Physics with Falcon (and others)

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8/4/2021 10:59 AM

Falcon wrote:

^It looks like the math involved in the above is for bullets with air resistance, which I agree has some effect on the bullet. ...more

APLMAN99 wrote:

True, but we don't live in a vacuum.......!

cool

People on the Moon will. cool

laughing laughing laughing laughing

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Braaapin' aint easy.

8/4/2021 11:02 AM

Falcon wrote:

^It looks like the math involved in the above is for bullets with air resistance, which I agree has some effect on the bullet. ...more

APLMAN99 wrote:

True, but we don't live in a vacuum.......!

cool

Falcon wrote:

People on the Moon will. cool

laughing laughing laughing laughing

Probably, but right now that population is zero so I won't mind too much....!

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8/4/2021 12:15 PM

Robgvx wrote:

So, do you weigh more at the poles than at the equator?

Theory being that at the equator you have centrifugal force acting ...more

Falcon wrote:

You most certainly do weigh more at the poles. I read the amount once and it was significant. I can't remember how much, but ...more

Falcon wrote:

Here's a great read about it. Pretty concise, as well: ...more

Sort of along the same lines , your head is older than your feet … unless you spend a lot of time hanging upside down .

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8/4/2021 2:33 PM

Falcon wrote:

^It looks like the math involved in the above is for bullets with air resistance, which I agree has some effect on the bullet. ...more

APLMAN99 wrote:

True, but we don't live in a vacuum.......!

cool

Falcon wrote:

People on the Moon will. cool

laughing laughing laughing laughing

But you can't shoot the gun on the moon.

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8/4/2021 2:46 PM

APLMAN99 wrote:

True, but we don't live in a vacuum.......!

cool

Falcon wrote:

People on the Moon will. cool

laughing laughing laughing laughing

Log Hopper wrote:

But you can't shoot the gun on the moon.

Sure you can: https://www.livescience.com/18588-shoot-gun-space.html

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Braaapin' aint easy.

8/5/2021 5:59 AM

APLMAN99 wrote:

True, but we don't live in a vacuum.......!

cool

Falcon wrote:

People on the Moon will. cool

laughing laughing laughing laughing

Log Hopper wrote:

But you can't shoot the gun on the moon.

Bullets being airtight would allow it.

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Go for it! Don't let a little thing like fear, or common sense hold you back.

8/6/2021 10:08 PM

Shouldn’t all of the explosions in Star Wars been silent ? Actually all of the outdoor scenes being silent might be too boring to handle.

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8/7/2021 12:28 PM

Rawly wrote:

Shouldn’t all of the explosions in Star Wars been silent ? Actually all of the outdoor scenes being silent might be too boring ...more

Why?
I'm asking because I don't know.
Radio waves move in space, why wouldn't sound waves?

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Go for it! Don't let a little thing like fear, or common sense hold you back.

8/7/2021 1:56 PM

SEEMEFIRST wrote:

Why?
I'm asking because I don't know.
Radio waves move in space, why wouldn't sound waves?

Because sound is vibrations in the air I believe.

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8/7/2021 2:42 PM

Rawly wrote:

Shouldn’t all of the explosions in Star Wars been silent ? Actually all of the outdoor scenes being silent might be too boring ...more

SEEMEFIRST wrote:

Why?
I'm asking because I don't know.
Radio waves move in space, why wouldn't sound waves?

Robgvx wrote:

Because sound is vibrations in the air I believe.

Makes sense.
I never really considered it before.

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Go for it! Don't let a little thing like fear, or common sense hold you back.

8/7/2021 3:49 PM

Rawly wrote:

Shouldn’t all of the explosions in Star Wars been silent ? Actually all of the outdoor scenes being silent might be too boring ...more

The spacecraft movements are based upon the physics of the earth for the most part, as well.

But I always viewed it as a fictional tale, so it never really bothered me.

