The real geographic size of countries.

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12/28/2018 1:06 PM
Edited Date/Time: 12/28/2018 1:08 PM

Most flat maps of the world represent certain countries as much larger than they really are. They are based on the Mercator projection, which is more than 500 years old, but is still used today.
Here are the actual sizes of the USA, Alaska and Canada, compared with South America (much smaller than what I always envisioned):

https://thetruesize.com/#/aboutModal?borders=1~!MTQ3MjM2NjY.NTkwMDU0NQ*MjQ4MjIzNzg(MjYyNzA2Nw~!GL*ODQ2MTA2NA.MTgwNTE2Mw)Ng

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Here is Greenland, which I always thought was huge, but turns out that it's relatively small:

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Isn't it amazing how widespread and commonly accepted things can be, even when they are total illusions? grin



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It's impossible for a corporation or government to love you or care about you.

12/28/2018 1:10 PM

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12/28/2018 1:11 PM

Aaand here is the size of Greenland as represented on the Mercator Projection:

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It's impossible for a corporation or government to love you or care about you.

12/28/2018 1:16 PM

Some of these short videos are pretty good. Here's the map thing explained...


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12/28/2018 1:19 PM

Real size of Russia and the U.K.

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grin







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It's impossible for a corporation or government to love you or care about you.

12/29/2018 8:35 AM

Projection or not, North America is substantially larger than South America.

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12/29/2018 2:42 PM

Foghorn wrote:

Projection or not, North America is substantially larger than South America.

NA: 9.54 million square miles
SA: 6.89 million square miles
Africa: 11.73 million square miles
Asia: 17.21 million square miles
Europe: 3.93 million square miles

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12/29/2018 3:42 PM

Another thing most people don''t understand is how thin our atmosphere actually is, and how close to the surface of the Earth the orbit of the International Space Station actually is, and how small the highest mountain peaks are relative to the size of the earth. For example, if you shrunk the Earth down to the size of a cue ball, the surface would actually be smoother than the surface of a cue ball. On a typical schoolroom globe, the ISS orbit would only be 3/8 of an inch above the surface of the globe at scale.

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