Harry's Plastic Bag RAGE Thread

Related:
Create New Tag

6/27/2019 7:33 AM

The self-checkout thread got me thinking about this. I am so flipping sick of throwing away plastic bags. Normally we bring our own cloth bags, but occasionally we forget and leave them in the truck. When we do, I demand good ole paper sacks. I can put more stuff in a paper sack and usually walk out with only 2 or 3 bags instead of 27 plastic bags. I don't even put my produce in plastic bags anymore if I can help it. Sometimes lettuce is so wet that I don't really have a choice.

WalMart is especially bad with the plastic bags. I buy ten items and usually end up with around 8 bags. I don't have a lot of good to say about California, but I'm pleased my home state took a stand on the plastic bags.

Now, don't go accusing me of being a tree-hugging freak. If you like plastic bags then have at them. Your like of plastic bags is none of my business. While I'm not a tree-hugger, I do feel that we should take steps to lessen our use of plastic bags and other forms of pollution. I've heard the oceans are full of those stupid plastic bags.

Paper sacks are useful around the house. I think I'm going to stop using plastic bags in our kitchen trash can and just do like my Pop did all those years ago. Put a doubled-up paper sack in there.

|

I have so many down votes my down votes have their own down votes.

6/27/2019 7:37 AM

You don't know what you got, 'til its gone

-A Californian.

|

"A link is only as long as your longest strong chain"

6/27/2019 7:46 AM

Agree 100%. Our family has reusable bags for most shopping. On the occasion we get something in a plastic bag, it gets reused as a bathroom trash bag or something like that. Most grocery stores around here charge you for paper or plastic bags or give a discount if you bring your own.

|

6/27/2019 8:13 AM

Some are old enough to remember when paper bags were bad for the environment so everywhere switched to plastic.
At our house we reuse the plastic bags for dog and cat poop. If we don't have them we use biodegradable plasitc bags, or they are claimed biodegradable.

|

No Signature.

6/27/2019 8:27 AM

71Fish wrote:

Some are old enough to remember when paper bags were bad for the environment so everywhere switched to plastic.
At our house we reuse the plastic bags for dog and cat poop. If we don't have them we use biodegradable plasitc bags, or they are claimed biodegradable.

I don't remember that at all. What's the story?

And I sacked groceries for Albertson's in the 1970s. Paper bags were so much easier to sack too. I got so good at it that I could stand back a couple of feet after opening the paper sack and if double bagging was needed I could throw the unopened bag into the open one in a blink of an eye then reach in and pop it open in a half second. Come to think of it, I was way better at that than I am at riding and racing.

Plastic bags have a usefulness for sure, I just wish we weren't almost forced to use them. You ask for a paper sack at WalMart and they look at you like you just grew two more heads and sprouted feathers. .

|

I have so many down votes my down votes have their own down votes.

6/27/2019 8:58 AM
Edited Date/Time: 6/27/2019 9:02 AM

You guys got som shit plastic bags in the US and Canada though. What I can fit in one plastic bag in Sweden probably takes about 4-5 plastic bags in NA. Both small and shit quality

|

6/27/2019 9:25 AM

A company called AmSty has worked with another company to develop a chemical recycling process that enables them to recycle nearly ALL plastics together, even dirty, and come out with a "near virgin" styrene pellet at the end. The chemicals used are filterable and reusable, so it comes close to making plastic use a "closed loop" if people are willing to separate it from regular organic trash. The show was on the Science Channel about a month ago. If this proves viable, then the only real drawback on plastic recycling will be that it is tougher to get as much weight on a truck than you can with fiber, so the per pound cost to truck it is higher.

Recycling paper is a pretty nasty business too. Check out the chemical ponds at this paper plant, and how close it is to the river.


|

6/27/2019 9:27 AM

I put my dirty air filters in them when Im at the track and oil the clean filters in one when Im at home. We also use them for bathroom trash cans. We reuse every one we get at least once.

|

6/27/2019 9:29 AM

Moab has banned plastic bags, wish i had known as when i walked across the street to buy a bunch of shit at Maverick i had a hell of a time getting it all back to my hotel

i'm all for getting rid of plastic bags, we use cloth bags at the grocery store

|

6/27/2019 9:36 AM

Stuntman949 wrote:

You don't know what you got, 'til its gone

-A Californian.

I think that was a Canuck by the name of Joni.

