What do you want people to remember you by?

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9/5/2018 7:18 PM
Edited Date/Time: 9/8/2018 6:17 PM

Kinda struggled with this over the years. Grew up racing my whole life. Qualified for some nationals. Then one day at my peak Hard Stop due to non moto related illness. Met my future wife towards the end of this period 1998'ish)

Fast forward several years, graduated college. Got married to my girl. Have 4 children between 9-2 years age.

Have a really good job. Very little debt. Enjoy life. But something seems always missing...

Always felt like I could never answer the question of "Who am I". Another way to put it is "what do you want to be remembered by".

First and foremost, my family and my kids are my everything. So "who am I" is a loving father who would do anything for my kids. My family is my life.

Then I started thinking about how can I be a better father, a better husband, a better man. How can I make my kids to be better then what I am. Not by possessions owned, success gained.

Just curious if anyone has ever struggled with these answers.

So my question is, "What do you want people to remember you by."?

No wrong answers. Just an open discussion.

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9/5/2018 7:39 PM

I Imagine we all feel like that.

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GP740
Since 1987

9/5/2018 8:09 PM
Edited Date/Time: 9/5/2018 8:12 PM

I used to care but don't anymore. I won't be remembered, and it really doesn't matter anyway. Hope that's not too negative. smile Life is extremely short, and now I'm just trying to have as much fun as I possibly can with the few years I've got left, if I even get that much time, who knows? But again, doesn't really matter either way, live for today.

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9/5/2018 8:22 PM
Edited Date/Time: 9/5/2018 8:42 PM

Unless you invent or discover something that all of humanity benefits from, your memory is completely gone within 2-3 generations. Your children have the most to gain from you and will remember you for longer than anyone else. They will be the ones to share your stories with people who arrive after you are gone.

Also, go watch Pixar’s Coco on Netflix.

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9/5/2018 10:01 PM

as long as a few people are around to tell some stories of the fun we had at my funeral then ill die happy,

I used to want to be known, or remembered, but now i just live for fun times with my partner, child and mates,

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9/5/2018 10:09 PM

I see all this potential, and I see it squandered. God damn it, an entire generation pumping gas, waiting tables - slaves with white collars. Advertising has us chasing cars and clothes, working jobs we hate so we can buy shit we don't need. We're the middle children of history, man. No purpose or place. We have no Great War. No Great Depression. Our great war is a spiritual war... Our great depression is our lives. We've all been raised on television to believe that one day we'd all be millionaires, and movie gods, and rock stars, but we won't. We're slowly learning that fact. And we're very, very pissed off.

• Tyler Durden

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9/5/2018 10:35 PM

Until I read the title of this thread, I never thought about it.

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“Adhering to 1970’s Standards of Political Correctness”

9/6/2018 12:07 AM

Man, now that I think about it, fight club might be a good therapy for me.

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GP740
Since 1987

9/6/2018 5:15 AM

Well I like to think of how many famous people die and majority of people never think about them again after the course of a couple days to a week. You have to do something or invent something truely extraordinary to be “remembered” in this day and age. Even a family member, think about it, they did, you’re sad for about a week maybe more or less depending on how close you were with them, and then well, life goes on without them. We could all die tomorrow, you never know when you lay your head down at night you might not wake up, or you might leave for work with perfect timing to be the car that gets sandwiched by an 18 wheeler, and it wouldn’t of happened if you had left 15 seconds earlier/later. You could wake up not feeling well and boom you have cancer. You really just never know.

I hope to live to be 100 the way healthcare will be by the time I’m in my 60’s (40 years from now) but like I said, life’s so unpredictable. I just hope that when I’m on my deathbed I don’t have any regrets, and that I can truely look back and say “I enjoyed life and don’t regret a thing.” Go into an old folks home and talk to a lot of elderly folks, you will see a lot of regret in their eyes, they will say “I wish I wish I wish” and that is truely one of the saddest things, because when you’re 85+ years old, it’s too late, you can’t do anything about it, you can only dwell in your regret.

I hope that if anything, I’m remembered by my kids and family and friends as an extremely positive and happy fun loving guy, who truely enjoyed life and didn’t care what anyone thought about him. When I go to a funeral and I hear people talking about how “great of a guy and how awesome and fun loving” someone was, even after they’re are gone, it still puts a smile on everyone’s face just thinking about them. That’s how I want to be remembered.

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9/6/2018 5:31 AM

I often think about stuff like that , then I became a dad and I always think about what's best for him or try to plan ahead for him .

Just be lucky that you don't strangle yourself with a neck tie while jerking off , you know how those guys get remembered, no matter what they accomplish, they're always the dude that died while jerking off.

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9/6/2018 5:49 AM

I want people to remember me as someone who was a good friend, gave 100% towards everything I did and generous with my time and finances.

