Marathon Wimbledon match

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6/23/2010 3:09 PM

Still not finished. This should put any number of stats into the Hall of Untouchable. ( ex. They are both closing in on 100 aces each. )


Marathon Wimbledon match suspended at 59-59 in 5th

WIMBLEDON, England (AP)—The longest match in tennis history was suspended because of darkness at 59-59 in the fifth set at Wimbledon on Wednesday night.

The first-round match between 23rd-seeded John Isner of Tampa, Fla., and qualifier Nicolas Mahut of France already had been suspended because of fading light Tuesday night after the fourth set.

They have been playing each other for a total of exactly 10 hours—7 hours, 6 minutes in the fifth set alone, enough to break the full-match record of 6:33, set at the 2004 French Open.

Never before in the history of Wimbledon, which first was contested in 1877, had any match—singles or doubles, men or women—lasted more than 112 games, a mark set in 1969. Isner and Mahut played more games than that in their fifth set, and still did not determine a victor, although the American came close: He had four match points—four chances to end things with one more point—but Mahut saved each one.

Even a courtside electronic scoreboard couldn’t keep up, getting stuck at 47-47 when the score really had risen to 48-48, then eventually going dark entirely.

Yet the pair played on. All the numbers were truly astounding: They played 881 points, 612 in the fifth set. Isner hit 98 aces, Mahut 95—both eclipsing the previous high for a match at any tournament, 78.

And this cannot be emphasized enough: They are not finished. No one won. The match will continue, stretching into a third day.

Shortly after 9 p.m., Mahut and Isner approached the net to discuss with a tournament official whether to keep going Wednesday.

“I want to play,” Mahut said, “but I can’t see.”

Fans began chanting, “We want more! We want more!” then rose to salute the players with a standing ovation.

In a courtside TV interview, Isner said: “Nothing like this will ever happen again. Ever.”



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6/23/2010 4:26 PM

I watched that for hours! Unreal, I'm not sure what time it starts tomorrow though. Those guys are in great condition.

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6/23/2010 7:20 PM

Race, i almost emailed you this afternoon to see if you were watching this match (seems you and i are about the only members that really follow tennis here), crazy shit! The list of records they broke is insane. I guess now it is all going to come down to who's body recovers better overnight before they are back on the court tomorrow morning.

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-OC
"Feed The Bull"
Twitter: @ocscottie | Facebook

6/23/2010 7:40 PM

Wow 10 hrs thats crazy, me and the mrs used to play tennis, i always thought it was a great aerobic exercise, and good cross training for mx, i still have 2 Prince rackets and the mrs has 2 Wilsons, she broke her ankle about 10 yrs ago, falling down 3 steps and we kinda gave it up since then, we have gone a few times since, but not for long, and now since we moved to the country its about 10-11 miles to the closest courts.

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6/23/2010 11:00 PM

ocscottie wrote:

Race, i almost emailed you this afternoon to see if you were watching this match (seems you and i are about the only members that really follow tennis here), crazy shit! The list of records they broke is insane. I guess now it is all going to come down to who's body recovers better overnight before they are back on the court tomorrow morning.

Yeah, that is a crazy moment in sports. Two competitors that are seemingly "stuck" within the scoring of the game and can't quite finish each other off. Talk about a test of wills!

Isner is the far better player but the French guy has been playing huge. And Isner at times looks like he's out on his feet ... but just clocks his forehand for winners.

After all this, I hope one of them doesn't just blitz the other in the first minute tomorrow.

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6/23/2010 11:13 PM

How about Fed? he sure is struggling, in his younger days it wouldnt feel like such a big deal as he would just get stronger as the matches go by. He is getting a little older though, going to be interesting if he can still perform his magic on the grass in the later rounds.