Or maybe she lived down there, not sure...

|

HAF

6/27/2019 9:43 AM

APLMAN99 wrote:

A company called AmSty has worked with another company to develop a chemical recycling process that enables them to recycle nearly ALL plastics together, even dirty, and come out with a "near virgin" styrene pellet at the end. The chemicals used are filterable and reusable, so it comes close to making plastic use a "closed loop" if people are willing to separate it from regular organic trash. The show was on the Science Channel about a month ago. If this proves viable, then the only real drawback on plastic recycling will be that it is tougher to get as much weight on a truck than you can with fiber, so the per pound cost to truck it is higher.

Recycling paper is a pretty nasty business too. Check out the chemical ponds at this paper plant, and how close it is to the river.


I'm still curious as to why the good ole paper sack is environmentally dangerous. I don't get that one. You put that in a landfill and it's going to disappear after a while. The billions of plastic bags we're putting in landfills are gonna still be there in a thousand years. I can see where the ink on a paper sack might be a pollution problem, but that's easy to solve by just not printing anything on them. As far as I can tell, trees are a renewable resource, but petroleum used in plastic bag manufacturing is apparently not. Anyhow, AP, thanks for the info.

As noted in my op, I'm not militant about this. I don't expect anybody to adopt or change to my way of thinking. I just know I got sick up and fed with bringing home 20 plastic bags and throwing them into my plastic bag lined kitchen trash can. I'm over it. When I first started doing this some time back, wife and I were at the market. I was putting lemons, limes, onions, corn, peaches, apples, in the buggy without any plastic bags. She said, "You aren't going to put that stuff in bags?" I replied that I was not. What's the difference? I'm going to wash it all anyway.

|

I have so many down votes my down votes have their own down votes.

6/27/2019 9:49 AM

I like plastic bags. I even use them as luggage.

|

6/27/2019 9:51 AM

Harry Backmon wrote:

I'm still curious as to why the good ole paper sack is environmentally dangerous. I don't get that one. You put that in a landfill and it's going to disappear after a while. The billions of plastic bags we're putting in landfills are gonna still be there in a thousand years. I can see where the ink on a paper sack might be a pollution problem, but that's easy to solve by just not printing anything on them. As far as I can tell, trees are a renewable resource, but petroleum used in plastic bag manufacturing is apparently not. Anyhow, AP, thanks for the info.

As noted in my op, I'm not militant about this. I don't expect anybody to adopt or change to my way of thinking. I just know I got sick up and fed with bringing home 20 plastic bags and throwing them into my plastic bag lined kitchen trash can. I'm over it. When I first started doing this some time back, wife and I were at the market. I was putting lemons, limes, onions, corn, peaches, apples, in the buggy without any plastic bags. She said, "You aren't going to put that stuff in bags?" I replied that I was not. What's the difference? I'm going to wash it all anyway.

Paper bags are made of trees, back in the 80s/90s that was considered the big deal and the time recycling really started to take off. I suspect the plastic bags were much cheaper for the store to purchase is the real reason for the switch but I don't have proof.

I use reusable grocery bags alot, but also reuse every plastic bag I bring home before throwing out. Other countries are much more concerned about seperating trash than we are. When you look at it, it's pretty easy to create a crazy amount of trash for a family for a week just mainly from food packaging. No matter how you feel about reducing, reusing, and recycling, you gotta admit there's nothing uglier than a bunch of plastic shopping bags stuck in the bushes on the side of the road.

|

6/27/2019 10:15 AM

XXVoid MainXX wrote:

I like plastic bags. I even use them as luggage.

LOL. Reminds me of this.

|

"Sorry Goose, but it's time to buzz the tower."

6/27/2019 10:25 AM

APLMAN99 wrote:

A company called AmSty has worked with another company to develop a chemical recycling process that enables them to recycle nearly ALL plastics together, even dirty, and come out with a "near virgin" styrene pellet at the end. The chemicals used are filterable and reusable, so it comes close to making plastic use a "closed loop" if people are willing to separate it from regular organic trash. The show was on the Science Channel about a month ago. If this proves viable, then the only real drawback on plastic recycling will be that it is tougher to get as much weight on a truck than you can with fiber, so the per pound cost to truck it is higher.

Recycling paper is a pretty nasty business too. Check out the chemical ponds at this paper plant, and how close it is to the river.


Harry Backmon wrote:

I'm still curious as to why the good ole paper sack is environmentally dangerous. I don't get that one. You put that in a landfill and it's going to disappear after a while. The billions of plastic bags we're putting in landfills are gonna still be there in a thousand years. I can see where the ink on a paper sack might be a pollution problem, but that's easy to solve by just not printing anything on them. As far as I can tell, trees are a renewable resource, but petroleum used in plastic bag manufacturing is apparently not. Anyhow, AP, thanks for the info.