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9/6/2018 6:27 AM

Most of us only have one shot at being remembered. That would be your children. Tragically for Void that was taken away from him. If it wasn't for my kids, I would feel exactly the same way Void does. Also, how I want to be remembered is only partially under my control. People can be very deluded about how others actually see them. I guess my answer is, I don't give it that much thought. I do try to avoid situations that might prove to be embarrassing, like being found dead in a bestiality resort with a gerbil up my ass.

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9/6/2018 6:28 AM

rehan53 wrote:

Unless you invent or discover something that all of humanity benefits from, your memory is completely gone within 2-3 generations. Your children have the most to gain from you and will remember you for longer than anyone else. They will be the ones to share your stories with people who arrive after you are gone.

Also, go watch Pixar’s Coco on Netflix.

As I was reading this thread I was trying to think of that movie, Coco. Probably very true. Great underrated movie.

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No Signature.

9/6/2018 10:04 AM

My great aunt lived to be 93 years old. She enjoyed extreme good health over the course of her life. The only times she was ever in the hospital were from a broken leg in a car wreck, pneumonia when she was 82 {they called in the family not expecting her to live through the night,,, but she woke up hungry} and, the last four days of her life. She was trying to help me mow her yard, at 92 years old. Anyway, my great aunt was poorer than dirt. She was a 'notch baby' which means, she only received half of her Social Security benefit. She lived on $483 a month supplemented by a box of cosmetics she sold to people she went to church with. She grew a garden and canned a LOT. Never had cable. Never had air conditioning. Never got food stamps or, any help of any kind. She liked a Klondike ice-cream bar. I'd get her some and take to her just to check on her. She'd finally get to the door and I'd hand them to her. She'd want to hug my neck and talk about how good God is to us. I'd think, Nathalee, you'd be better off in jail...... She had something that I didn't. On the day she died, there were only five people in the room. Her youngest brother, my cousin, a nurse and, my then girlfriend and I. The nurse commented on how easy she was resting and the peaceful look on her face. Suddenly, her eyes opened and she smiled great big. Then, the look on her face... Man, I wish I had a recording of it. She was looking into God's Heaven. There is zero doubt about it in my mind. She left this world, eyes wide open, in awe of where she was going. At the end of 93 years, she traded a wore out Bible and a REALLY good testimony, for a place prepared for her by the King of Kings. I thought, she's not poor anymore. Later that same year, Mercy found me. That 'Something' she had that I didn't, confronted me one Saturday night. Everything changed. When I get where I'm going, I hope people remember me telling them how good God is to us.

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9/6/2018 10:18 AM
Edited Date/Time: 9/6/2018 10:20 AM

Here lies Falcon:
FATHER. HUSBAND. MUSICIAN. SPORTSMAN.


In 100 years or less, nobody will care.



PS- Effing rad, Randy.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

9/6/2018 11:11 AM

That I treated people fairly, did my best, and wasn't a dick.

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9/6/2018 12:31 PM

GuyB wrote:

That I treated people fairly, did my best, and wasn't a dick.

Pretty much how I feel about this subject.

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9/6/2018 1:27 PM

Simple, a good person. Everything else falls in line.

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My wife calls you guys the Yahoos.

9/6/2018 2:40 PM

wreckitrandy wrote:

My great aunt lived to be 93 years old. She enjoyed extreme good health over the course of her life. The only times she was ever in the hospital were from a broken leg in a car wreck, pneumonia when she was 82 {they called in the family not expecting her to live through the night,,, but she woke up hungry} and, the last four days of her life. She was trying to help me mow her yard, at 92 years old. Anyway, my great aunt was poorer than dirt. She was a 'notch baby' which means, she only received half of her Social Security benefit. She lived on $483 a month supplemented by a box of cosmetics she sold to people she went to church with. She grew a garden and canned a LOT. Never had cable. Never had air conditioning. Never got food stamps or, any help of any kind. She liked a Klondike ice-cream bar. I'd get her some and take to her just to check on her. She'd finally get to the door and I'd hand them to her. She'd want to hug my neck and talk about how good God is to us. I'd think, Nathalee, you'd be better off in jail...... She had something that I didn't. On the day she died, there were only five people in the room. Her youngest brother, my cousin, a nurse and, my then girlfriend and I. The nurse commented on how easy she was resting and the peaceful look on her face. Suddenly, her eyes opened and she smiled great big. Then, the look on her face... Man, I wish I had a recording of it. She was looking into God's Heaven. There is zero doubt about it in my mind. She left this world, eyes wide open, in awe of where she was going. At the end of 93 years, she traded a wore out Bible and a REALLY good testimony, for a place prepared for her by the King of Kings. I thought, she's not poor anymore. Later that same year, Mercy found me. That 'Something' she had that I didn't, confronted me one Saturday night. Everything changed. When I get where I'm going, I hope people remember me telling them how good God is to us.

