Is 18 too young for college?

Related:
Create New Tag

9/28/2017 12:04 AM

Was thinking about this out of nowhere. My daughter is only 7 but I was thinking about those college days and first day of college and how hard it will be to drop her off and say good bye. I know it was hard for me when my parents dropped me off 25 years ago at ga southern.

It just ended up being one big party at our dorm and every night and of course the booze and drugs just got bigger from there. It's easy for a kid to spiral.
I saw people from my hometown dropping like flies from ga southern for all types of reasons. Relationships or mental or overwhelming or not going class or drugs and alcohol which got the best of me my 3rd year.

I would say out of the 50 or so from my hometown that went there only 10 lasted.

Which begs the question is 18 just too young to be off on your own that far away from parents? Are kids just still too immature at that age?
I'm almost wondering if staying at home a few more years and going to a local college might be better idea until maturity hits a little more.

|

9/28/2017 4:07 AM

Our youngest guy just started at University a month ago - he just turned 18 a week ago. Sort of a different situation - it's only 2.5 hours away, and in the same town my inlaws are in. And his older brother & sister are there also. So not exactly like shipping across the country all by your lonesome. But he is in residence, so on his own that way.

Frosh week had its moments that I won't get into but think he's settled it down and gotten himself down to a grind. There are a lot of mature 17 year olds out there, and a lot of very immature 30 year olds - so it likely mostly comes down to their upbringing & parenting they've had. Most universities here have been paying more attention lately to this frosh stuff & the alcohol aspect, and getting supports & guidances in place. But it's still there - no getting around it.

|

HAF

9/28/2017 4:20 AM

I never went to college ,my wife has a master's in higher education . I've heard some real good stories . She is the assistant director of admissions of a state university . She said it's nothing for possible new students to sit down with her and bring their parents with them . From her point of view ,those are the kids that have had someone steering them through life ,they have no idea what to do and as soon as they are turned lose ,they go bananas. Another possible thought is the students arnt the ones paying to continue their education so they either don't realize what's at stake or just don't care. We were all wild at one point ,it's just how much of that wild side effects our future is what needs to be checked.

|

9/28/2017 4:57 AM

18 was too young for me. I wanted to party more than study which didn't work out very well. I wish someone had smacked across the head with a 2x4 and sent me off to trade school or pulled me into an apprenticeship somewhere. I would have been far better off than spending 10yrs working whatever job I could get and just scraping by until I had enough experience to land a good paying, career type position.

|

9/28/2017 6:03 AM

Depends on the kid and the school and the luck of the draw.

|

9/28/2017 6:05 AM

I think 18 is fine for the majority. Was there wasted time and poor judgement on my behalf during the first year? Sure, and I could also say the same thing about high school and even some years after college. I had great parenting, but for some reason I used to prioritize fun over fill in the blank.

Maturity comes at different times for people.

|

9/28/2017 6:39 AM

I know what kept me out of trouble in college was having hobbies that didn't necessarily revolve around drinking.

I also had 3 jobs and was paying for my own way through college so I knew how hard the money was to come by while going to college.

IMO the high school system in the country needs to be revised to drop standardized testing and really give students an education on adult world problems. Personal finance classes would be a good start.

|

9/28/2017 6:40 AM

I will say no, it's your choice if you chose to booze it up and party. I know a ton of you guys are into to whole popping pills and weed and that's your choice. But not everyone wants to be like the "cool" kids.

BTW I have a kid who is a freshmen in college. He ain't partying and is there to further his education. I can follow his instagram story and see what he's doing pretty much 24/7.

|

Only 2 things that money can't buy, thats true love and homegrown tomatoes.

9/28/2017 6:42 AM

Everyone's different.

My kids started full time at 16, but it was our local CC so they weren't juggling the whole "living on my own for the first time" thing. That definitely helped. Academically they were easily ready by 16, socially might have been different.

|

9/28/2017 7:07 AM
Edited Date/Time: 9/28/2017 7:08 AM

I would argue I was too young to leave home and be responsible to focus on my education. When I went away to school (in a "big city" Boston) I was focusing on too much: Engineering classes, working, partying, racing pro mountain bikes, and girls. That did not go well sometimes, I almost got kicked out after my first semester because my grades were horrible.

Especially if you're used to floating by in High School with minimal "extra" effort, going away to a university can be a huge wake up call.

|

9/28/2017 7:12 AM

Depends how you're raised. If your parents carried you, paid for everything, let you get away with anything etc then you're going to have a hard time keeping on a straight path. Obviously there are outliers as with anything.

I worked 2 hours after school from 11 years old to about 14. After turning 14 I worked from 3pm when I got out of school til 8pm every day. My parents didn't MAKE me work, but they told me if I wanted a vehicle, cell phone, dirt bikes, etc then I was working. My parents paid for any and all necessities without question. But they taught me responsibility. That's the thing 18 year old kids lack going into college. A lot of them never even had an after school part time job and their parents think they can take care of themselves? Crazy. Teach your kids responsibility and money management at a young age so they're prepared for the real world.

|

9/28/2017 7:19 AM

Depends on the parenting, the college, the kid, and his/her peer group.

This was my boy and his friends his freshman year.

Photo

Photo

|

"We don't rent pigs."

9/28/2017 7:24 AM
Edited Date/Time: 9/28/2017 11:12 AM

Being 20 and in college (enrolled when I was 18), I think moving away from your parents for college and enjoying freedom at 18 is just what kids need. Some will handle it better than others, and some won't make it to the end, but it's an experience that, well, everyone should get to have. You learn to take care of yourself and you really figure out, and I know this sounds cliche, who you are.

