OBD II device and ap

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12/13/2017 10:37 AM

Anybody have a recommendation for a setup for my android phone? I need real time fuel trim readings specifically. As well as the common stuff. I have a lean condition on both banks and have yet to find the problem. The scanner I borrowed just displays codes and monitor status.
Thanks in advance

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12/13/2017 1:10 PM

To find a lean condition, you'd almost need EGT's. How do you know it's lean?

If you are running a lot of boost, your ECU might not be compensating enough and is past it's range, or possibly the injectors can't flow enough.

Just out loud thinking Since you mentioned both banks.

Are you throwing a CEL?




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12/13/2017 1:17 PM
Edited Date/Time: 12/13/2017 2:14 PM

Oh and Mine reads anything that is available from the Plugin.

I can read Load, MAP, Intake Air Temp, TPS, Timing, GPH, everything the gauges show, I can't remember everything. I know it reads more info than what my rig sends to the plug.

I wish I could read EGT's with probes, but I'm stock. That really tells you if you are lean or not.

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12/13/2017 1:58 PM

I am using a BAFX Products 34t5 Bluetooth OBDII reader and the Torque Pro app in one of my Powerstroke diesel trucks. Works great. No OBDII device will read EGT's as you need to install a probe for that on any rig that I know of.

All in it cost -
$25 for OBDII reader
$5 for Torque Pro
$50 for used Samsung Tab3

Works as well or better than the two $700 Edge readers I have in my other trucks. What exactly it will do depends on what PIDs have been developed for your exact rig. The neat thing is guys are writing new ones all the time........

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12/13/2017 3:44 PM

Torque Pro. Get the Torque Scan add on too.

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12/13/2017 4:08 PM

Definitely Torque Pro. Whether it's gas or diesel, you didn't specify, it has a lot of info. Post up the numbers when you get it and I'll try to help

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RTFM & AYFV

12/13/2017 4:14 PM

If it's a ford download forscan, they got a mobile app but the pc version is where the cool stuff is at.

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12/13/2017 4:15 PM

Anyways lean on both banks is usually an intake manifold leak.

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12/13/2017 6:43 PM

colintrax wrote:

Anyways lean on both banks is usually an intake manifold leak.

I do have some indication of intake manifold issues but only on one side. It's a V6.
The codes are P0171 and P0174. What is odd is that it shows up twice for each code. 1 P0171, 2 P0174, 3 P0171, 4P0174.
Have been checking out Torque Pro.
Also 2 of my diagnostics will not complete. C and O.

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12/13/2017 7:36 PM

borg wrote:

I do have some indication of intake manifold issues but only on one side. It's a V6.
The codes are P0171 and P0174. What is odd is that it shows up twice for each code. 1 P0171, 2 P0174, 3 P0171, 4P0174.
Have been checking out Torque Pro.
Also 2 of my diagnostics will not complete. C and O.

Could be leaking at the top intake manifold where it feeds both, could be multiple leaks too.
You can build your own smoker if you have an air compressor. Just get a small paint can, fill it with mineral oil, screw a glow plug from a diesel into the lid (I used a ford 7.3 plug), hook that up to a battery charger set an amp or 2. Put a plug for the air compressor to breath into it, set the regulator at just a few psi so you don't blow out seals, and then whatever outlet you want. I siliconed a long piece of carb fuel line to the lid and it fits the intake manifold on most ford's where the brake booster is. But whatever works for you.

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12/13/2017 10:34 PM

TORQUE PRO

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Free Jeffro

12/13/2017 11:00 PM

colintrax wrote:

Anyways lean on both banks is usually an intake manifold leak.

borg wrote:

I do have some indication of intake manifold issues but only on one side. It's a V6.
The codes are P0171 and P0174. What is odd is that it shows up twice for each code. 1 P0171, 2 P0174, 3 P0171, 4P0174.
Have been checking out Torque Pro.
Also 2 of my diagnostics will not complete. C and O.

Can you check your fuel pressure? If you have a tester it is easy enough.
An intake manifold leak usually just doesnt happen.

The 2 bank deal, especially the P0174 odd code is strange.

If your fuel pressure is low, or drops under a load, it can create a lean condition, but usually it will stumble under a full throttle load. How long since new fuel filter if it doesnt have an in tank one only?