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8/8/2021 1:21 PM

Falcon wrote:

You most certainly do weigh more at the poles. I read the amount once and it was significant. I can't remember how much, but ...more

Falcon wrote:

Here's a great read about it. Pretty concise, as well: ...more

lestat wrote:

Sort of along the same lines , your head is older than your feet … unless you spend a lot of time hanging upside down .

I thought that was going to go the opposite way with your head on a larger radius from the earths center therefore spinning(moving) faster and aging slower. Had to search it to get the gravity related time differential.

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8/9/2021 4:19 AM

Falcon wrote:

You most certainly do weigh more at the poles. I read the amount once and it was significant. I can't remember how much, but ...more

Falcon wrote:

Here's a great read about it. Pretty concise, as well: ...more

lestat wrote:

Sort of along the same lines , your head is older than your feet … unless you spend a lot of time hanging upside down .

I’d agree.

My feet still look eighteen. My head on the other hand…

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8/9/2021 5:36 AM

Rawly wrote:

Shouldn’t all of the explosions in Star Wars been silent ? Actually all of the outdoor scenes being silent might be too boring ...more

I always loved the sound of the seismic charges Jango Fett uses in "Attack of the Clones". A very non "movie explosiony" sound and it sounds cool. Basically a low bass thrum.

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8/9/2021 10:10 AM

Rawly wrote:

Shouldn’t all of the explosions in Star Wars been silent ? Actually all of the outdoor scenes being silent might be too boring ...more

it takes place in a galaxy far, far, way. The physics are different in their galaxy.

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8/9/2021 10:57 AM

GabeM wrote:

it takes place in a galaxy far, far, way. The physics are different in their galaxy.

Another example of sci-fi physics "just working"; when Gene Roddenberry would often be asked how the transporters worked in Star Trek, his answer was always, "very well, thank you."

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8/9/2021 1:09 PM

Rawly wrote:

Shouldn’t all of the explosions in Star Wars been silent ? Actually all of the outdoor scenes being silent might be too boring ...more

SEEMEFIRST wrote:

Why?
I'm asking because I don't know.
Radio waves move in space, why wouldn't sound waves?

Robgvx wrote:

Because sound is vibrations in the air I believe.

Correct. Sound requires a medium to propogate through, as it is merely waves of alternating high and low pressure. As there is zero pressure in space, there is also zero sound. Note that you can hear sound through solid objects, as well.

Imagine the noise we'd hear during the daytime if we could hear the sun!

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Braaapin' aint easy.

8/9/2021 2:25 PM

OK, thanks. Again, I never even thought about it before.

Yet another reason for mechanics to just, well, mechanic.

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Go for it! Don't let a little thing like fear, or common sense hold you back.

8/10/2021 10:30 AM

Rawly wrote:

Shouldn’t all of the explosions in Star Wars been silent ? Actually all of the outdoor scenes being silent might be too boring ...more

GabeM wrote:

it takes place in a galaxy far, far, way. The physics are different in their galaxy.

MotoTribology wrote:

Another example of sci-fi physics "just working"; when Gene Roddenberry would often be asked how the transporters worked in ...more

I recently read Project Hail Mary. Without giving too much of the story away, I liked how the laws of physics, as we know them, applied outside of our solar system.

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8/10/2021 10:40 AM

Oh I should check that out. I like the Martian and Artemis enough that I'll give any of Weir's works a try.

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I can do anything, I'm an expert.
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8/13/2021 3:12 PM

Falcon wrote:

Here's one that my friend, who is a rifleman, just won't believe:

A bullet, upon leaving the muzzle of a gun, drops to the ...more

While I believe that to be true, I also believe that it will take longer to "hit" the ground. If you fire a bullet level, as the bullet travels, the ground is dropping away from the bullet and the bullet has further to drop.
TM

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8/13/2021 3:21 PM

Falcon wrote:

Here's one that my friend, who is a rifleman, just won't believe:

A bullet, upon leaving the muzzle of a gun, drops to the ...more

ToolMaker wrote:

