ask if they will give a kit discount for the individual parts if bought together.

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Thanks for the memories and good fellowship guys!

3/10/2014 6:45 PM

You might want to try VMXRacing.com for your plastics. They have the rear, front fenders, and side panels for the 1988 cr250r a very good replica part, with the original color paint code for the 1988-1989 cr250. Not cheap though.

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3/11/2014 2:59 AM

UFO plastic is very good as good as original.

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3/11/2014 7:23 PM

>You might want to try VMXRacing.com for your plastics. They have the rear, front fenders, and side panels for the 1988 cr250r a very good replica part, with the original color paint code for the 1988-1989 cr250. Not cheap though.

Either those are vacuum formed copies which are not going to fit too closely or they are reselling the UFO. I bought a set of VMX sidecovers for my 1986 CR250 and besides matching the color, they were about the same quality as Maier (they may even be made from Maier molds).

UFO makes complete replacement plastics as far back as '88-'89, the also make a lot of the '86-'87 stuff. Very good quality, I'd stick with the UFO.

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Thanks for the memories and good fellowship guys!