I like that story. Puts a smile on my heart.

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If it ain't yer's don't take it, If it ain't the truth dont say it, If it ain't right don't do it...Marcus Aurelius

9/6/2018 2:54 PM

GuyB wrote:

That I treated people fairly, did my best, and wasn't a dick.

avidchimp wrote:

Pretty much how I feel about this subject.

Not a bad goal. I'd be happy with that as well. A little time on the internet leads me to believe that a lot of folks aren't aiming that high.

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If it ain't yer's don't take it, If it ain't the truth dont say it, If it ain't right don't do it...Marcus Aurelius

9/7/2018 5:48 AM

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9/7/2018 10:43 AM

Remember me as a movie extra.
Latest booking for the CBS Series One Dollar filming in Pittsburgh Photo

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9/7/2018 4:53 PM

Law abiding citizen

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9/7/2018 5:30 PM

hillbilly wrote:

Law abiding citizen

w00t silly devil
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If it ain't yer's don't take it, If it ain't the truth dont say it, If it ain't right don't do it...Marcus Aurelius

9/7/2018 6:00 PM

I guess my truck will be in film as well Photo

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9/9/2018 6:32 AM
Edited Date/Time: 9/9/2018 6:33 AM

wreckitrandy wrote:

My great aunt lived to be 93 years old. She enjoyed extreme good health over the course of her life. The only times she was ever in the hospital were from a broken leg in a car wreck, pneumonia when she was 82 {they called in the family not expecting her to live through the night,,, but she woke up hungry} and, the last four days of her life. She was trying to help me mow her yard, at 92 years old. Anyway, my great aunt was poorer than dirt. She was a 'notch baby' which means, she only received half of her Social Security benefit. She lived on $483 a month supplemented by a box of cosmetics she sold to people she went to church with. She grew a garden and canned a LOT. Never had cable. Never had air conditioning. Never got food stamps or, any help of any kind. She liked a Klondike ice-cream bar. I'd get her some and take to her just to check on her. She'd finally get to the door and I'd hand them to her. She'd want to hug my neck and talk about how good God is to us. I'd think, Nathalee, you'd be better off in jail...... She had something that I didn't. On the day she died, there were only five people in the room. Her youngest brother, my cousin, a nurse and, my then girlfriend and I. The nurse commented on how easy she was resting and the peaceful look on her face. Suddenly, her eyes opened and she smiled great big. Then, the look on her face... Man, I wish I had a recording of it. She was looking into God's Heaven. There is zero doubt about it in my mind. She left this world, eyes wide open, in awe of where she was going. At the end of 93 years, she traded a wore out Bible and a REALLY good testimony, for a place prepared for her by the King of Kings. I thought, she's not poor anymore. Later that same year, Mercy found me. That 'Something' she had that I didn't, confronted me one Saturday night. Everything changed. When I get where I'm going, I hope people remember me telling them how good God is to us.

Awesome! A witness and a testimony!

Great responses from everyone. Interesting to read. I'll likely never be remembered for anything on a large scale.

I do hope my family will say first and foremost that I was a follower of Jesus Christ and raised my kids with Christ at the center of our family. Secondly, that I was a good father and loving husband. And third, that we had a heck of a lot of fun as a family.

Faith and Fun.

Cheers.

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9/9/2018 6:45 AM

Ole Billy jo never had a lick of sense,pass the biscuits please..........

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9/9/2018 9:01 AM

hillbilly wrote:

Ole Billy jo never had a lick of sense,pass the biscuits please..........

Saw a sign at a booth at the fair yesterday...reminded me of you. "NO PEEIN' OFF THE PORCH"

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If it ain't yer's don't take it, If it ain't the truth dont say it, If it ain't right don't do it...Marcus Aurelius

9/9/2018 9:19 AM

Hopefully I'll be remembered as a good, loyal and protective Dad to my daughter.
When my Dad died I realized how much disappears when someone goes- all those experiences, knowledge and lessons learned. You could never write it all down or put it all in a museum. Then I try to hold on to memories, and you realize 99% of experiences you have with a person are forgotten- as years pass you memory of them grows smaller and smaller.
I know that the day I die, life on Earth will keep on rolling right on with hardly a blip, and people will think about it briefly and get on with their lives. That's true even of the people close to us, for the most part. But I think death is a natural part of life so there is no reason to fear it.

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It's impossible for a corporation or government to love you or care about you.

9/9/2018 9:41 AM

hillbilly wrote:

Ole Billy jo never had a lick of sense,pass the biscuits please..........

plowboy wrote:

Saw a sign at a booth at the fair yesterday...reminded me of you. "NO PEEIN' OFF THE PORCH"

Lol. I need that sign.

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I have the right to remain awesome.