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-OC
"Feed The Bull"
Twitter: @ocscottie | Facebook

6/24/2010 12:18 AM

ocscottie wrote:

Race, i almost emailed you this afternoon to see if you were watching this match (seems you and i are about the only members that really follow tennis here), crazy shit! The list of records they broke is insane. I guess now it is all going to come down to who's body recovers better overnight before they are back on the court tomorrow morning.

I'm a tennis follower! Awesome sport..

This is a crazy match hey? I haven't actually watched any of it but I'm definately going to watch the continuation today.. Absolutely unbelievable that they have been so even over that time frame and neither has broken mentally, it is a record that will never be broken.

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6/24/2010 4:28 AM

Isner is actually from Greensboro, NC. Take that bitches!wink


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The Josie Wales of Vitalmx

6/24/2010 4:40 AM

Broadcast just started on ESPN2 and all the talk is about that match, they just interviewed Mahut and he seemed to be in pretty damn good shape for what he has been through.

To try and put it in perspective, their 5th set alone is longer than any match ever played at Wimbledon, wild stuff.

They said Andy Roddick sent over his personal masseuse to Isner last night and brought in food for his whole camp, class act.

-and today is the 1st time the Queen has attended Wimbledon in over 30 something years.

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-OC
"Feed The Bull"
Twitter: @ocscottie | Facebook

6/24/2010 9:01 AM

Isner ... 70 - 68 in the 5th!!

Unbelievable.

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6/24/2010 9:54 AM


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LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 24: John Isner of USA celebrates winning on the third day of his first round match against Nicolas Mahut of France on Day Four of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on June 24, 2010 in London, England. The match is the longest in Grand Slam history. (Photo by Suzanne Plunkett-Pool/Getty Images)


And you KNOW ... he did not want to go down in history as having lost the longest match ever ... to an elephant driver.


Not that there's anything wrong with mahouts.

Just sayin'




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6/24/2010 9:58 AM
Edited Date/Time: 6/24/2010 9:58 AM

Elephant driver? Is that like a Big Bertha?

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6/24/2010 3:25 PM

After a match like that, wonder if hes got any thing left for his next match?

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6/25/2010 2:09 AM

oldschoolmxr203 wrote:

After a match like that, wonder if hes got any thing left for his next match?

I would not be suprised to see him lose in 3 sets, however after winning a match like that I hope he goes on deeper into the tournament!

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6/25/2010 8:40 PM

oldschoolmxr203 wrote:

After a match like that, wonder if hes got any thing left for his next match?

jackson222 wrote:

I would not be suprised to see him lose in 3 sets, however after winning a match like that I hope he goes on deeper into the tournament!

Looks like he was out of gas. I think that he lost on purpose just so that he could hang out with the dozens of women that are probably on his jock rigtht now after that match.wink

Go NC!!


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The Josie Wales of Vitalmx

6/25/2010 9:44 PM

Long and short of it: Tired Isner loses quickly


By HOWARD FENDRICH, AP Tennis Writer

WIMBLEDON, England (AP)—John Isner dragged his weary, 6-foot-9 body back out to play in Wimbledon’s second round a day after finally winning the longest match in tennis history, an 11-hour, 5-minute affair that ended 70-68 in the fifth set. Not surprisingly, every movement was a chore.

Also not surprisingly, the 23rd-seeded Isner lost 6-0, 6-3, 6-2 to 49th-ranked Thiemo de Bakker of the Netherlands in 74 minutes Friday—the shortest men’s match at the All England Club so far this year.

“Right now, I just can’t wait to sit down on a couch for a prolonged period of time,” Isner said. “I spent a lot of hours on my feet the last three, four days. I just need to sit back and rest and let my body recoup.”

Bending his knees, chasing his opponent’s shots, even grabbing a purple towel to wipe away perspiration as the temperature approached 80 degrees under the noontime sun—all required too much energy and effort after what Isner went through in his previous match against Nicolas Mahut. That 183-game “ordeal,” to use Isner’s term, began Tuesday, was suspended twice because of darkness, and ended Thursday afternoon.