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12/14/2017 6:23 AM

Rhino wrote:

Can you check your fuel pressure? If you have a tester it is easy enough.
An intake manifold leak usually just doesnt happen.

The 2 bank deal, especially the P0174 odd code is strange.

If your fuel pressure is low, or drops under a load, it can create a lean condition, but usually it will stumble under a full throttle load. How long since new fuel filter if it doesnt have an in tank one only?

If I erase the codes, the CEL doesn't come back on for a week or so. It seems like it happens when I have been on the freeway at high speeds for several minutes. 80 mph or so. It's why I want to check the fuel trim readings. My guess is that they will be normal until high speed. If there is a filter, it's in the tank. Probably a pickup strainer. Can this P0171,174 issue be caused by a bad O2 sensor? That monitor does not complete it's cycle. It's been about 2 weeks of driving since reset. I even went through the recommended drive cycle and it still flashes. Also I cannot detect any performance issues, even at speed.

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12/14/2017 8:33 AM

borg wrote:

I do have some indication of intake manifold issues but only on one side. It's a V6.
The codes are P0171 and P0174. What is odd is that it shows up twice for each code. 1 P0171, 2 P0174, 3 P0171, 4P0174.
Have been checking out Torque Pro.
Also 2 of my diagnostics will not complete. C and O.

Rhino wrote:

Can you check your fuel pressure? If you have a tester it is easy enough.
An intake manifold leak usually just doesnt happen.

The 2 bank deal, especially the P0174 odd code is strange.

If your fuel pressure is low, or drops under a load, it can create a lean condition, but usually it will stumble under a full throttle load. How long since new fuel filter if it doesnt have an in tank one only?

borg wrote:

If I erase the codes, the CEL doesn't come back on for a week or so. It seems like it happens when I have been on the freeway at high speeds for several minutes. 80 mph or so. It's why I want to check the fuel trim readings. My guess is that they will be normal until high speed. If there is a filter, it's in the tank. Probably a pickup strainer. Can this P0171,174 issue be caused by a bad O2 sensor? That monitor does not complete it's cycle. It's been about 2 weeks of driving since reset. I even went through the recommended drive cycle and it still flashes. Also I cannot detect any performance issues, even at speed.

There should be a fuel pump sock in the tank, some cars even have 2. However you also have at least 1 more in line filter. You ought to go ahead and replace it you never have, they're only a couple bucks.

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12/14/2017 2:37 PM

Rhino wrote:

Can you check your fuel pressure? If you have a tester it is easy enough.
An intake manifold leak usually just doesnt happen.

The 2 bank deal, especially the P0174 odd code is strange.

If your fuel pressure is low, or drops under a load, it can create a lean condition, but usually it will stumble under a full throttle load. How long since new fuel filter if it doesnt have an in tank one only?

borg wrote:

If I erase the codes, the CEL doesn't come back on for a week or so. It seems like it happens when I have been on the freeway at high speeds for several minutes. 80 mph or so. It's why I want to check the fuel trim readings. My guess is that they will be normal until high speed. If there is a filter, it's in the tank. Probably a pickup strainer. Can this P0171,174 issue be caused by a bad O2 sensor? That monitor does not complete it's cycle. It's been about 2 weeks of driving since reset. I even went through the recommended drive cycle and it still flashes. Also I cannot detect any performance issues, even at speed.

colintrax wrote:

There should be a fuel pump sock in the tank, some cars even have 2. However you also have at least 1 more in line filter. You ought to go ahead and replace it you never have, they're only a couple bucks.

No inline filter. I know it sounds stupid but there isn't one. I'm guessing it's just an inlet strainer on the pump.

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12/14/2017 3:06 PM

borg wrote:

No inline filter. I know it sounds stupid but there isn't one. I'm guessing it's just an inlet strainer on the pump.

You sure? What vehicle is this?

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12/14/2017 4:07 PM

06 Tundra Std cab 4.0 V6 auto.

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12/14/2017 10:36 PM

borg wrote:

06 Tundra Std cab 4.0 V6 auto.

Well I'll be dammed, really aint an external fuel filter. Just the sock on the pump.
Well monitor the fuel pressure, if pressure is dropping it's time to yank the bed off.