While I believe that to be true, I also believe that it will take longer to "hit" the ground. If you fire a bullet level, as ...more

Because of the Earth's curvature, you mean? That would be true as well, to a very small degree.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

8/13/2021 3:42 PM

Falcon wrote:

Here's one that my friend, who is a rifleman, just won't believe:

A bullet, upon leaving the muzzle of a gun, drops to the ...more

ToolMaker wrote:

While I believe that to be true, I also believe that it will take longer to "hit" the ground. If you fire a bullet level, as ...more

Eh, I don't think it would be appreciable unless you were shooting something that reached out there, even then...

The experiment is pretty hard to do. You would have to have a long, very flat spot.

One thing is a constant, gravity. You just can't fool it.

You could have wind variables, spin drift effects bullet flight, etc.

But gravity is damned regular.

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Go for it! Don't let a little thing like fear, or common sense hold you back.

8/14/2021 12:57 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/14/2021 1:07 AM

A bullet shot into the wind will fall faster due to extra drag and vice versa when shot with the wind which seems pretty obvious. More interestingly, a bullet out of a RH twist barrel into a crosswind moving from right to left will actually climb vertically to some degree because the spin on the bullet will walk its way up the wind. The opposite would be true of a RH twist bullet shot into a crosswind from the left to right.

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8/14/2021 8:13 AM

MotoTribology wrote:

Oh I should check that out. I like the Martian and Artemis enough that I'll give any of Weir's works a try.

I thought it was a good read. Fell somewhere between The Martian and Artemis for me.

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8/14/2021 8:31 AM

Hoseclamp wrote:

A bullet shot into the wind will fall faster due to extra drag and vice versa when shot with the wind which seems pretty ...more

When you say faster, do you actually mean in less distance on the x axis or faster by time?

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8/14/2021 8:37 AM

Hoseclamp wrote:

A bullet shot into the wind will fall faster due to extra drag and vice versa when shot with the wind which seems pretty ...more

APLMAN99 wrote:

When you say faster, do you actually mean in less distance on the x axis or faster by time?

Hmmmm... good question. When shot into the wind it will fall in less distance for sure due to the wind pushing back on it. Time till it drops? Im not sure.

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8/14/2021 8:39 AM

Maybe Falcon can explain the coriolis effect to us? I kinda get it, but would look like a fool if I tried to explain it in words.

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8/14/2021 8:51 AM

Hoseclamp wrote:

A bullet shot into the wind will fall faster due to extra drag and vice versa when shot with the wind which seems pretty ...more

APLMAN99 wrote:

When you say faster, do you actually mean in less distance on the x axis or faster by time?

Hoseclamp wrote:

Hmmmm... good question. When shot into the wind it will fall in less distance for sure due to the wind pushing back on it. ...more

Not sure either, but at first thought it would seem that if a bullet produced no lift, like a wing, then the time wouldn’t change. But there could be something else working on it I guess.

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8/15/2021 9:27 AM

Hoseclamp wrote:

Dang, got me thinking of more gun related physics.

Typically a heavier bullet for a given caliber will require more twist to ...more

For my physics III final I created a computational model of a bullet being fired to study "celebratory gun fire" after I had heard about this being an issue.. particularly over seas where civilians get their hands on military grade weapons and will fire them in the air in celebration (say at a wedding). Don't quote me, but the news story goes that one wedding in particular ended up with 22 (?) people killed or injured from people shooting bullets straight up in the air. Can't remember really.

The model would account for different bullet/weapon types and then would log their final energy state when they would impact. Everything but a 9mm meant almost certain death... even when fired directly straight above your head meaning the bullet at some height has a point of zero velocity... although with a 9mm you had a slight survival rate depending on location, elevation, etc.

Apparently stray bullets is actually a big problem... peoples homes/roofs get hit all the time. Might seem pretty trivial but I never really thought a bullet falling would have that much force.

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