screw gun bit recommendation

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7/9/2018 8:02 PM

What kind of screw gun bits don't blow apart . I can't find any that don't rip apart while driving 3-4 inch long screws in pine . I'm using them in a 18 volt dewalt screw gun.

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7/9/2018 8:15 PM

I've had good luck with Dewalt brand bits. What have been using?

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7/9/2018 8:29 PM

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My neighbor gave me this play set for the kid , I had to redo the cross piece for the swings to attach . I think I've been using the ones from Valu ,so probably Stanley or some shit . I read a review that said the Bosch one and the dewalt ones were the ones to get . Still got a camo tarp for the top , a rock wall to climb in and looking for a slide . It's weird the shit you end up working on when you have kids.
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7/9/2018 9:35 PM

Tungsten bits brand doesn’t matter

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7/10/2018 4:02 AM

You are using the torx drive screws, right?

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7/10/2018 4:16 AM

newmann wrote:

You are using the torx drive screws, right?

Negative ,I've been told that a few times though . My cheap ass just wants to keep using all the Phillips head screws I already have.

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7/10/2018 4:39 AM
Edited Date/Time: 7/10/2018 4:40 AM

Yeah, torx head screws are the way to go, impact drill and torx bits.

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7/10/2018 5:07 AM

www.garagejournal.com for this kind of question! AWESOME site!
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7/10/2018 6:28 AM

newmann wrote:

You are using the torx drive screws, right?

MR. X wrote:

Negative ,I've been told that a few times though . My cheap ass just wants to keep using all the Phillips head screws I already have.

Well, keep enjoying your rounded out screw heads.



tongue

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7/10/2018 6:32 AM
Edited Date/Time: 7/10/2018 6:32 AM

Robertson screws and bits work good also.

Phillips, yuck. wink

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HAF

7/10/2018 7:02 AM

Just looking at the picture, that wood looks like kiln dried spruce. Could be pine but you will have trouble running a 3" drywall screw through 2- 2x4"s unless you drill clearance through the first one. If you don't the bit will break or the screw will strip out like newmann said.

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7/10/2018 7:16 AM

borg wrote:

Just looking at the picture, that wood looks like kiln dried spruce. Could be pine but you will have trouble running a 3" drywall screw through 2- 2x4"s unless you drill clearance through the first one. If you don't the bit will break or the screw will strip out like newmann said.

X2 - It adds a step, but I predrill anything that's going to be outside or close to the edge of a board. Less stress on the driver/bit/screw and it will allow the wood to expand and contract without splitting. Use a drill bit just a hair smaller than the screw's shaft and it will still be plenty tight

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"A motorcycle is a bicycle with a pandemonium attachment and is designed for the especial use of mechanical geniuses, daredevils, and lunatics"  George Fitch, 1916

7/10/2018 7:16 AM

Get the impact-rated torx bits, and get yourself some ceramic coated T25 torx screws. Also, if you don't have a impact wrench, I highly recommend it. You can get a 20v for about $100 most of the time (with one battery).

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7/10/2018 7:23 AM

borg wrote:

Just looking at the picture, that wood looks like kiln dried spruce. Could be pine but you will have trouble running a 3" drywall screw through 2- 2x4"s unless you drill clearance through the first one. If you don't the bit will break or the screw will strip out like newmann said.

Those boards I'm not 100 percent certain on the type . The stuff in my garage I was screwing into was so frigging hard ,that's the job that broke a shit ton of screws and bits . The garage was built in the 50s ,my brother called it yellow pine or something ,he said he's seen that wood on jobs before and it's always rock hard.

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7/10/2018 7:51 AM

borg wrote:

Just looking at the picture, that wood looks like kiln dried spruce. Could be pine but you will have trouble running a 3" drywall screw through 2- 2x4"s unless you drill clearance through the first one. If you don't the bit will break or the screw will strip out like newmann said.

MR. X wrote:

Those boards I'm not 100 percent certain on the type . The stuff in my garage I was screwing into was so frigging hard ,that's the job that broke a shit ton of screws and bits . The garage was built in the 50s ,my brother called it yellow pine or something ,he said he's seen that wood on jobs before and it's always rock hard.

Oh shit yeah. Anything that old would be pretty hard by now. You really do have pre drill almost no matter what kind of screw or bit. I work with maple and cherry. You have to pre drill for even tiny little #4 wood screws or the heads will strip.

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7/10/2018 10:02 AM

KDXGarage wrote: www.garagejournal.com for this kind of question! AWESOME site!

That’s a cool site, thanks. I set up an account.

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7/10/2018 3:40 PM

DoctorJD wrote:

Get the impact-rated torx bits, and get yourself some ceramic coated T25 torx screws. Also, if you don't have a impact wrench, I highly recommend it. You can get a 20v for about $100 most of the time (with one battery).

What this guy said. I've had pretty good luck with the Milwaukee brand made for the impact driver.
Night and day difference when you use the impact vs drill driver.