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12/15/2017 2:19 PM

borg wrote:

06 Tundra Std cab 4.0 V6 auto.

colintrax wrote:

Well I'll be dammed, really aint an external fuel filter. Just the sock on the pump.
Well monitor the fuel pressure, if pressure is dropping it's time to yank the bed off.

The next thing I'm going to do is monitor the fuel trim data. It's simple to do. Fuel pressure is next although I'm not getting the 0087 code. I'm not sure if the ECM sends out actual pressure info. I would like to test that at speed.

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2/9/2018 5:57 AM

OK. No progress although an intake leak has been eliminated. Have not checked fuel pressure yet. F!@#$%^& Toyota does not provide a sensor for that or even a port to connect a gauge. I will probably have get a kit and cut in a test port.
Here is some freeze frame data:

Freeze frame information:
------------------
Fuel Status = 0 byte
Engine Load = 82.745 %
Engine Coolant Temperature = 188.6 °F
Fuel Trim Bank 1 Short Term = 3.906 %
Fuel Trim Bank 1 Long Term = 33.594 %
Fuel Trim Bank 2 Short Term = 5.469 %
Fuel Trim Bank 2 Long Term = 36.719 %
Engine RPM = 2,392.75 rpm
Speed (OBD) = 75.186 mph
Timing Advance = 15 °
Intake Air Temperature = 71.6 °F
Mass Air Flow Rate = 346.604 cfm
Throttle Position(Manifold) = 30.196 %
Run time since engine start = 471 s
O2 Sensor1 Equivalence Ratio = 1.011
O2 Sensor5 Equivalence Ratio = 1.01
Distance travelled since codes cleared = 526.301 miles
Barometric pressure (from vehicle) = 14.649 psi
O2 Sensor1 Equivalence Ratio(alternate) = 1.011
Catalyst Temperature (Bank 1,Sensor 1) = 1,371.02 °F
Catalyst Temperature (Bank 2,Sensor 1) = 1,371.02 °F
Catalyst Temperature (Bank 1,Sensor 2) = 1,179.5 °F
Catalyst Temperature (Bank 2,Sensor 2) = 1,179.5 °F
Voltage (Control Module) = 13.261 V
Engine Load(Absolute) = 45.49 %
Commanded Equivalence Ratio(lambda) = 0.948
Relative Throttle Position = 10.98 %
Absolute Throttle Position B = 65.49 %
Accelerator PedalPosition D = 31.765 %
Accelerator PedalPosition E = 47.451 %


End of report.

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2/9/2018 7:34 AM

colintrax wrote:

Anyways lean on both banks is usually an intake manifold leak.

x2. Leaks are the leading cause for a lean code on both banks together. That, low fuel pressure, or MAF is reading low.

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Nick
-2015 Grom grocery getter
-2011 Road King Classic
-2010 WR250X supermoto

2/9/2018 10:00 AM

If you have access to a torch and turn the oxygen on, with the engine running take the torch tip (NOT lit, OXYGEN only) around the intake, vacuum lines, throttle body and what not and see if it revs up while performing this procedure, if it does in a certain area you found your leak. Lean on both banks 9 out of 10 times is usually sucking air where it's not supposed to i.e. intake gaskets, vaccum line leaking, ect.ect.

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2/9/2018 10:28 AM

tomm55x wrote:

If you have access to a torch and turn the oxygen on, with the engine running take the torch tip (NOT lit, OXYGEN only) around the intake, vacuum lines, throttle body and what not and see if it revs up while performing this procedure, if it does in a certain area you found your leak. Lean on both banks 9 out of 10 times is usually sucking air where it's not supposed to i.e. intake gaskets, vaccum line leaking, ect.ect.

You could do the same with carb/brake cleaner.

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2/9/2018 10:35 AM

First I would compare coolant temp, intake air temp and ambient air temp after an overnight cold soak. One of these readings differing just a few degrees can wreak havoc on overall fuel trim. From that freeze frame data you posted that long term adaptive s are almost maxed out, meaning adding a lot of injector on time.

Typically long term adaptive numbers biggest factor is downstream O2 data. That O2 may be sending bad info, or it may not. The catalyst may not be doing its job of knocking down CO any longer. Also, bad wiring or connection can skew the numbers.