As noted in my op, I'm not militant about this. I don't expect anybody to adopt or change to my way of thinking. I just know I got sick up and fed with bringing home 20 plastic bags and throwing them into my plastic bag lined kitchen trash can. I'm over it. When I first started doing this some time back, wife and I were at the market. I was putting lemons, limes, onions, corn, peaches, apples, in the buggy without any plastic bags. She said, "You aren't going to put that stuff in bags?" I replied that I was not. What's the difference? I'm going to wash it all anyway.

There's about a million or more takes online about the effects of each, but the general middle of the road numbers I have seen is that you have to reuse paper bags a little over 3 times to equal the total environmental impact of a plastic bag, and you have to reuse a cotton bag over 130 times. That's a bunch.

I think the environmental impact of the paper is in the actual production of it, as those chemical pools in the picture show. Not to mention that when you are shipping them, you probably get less than 10% of the amount of paper bags on a truck, etc.

I actually like the paper bags with handles that they have started using around the Seattle area. They are a lot more substantial than the old paper bags, but the downside is when it's rainy and they get wet. My wife uses the tyvek-looking reusable bags most of the time, but there are enough unplanned stops at the store that we keep a pretty decent supply of the thin plastic bags to reuse.

Whatever you use is going to have some negative impact, it just comes down to how many times you can reuse whatever you choose.

|

6/27/2019 10:26 AM

I use them to carry my lunch to work . Also when I clean the dog crap from the yard.
Walmarts in our area are getting rid of plastic bags. Bring your own bags or they will have some type of bag to sell you. Similar to Aldi foods.

|

6/27/2019 10:35 AM

APLMAN99 wrote:

A company called AmSty has worked with another company to develop a chemical recycling process that enables them to recycle nearly ALL plastics together, even dirty, and come out with a "near virgin" styrene pellet at the end. The chemicals used are filterable and reusable, so it comes close to making plastic use a "closed loop" if people are willing to separate it from regular organic trash. The show was on the Science Channel about a month ago. If this proves viable, then the only real drawback on plastic recycling will be that it is tougher to get as much weight on a truck than you can with fiber, so the per pound cost to truck it is higher.

Recycling paper is a pretty nasty business too. Check out the chemical ponds at this paper plant, and how close it is to the river.


Harry Backmon wrote:

I'm still curious as to why the good ole paper sack is environmentally dangerous. I don't get that one. You put that in a landfill and it's going to disappear after a while. The billions of plastic bags we're putting in landfills are gonna still be there in a thousand years. I can see where the ink on a paper sack might be a pollution problem, but that's easy to solve by just not printing anything on them. As far as I can tell, trees are a renewable resource, but petroleum used in plastic bag manufacturing is apparently not. Anyhow, AP, thanks for the info.

As noted in my op, I'm not militant about this. I don't expect anybody to adopt or change to my way of thinking. I just know I got sick up and fed with bringing home 20 plastic bags and throwing them into my plastic bag lined kitchen trash can. I'm over it. When I first started doing this some time back, wife and I were at the market. I was putting lemons, limes, onions, corn, peaches, apples, in the buggy without any plastic bags. She said, "You aren't going to put that stuff in bags?" I replied that I was not. What's the difference? I'm going to wash it all anyway.

APLMAN99 wrote:

There's about a million or more takes online about the effects of each, but the general middle of the road numbers I have seen is that you have to reuse paper bags a little over 3 times to equal the total environmental impact of a plastic bag, and you have to reuse a cotton bag over 130 times. That's a bunch.

I think the environmental impact of the paper is in the actual production of it, as those chemical pools in the picture show. Not to mention that when you are shipping them, you probably get less than 10% of the amount of paper bags on a truck, etc.

I actually like the paper bags with handles that they have started using around the Seattle area. They are a lot more substantial than the old paper bags, but the downside is when it's rainy and they get wet. My wife uses the tyvek-looking reusable bags most of the time, but there are enough unplanned stops at the store that we keep a pretty decent supply of the thin plastic bags to reuse.

Whatever you use is going to have some negative impact, it just comes down to how many times you can reuse whatever you choose.

Good info, AP. Thanks! One thing I'm sure of is that we'd have a lot less pollution in the oceans if we got rid of plastic bags.

|

I have so many down votes my down votes have their own down votes.