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www.alljackedupinc.com home of the Switch Hauler, the only modular hauling system www.sprocketstuff.com home of the Counter Sprocket Tool

7/10/2018 3:55 PM

Definitely need to pre-drill your holes in hard/dry woods. The screw is not tough enough to do that. So you will end up with a lot of stripped or broken off screws and bits.

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7/10/2018 5:59 PM

ToolMaker wrote:

What this guy said. I've had pretty good luck with the Milwaukee brand made for the impact driver.
Night and day difference when you use the impact vs drill driver.

I'm using the 18 volt dewalt impact driver , it's a bit on the heavy side but its fine for home work.

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7/10/2018 11:28 PM

I love my Porter Cable driver. All of the big brands are good. Just get a complete set so your tools use the same batteries.

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7/11/2018 8:04 AM

Robertson or Torx head screws and drivers. Philips heads suck.

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7/11/2018 12:42 PM

I'll let my trophies speak for themselves. What do you want to know? lol

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OK, so I've spent years in the shop making 20 chairs a day, 100 screws per chair. I've done a lot of screwing around. My favorite screw gun is a Milwaukee. They are the fastest, lightest,slimmest, most durable. At least they were. I don't know about now they manufacture from China.
It all depends on what the screw is made out of, stainless, dacrotized, galvanized, length and number size. I find square head to be the best, especially on a stainless steel screw.
As far as the tip of the gun, there is no "greatest tip ever" available on the market. Some of the best things you can do is just modify your own. For most people shorter is better. One trick is to take the shit off the gun that comes with it like the depth stop and toss it, but also pull the factory tip out of it and buy a 1/4 or a hex bolt driver at the hardware store. You can find one that will snap right into your screw gun and it will only stick out the end about a 1/2" You can then insert your tip directly into that. If you were doing a big project, like a whole deck or something like that, magnetic holding is not going to work for long. Don't be afraid to take some duck tape, put it in strips and use it to secure the bit. I have often taken a piece of tape, put on the bit itself and jammed it into the concrete to wedge it in. It works.

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7/11/2018 4:14 PM

FlickitFlat wrote:

I'll let my trophies speak for themselves. What do you want to know? lol

Photo

OK, so I've spent years in the shop making 20 chairs a day, 100 screws per chair. I've done a lot of screwing around. My favorite screw gun is a Milwaukee. They are the fastest, lightest,slimmest, most durable. At least they were. I don't know about now they manufacture from China.
It all depends on what the screw is made out of, stainless, dacrotized, galvanized, length and number size. I find square head to be the best, especially on a stainless steel screw.
As far as the tip of the gun, there is no "greatest tip ever" available on the market. Some of the best things you can do is just modify your own. For most people shorter is better. One trick is to take the shit off the gun that comes with it like the depth stop and toss it, but also pull the factory tip out of it and buy a 1/4 or a hex bolt driver at the hardware store. You can find one that will snap right into your screw gun and it will only stick out the end about a 1/2" You can then insert your tip directly into that. If you were doing a big project, like a whole deck or something like that, magnetic holding is not going to work for long. Don't be afraid to take some duck tape, put it in strips and use it to secure the bit. I have often taken a piece of tape, put on the bit itself and jammed it into the concrete to wedge it in. It works.

Milwaukee seems to be the same quality as the older tools, and getting thinner and lighter with more power. Can’t beat the warranty either imo. They’ve replaced two of my drills no questions asked after one was fried from a chinese battery and the other one had the chuck come out of alignment and it would get stuck to the point where I have to use channellocks to open it. Still use it and have the new one in the box still.

@OP Buy a torx bit and 3” screws and you won’t regret it. Using a Phillips bit and drywall screws are fine for small projects, but I wouldn’t use them on anything structural. Get a pail of deck screws in the length you need and get peace of mind knowing they’re meant for the job. Most come with the appropriate bit for it aswell.

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If you're not mixing gas, you're not haulin ass.

7/11/2018 5:50 PM
Edited Date/Time: 7/11/2018 5:51 PM

We use these screws and a bit comes in each box:
http://www.spax.us/
Home Depot carries them but I am not sure if they have all the products. We only use the cabinet ones, they work great.

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7/11/2018 6:52 PM

Milwaukee is not cheaping out, a bit more expensive, but that's a tool that hasn't let me down.
Makita is solid as well.

Get an impact driver, drill motors will wear you and everything out.

For sure torx screws work light years better than Phillips. Phillips is fine for drywall, but trying to do work, they are weak.

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Go for it! Don't let a little thing like fear, or common sense hold you back.

7/11/2018 7:23 PM

Page 86 in this catalog is what I was talking about, the standard duty driving bits. They are the shit if you put them straight in the screw gun. This is a good supplier of screws as well. Sometimes they have delays, sometimes they are right on it. It kind of sucks if you are a manufacture but their products are quality. I've bought literally tons of stuff from them. About a pallet a week for quit a few years. Check them out. I didn't look at the prices but I'm sure you could buy a 50lb box for what you could buy 5lb at Lowes. Better quality also.
http://www.applefasteners.com/

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