You didn’t mention any performance problems, and low fuel pressure would generally give that symptom. Low power, spitting, sputtering, etc. However, a fuel pressure test itself won’t do much for you unless it’s super low. A fuel quantity test would give you the information you need. Meaning you need to activate the fuel system and take a physical measurement of the amount of liquid fuel the pump is moving into a container in a specific amount of time.

I’m not intimately familiar with Toyota products but a quick look on google found a lot of guys with mass air flow sensor issues throwing your codes. Dumb question maybe, how’s your air filter? Installed or recharged a K&N recently? That oil can wreck a mass air flow sensor hot film wire.

Just some ideas. Good luck!

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2/9/2018 11:36 AM

eeazye wrote:

First I would compare coolant temp, intake air temp and ambient air temp after an overnight cold soak. One of these readings differing just a few degrees can wreak havoc on overall fuel trim. From that freeze frame data you posted that long term adaptive s are almost maxed out, meaning adding a lot of injector on time.

Typically long term adaptive numbers biggest factor is downstream O2 data. That O2 may be sending bad info, or it may not. The catalyst may not be doing its job of knocking down CO any longer. Also, bad wiring or connection can skew the numbers.

You didn’t mention any performance problems, and low fuel pressure would generally give that symptom. Low power, spitting, sputtering, etc. However, a fuel pressure test itself won’t do much for you unless it’s super low. A fuel quantity test would give you the information you need. Meaning you need to activate the fuel system and take a physical measurement of the amount of liquid fuel the pump is moving into a container in a specific amount of time.

I’m not intimately familiar with Toyota products but a quick look on google found a lot of guys with mass air flow sensor issues throwing your codes. Dumb question maybe, how’s your air filter? Installed or recharged a K&N recently? That oil can wreck a mass air flow sensor hot film wire.

Just some ideas. Good luck!

No performance issues. Also C and O monitors still incomplete after 500 plus miles. I ordered an MAF just to eliminate that. What's interesting is that this problem started a few weeks after a service. Oil change, tire rotation and "air filter" replacement. It's not an oil type filter but it sure is coincidental now that you mention it.

For some of the other responses: I do not have a vacuum leak anywhere. Smoke tested. The freeze frame data confirms that lean condition exists at speed and rpm's. A vacuum leak would not show that unless it was severe and in that case it would not idle.

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2/9/2018 2:05 PM

Look down inside your MAF. You will see two wires right next to each other. Spray them liberally with non cloronated brake cleaner or a can of electromotive parts cleaner, Blow dry with copmpressed air. Reinstall MAF. Go drive truck. Look at your long and short term fuel trims they will be correcting themselves. Its rare that you have to replace the maf on toyotas. They usually just need to be cleaned.

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2/9/2018 6:24 PM

Taotech wrote:

Look down inside your MAF. You will see two wires right next to each other. Spray them liberally with non cloronated brake cleaner or a can of electromotive parts cleaner, Blow dry with copmpressed air. Reinstall MAF. Go drive truck. Look at your long and short term fuel trims they will be correcting themselves. Its rare that you have to replace the maf on toyotas. They usually just need to be cleaned.

Where were you yesterday?
No biggy. $50 for the aftermarket MAF.
Thanks for the advice.

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2/10/2018 9:32 AM

Taotech wrote:

Look down inside your MAF. You will see two wires right next to each other. Spray them liberally with non cloronated brake cleaner or a can of electromotive parts cleaner, Blow dry with copmpressed air. Reinstall MAF. Go drive truck. Look at your long and short term fuel trims they will be correcting themselves. Its rare that you have to replace the maf on toyotas. They usually just need to be cleaned.

borg wrote:

Where were you yesterday?
No biggy. $50 for the aftermarket MAF.
Thanks for the advice.

Hold on to your original maf. The aftermarket one might give you problems, unless its Denso brand. The cheap aftermarket ones are usually good for 3 years max. If you have problems, clean your original and reinstall.

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2/11/2018 12:32 PM

Looks like it was the MAF. Put the new one in and the fuel trims went back to normal. Fingers crossed.

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2/11/2018 5:01 PM

Just an fyi, you can buy specific maf cleaner. I wouldn't use brake cleaner, those sensors are sensitive.
I clean the maf every air filter change.
Glad to see you got it fixed

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