“Didn’t really have a chance,” he said.

Isner’s right shoulder, the one that managed to pound a record 112 aces against Mahut, felt “kind of dead” and produced zero aces against de Bakker. Isner’s neck was so stiff, he couldn’t tilt his head back or turn it to the side. The skin was worn away on the little toe on his left foot, creating a painful blister.

“He just didn’t have enough time to get his body right. … He’s one tired boy,” said Isner’s coach, Craig Boynton. “Your body’s like, ‘Hey, what are you doing to me here?”’

The American probably would not have won Friday, no matter who was on the other side of the net, and no matter what time he was due on court.

That was clear from the very first game, which began at about 12:15 p.m.; Isner-Mahut ended at 4:48 p.m. on Thursday.

Friday’s match began with Isner’s serve getting broken—something that did not happen over the last 84 games he served against Mahut. A pattern was established, and the first set was done in 16 minutes. At the ensuing changeover, Isner plopped down on court and—while a ballkid stood nearby, providing shade with an umbrella—received a neck massage from a trainer, which seemed to help somewhat.

“The first set, he didn’t try at all,” de Bakker said. “And then in the second set, he was trying a little bit better.”

Against Mahut, Isner averaged 123 mph on first serves, reaching a high of 143 mph. Against de Bakker, his average was 115 mph, his fastest 130 mph, speeds that, for Isner, are tantamount to “lobbing it in,” in Boynton’s words.

“I wouldn’t have bet a lot of money on him today,” said Isner’s mother, Karen, “but he did his best, and that’s what it’s about.”

Boynton tried to offer encouragement from the stands, shouting, “Here we go, kid! Good spot here!” or “You can do it, Johnny!” But Isner’s body language indicated otherwise. He winced after lengthy baseline exchanges, puffed his cheeks and exhaled after missed chances, slapped his right thigh with his racket after missing one service return, and often paused to stretch his back or put his hands on his knees while sucking wind.

“It was brutal,” Isner said. “I mean, I’ve never been this exhausted before.”

Still, he never considered quitting against de Bakker.

Later Friday, though, Isner and partner Sam Querrey pulled out of their first-round doubles match, which originally was to be played Wednesday but was postponed twice.

As he prepared to leave the All England Club, Isner said he hadn’t yet had a chance to really reflect on the impact his record-breaking first-round match would have down the road, on the court or off. His agent, Sam Duvall, already has spoken to potential new sponsors and, while not offering any details, added, “Suffice to say, we’ve been very busy.”

De Bakker, meanwhile, reached Wimbledon’s third round for the first time and was pleased to have a short day’s work. He played the second-most games in this year’s first round, 74, winning in a 16-14 fifth set.

“After my first match, I was pretty tired, as well,” de Bakker said, then broke into a wide smile before adding: “But 16-14 is nothing anymore.”

He considered himself “lucky” to be facing someone who endured 70-68. Plus, de Bakker’s match ended Wednesday, allowing him much more recovery time than Isner. Because of the neck problem, which developed Thursday evening, Isner did not hit any balls Friday morning to prepare, instead spending time on a trainer’s table for treatment.

“I don’t want to go out, second round of a Slam. I’m in these tournaments to go deep and potentially win them,” said Isner, who led Georgia to the 2007 NCAA tennis championship. “But this is a little bit different. If I went four sets in my first match and lost today, I’d be really disappointed.”

Isner’s next tournament, in Atlanta, doesn’t begin until July 19, so he will enjoy some well-deserved time off.

First, he’ll head home to Tampa, Fla., then might visit family in Greensboro, N.C. Otherwise, he has no set plans—perhaps some fishing, watching World Cup games on television, hanging out with buddies.

He does, however, know what he won’t be doing at all for the next week or so: picking up a racket.

“I’ll do whatever,” Isner said. “Just anything away from the tennis court.”

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6/26/2010 7:59 AM

The pair of them could be geniuses and set the whole thing up.

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