6/27/2019 11:28 AM

We bring our own cloth bags for years but now we get groceries delivered and end up with so many plastic bags.

|

I don't have to be as smart as you hope to be some day anymore.

6/27/2019 11:38 AM

XXVoid MainXX wrote:

I like plastic bags. I even use them as luggage.

And they are great for putting Dog shit in while pooper scooping. And Baby diapers too.

|

6/27/2019 12:24 PM




Better remember your reusable bags at a store in Vancouver or they bag shame you and you walk out with one of these jewels!
|

much ty. How to spot a paid forum poster/artificial forum traffic producer (see list of actions/phrases below):

Copius pattern amounts of phrases like “Anyone have”..., “Anybody know?”.... and their variations.

Thoughts?
Any help is appreciated!
Thanks in advance!





6/27/2019 12:47 PM

peelout wrote:

Moab has banned plastic bags, wish i had known as when i walked across the street to buy a bunch of shit at Maverick i had a hell of a time getting it all back to my hotel

i'm all for getting rid of plastic bags, we use cloth bags at the grocery store

Found that out when we were there last week. Had cloth bags since that's what we carried dogfood in, plus City Mart and the liquor store had paper bags.

|

No Signature.

6/27/2019 12:48 PM

Best product ever for snuffing out the little asshole kids in the neighborhood. Readily available no fuss no muss ... too bad they can't make Julienne fries.

|

6/27/2019 4:47 PM

kzizok wrote:


Better remember your reusable bags at a store in Vancouver or they bag shame you and you walk out with one of these jewels!

At least back in the day the adult video store gave plain black plastic bags.

|

No Signature.

6/27/2019 6:53 PM
Edited Date/Time: 6/27/2019 6:59 PM

There was a pretty decent BBC article some time ago about the pros and cons of paper vs plastic bags. Plastic bags are not as bad as you have been led to believe. A significant amount of industrial pollution goes into making bags. More so far paper bags then plastic bags and even worse for fabric bags. Essentially if you get your groceries in a plastic bag, and then reuse that plastic bag, you are being more environmentally friendly then just using a paper bag once. There is some pretty good information on this topic you can research. Fabric bags are considered the worst because of the pollution and waste product that goes into the fabric bag making process. Most of the fabric bags are all dyed or stamped with product logos. Thus increasing dangerous waste byproducts needed to create these so called eco friendly bags in the first place.

But hey, it feels good to ban plastic bags. And force everyone to use paper or fabric bags. This of course means you don’t understand and account for the industrial pollution in the equation at all. But hey, it’s plastic so it must be bad. That’s what we are told.

|

6/27/2019 7:26 PM

And plastic bottles. And those plastic straps that hold 6 plastic bottles together.
Ban them.
Go back to glass bottles. No chemical leaching when in the sun. Deposits included in the price of the bottle so kids can learn how to make money at a young age.
Build solar powered glass factories in the middle of the desert to melt the sand.

Effin no brainier, everyone wins.

|

6/27/2019 7:28 PM

TXDirt wrote:

There was a pretty decent BBC article some time ago about the pros and cons of paper vs plastic bags. Plastic bags are not as bad as you have been led to believe. A significant amount of industrial pollution goes into making bags. More so far paper bags then plastic bags and even worse for fabric bags. Essentially if you get your groceries in a plastic bag, and then reuse that plastic bag, you are being more environmentally friendly then just using a paper bag once. There is some pretty good information on this topic you can research. Fabric bags are considered the worst because of the pollution and waste product that goes into the fabric bag making process. Most of the fabric bags are all dyed or stamped with product logos. Thus increasing dangerous waste byproducts needed to create these so called eco friendly bags in the first place.

But hey, it feels good to ban plastic bags. And force everyone to use paper or fabric bags. This of course means you don’t understand and account for the industrial pollution in the equation at all. But hey, it’s plastic so it must be bad. That’s what we are told.

Have you read about all the plastic crap that they are finding in the stomachs of dead whales and dolphins?

|

6/27/2019 7:30 PM

I saved them, use them when I go to the line and it’s raining, we have to pay for them here in New York, 5 cents a bag

|

If you like uncle tony's meatballs, you'll love his sausage

Now that's Italian

6/27/2019 7:52 PM

TXDirt wrote:

There was a pretty decent BBC article some time ago about the pros and cons of paper vs plastic bags. Plastic bags are not as bad as you have been led to believe. A significant amount of industrial pollution goes into making bags. More so far paper bags then plastic bags and even worse for fabric bags. Essentially if you get your groceries in a plastic bag, and then reuse that plastic bag, you are being more environmentally friendly then just using a paper bag once. There is some pretty good information on this topic you can research. Fabric bags are considered the worst because of the pollution and waste product that goes into the fabric bag making process. Most of the fabric bags are all dyed or stamped with product logos. Thus increasing dangerous waste byproducts needed to create these so called eco friendly bags in the first place.

But hey, it feels good to ban plastic bags. And force everyone to use paper or fabric bags. This of course means you don’t understand and account for the industrial pollution in the equation at all. But hey, it’s plastic so it must be bad. That’s what we are told.

motogrady wrote:

Have you read about all the plastic crap that they are finding in the stomachs of dead whales and dolphins?

Have you seen the industrial byproducts being dumped into rivers. You are seeing one end of this. Yes, it sucks to see a picture of a dolphin with plastic in its stomach. I get that you see that photo and want to do something about it. So let’s stop all plastic bag usage. And let’s force everyone to use reusable fabric type bags. You will feel better sure. You would need to make millions upon millions of these new bags. The industrial pollution would be immense. What if this net effect would wipe out whole species of birds or perhaps fish. Have you actually solved anything.

Getting rid of plastic bags would have very adverse consequences you may not think about. You are simply solving one problem by creating another possible worse problem.

That’s all I’m saying...

We re-use our plastic bags and can sometimes get 3-4 uses out of them depending on what we use it for.

|

6/27/2019 8:19 PM

TXDirt wrote:

There was a pretty decent BBC article some time ago about the pros and cons of paper vs plastic bags. Plastic bags are not as bad as you have been led to believe. A significant amount of industrial pollution goes into making bags. More so far paper bags then plastic bags and even worse for fabric bags. Essentially if you get your groceries in a plastic bag, and then reuse that plastic bag, you are being more environmentally friendly then just using a paper bag once. There is some pretty good information on this topic you can research. Fabric bags are considered the worst because of the pollution and waste product that goes into the fabric bag making process. Most of the fabric bags are all dyed or stamped with product logos. Thus increasing dangerous waste byproducts needed to create these so called eco friendly bags in the first place.

But hey, it feels good to ban plastic bags. And force everyone to use paper or fabric bags. This of course means you don’t understand and account for the industrial pollution in the equation at all. But hey, it’s plastic so it must be bad. That’s what we are told.

motogrady wrote:

Have you read about all the plastic crap that they are finding in the stomachs of dead whales and dolphins?

TXDirt wrote:

Have you seen the industrial byproducts being dumped into rivers. You are seeing one end of this. Yes, it sucks to see a picture of a dolphin with plastic in its stomach. I get that you see that photo and want to do something about it. So let’s stop all plastic bag usage. And let’s force everyone to use reusable fabric type bags. You will feel better sure. You would need to make millions upon millions of these new bags. The industrial pollution would be immense. What if this net effect would wipe out whole species of birds or perhaps fish. Have you actually solved anything.

Getting rid of plastic bags would have very adverse consequences you may not think about. You are simply solving one problem by creating another possible worse problem.

That’s all I’m saying...

We re-use our plastic bags and can sometimes get 3-4 uses out of them depending on what we use it for.

This isn't 1971 and the love canal.

Get those engineers off their butts and get to making renewal or biodegradable products, without
turning rivers into liquid that burns.

It's effing scary.

Anyone catch the massive blobs of plastic coagulating out in the middle of the Pacific?
WTF?

Plastic. A byproduct of oil, cheap, easy to make and thus attractive to big business.
That's why it's everywhere.

|

6/27/2019 8:20 PM

I may be entering a no go zone here but the reason that there is so much trash in the ocean and everywhere else, is because of trashy people. The plastic bags that you see up against fences and floating in the ocean do not come from responsible people.

I used to fish in a stream not too far from here about 40 years ago. Fast forward to when my son was about 8 and I took him to my old fishing spot. There were a lot more people there than I remembered but we found a spot and within about 5 minutes, a soiled plastic diaper came floating by. Then some other trash. We walked around the bend and there was a group picknicking. We left and on the way back down we saw more of the same. Trash everywhere. I will refrain from mentioning the nationality/race/ethnicity of these people who had taken over the area but there are certain cultures that are way more responsible for the runaway trash than others.

Plastic bags that I get from Home Depot all get re used for many things. When I'm done, they go into my trash which goes to a landfill far away from the ocean.

Nuff said.

|