If you hold your kids back until their 20 and then send them to college, they're still gonna do the same stuff they were gonna do when they were 18, except now they're 20.

|

Contact Me

Instagram (@gdawson243)

Snapchat: gdawson2

9/28/2017 7:35 AM

Depends on how mentally mature this particular 18ry old is. I took a lot of Jr. College classes during high school so I was somewhat ahead of my freshman class in college. My folks had a college fund saved and told me that it would get me through 4 years, after that, I would have to make my own way. End of first semester I added all expenses and realized just how much it costs. I went year round, got part time jobs to pay for summer classes and graduated in four years (1987). My grades were not outstanding, 2.75gpa, but it was a great life experience and a whole lot of fun. College taught me to get the hell up and work for a goal, think critically, and look deeper into what is really going on.

It's all priorities. School, work, party, there's plenty of time for all. Being exposed to sex, booze and drugs...well, that's going to happen, probably more so in high school, and how a person is raised determines how they deal with it.

College weeds out the lazy. You gotta want it.

|

9/28/2017 7:47 AM

GD2 wrote:

Being 20 and in college (enrolled when I was 18), I think moving away from your parents for college and enjoying freedom at 18 is just what kids need. Some will handle it better than others, and some won't make it to the end, but it's an experience that, well, everyone should get to have. You learn to take care of yourself and you really figure out, and I know this sounds cliche, who you are.

If you hold your kids back until their 20 and then send them to college, they're still gonna do the same stuff they were gonna do when they were 18, except now they're 20.

GD2, How's San Marcos now a days? I'm an Alum from "87 and haven't been back down there since '07. Man, things had changed. Are Grins, Palmer House, Green Parrot, and Cheatham St. still there? There was a bar out RR12 near the backbone, Devil's Backbone Tavern, where the old folk locals used to go for pool, shuffle board, and .75 cent can beer. My room mate and I could go there and drink beer all night for free by beating everyone in shuffleboard. Good times!

|

9/28/2017 12:29 PM

JAFO92 wrote:

Depends on the parenting, the college, the kid, and his/her peer group.

This was my boy and his friends his freshman year.

Photo

Photo

X2, and thinking college is bad if you are only 18, lol.

|

9/28/2017 3:30 PM

Im 17 and about to be applying to colleges. (I'll graduate high school when im 17 as well, finishing my senior year now.) I think the younger you are, the more colleges will appreciate you'r academic knowledge, but I know college can be a scary place for younger kids. Just recently iv'e had most my friends turn to the stupid party life, but I can't do that. I hate being around stupid people. My dad's views pretty much exactly rubbed off on me. It's pretty sad to see the people I loved to be around just throw their chances of success away. But I know the best thing to do is keep your nose clean and stay out of trouble. Getting good grades isn't a big deal if you actually TRY and pay attention, school and all the college courses have gotten pretty stressful, but I take my dad's advice and look at the big picture. Get good grades, get accepted into a good college, study hard and graduate with a good skill set, find a good paying job and make bank, spend a small time of your life working to acquire tons of money, retire at a younger age and ride dirt bikes all day. Thats what keeps me going haha. Im just glad my dad took the time to make sure I was taking school seriously. Its the path to success.

|

Hope for the best, Prepare for the worst.

9/28/2017 6:02 PM
Edited Date/Time: 9/28/2017 6:03 PM

Maybe I'm a little old fashion but I think college is a great place to discover who you are, explore ideas, and experience new types of people and situations. Probably because I did the majority of my partying in junior high, the social college scene wasn't my thing. With that said, If a kid can't party and get good grades in college then college probably not the right path for them.

|

9/28/2017 6:55 PM

Because I thought I wanted to be a motorcycle mechanic after I graduated high school, I did that for 3 years before deciding I only liked working on my own bikes, and I did not want to make a career of being an MC Mechanic. So I entered university at 21 and soon turned 22, a bit older than most of the freshman. That extra age you would think would add wisdom to the college freshman experience. Not so much at the start. I can honestly say in my first two weeks at MSU I probably consumed more booze than I had in my entire live up to that point.

But I survived and buckled down and made it thru. And I made many life long friends in college. My college years were great.

|

“Adhering to 1970’s Standards of Political Correctness”

9/28/2017 7:04 PM

Well OP you have 11 years to prepare her but, really? Is this stuff keeping you up at night? Enjoy the time you have with your daughter knowing at some time you will have to send her on her own. How she does in college is mostly on what happens between now and then. FWIW, your challenge about letting go will probably start with puberty. She will hit a point where she will want to let go before you do.

|

The older I get, the faster I was.

9/28/2017 8:53 PM

GD2 wrote:

Being 20 and in college (enrolled when I was 18), I think moving away from your parents for college and enjoying freedom at 18 is just what kids need. Some will handle it better than others, and some won't make it to the end, but it's an experience that, well, everyone should get to have. You learn to take care of yourself and you really figure out, and I know this sounds cliche, who you are.

If you hold your kids back until their 20 and then send them to college, they're still gonna do the same stuff they were gonna do when they were 18, except now they're 20.

BMR179 wrote:

GD2, How's San Marcos now a days? I'm an Alum from "87 and haven't been back down there since '07. Man, things had changed. Are Grins, Palmer House, Green Parrot, and Cheatham St. still there? There was a bar out RR12 near the backbone, Devil's Backbone Tavern, where the old folk locals used to go for pool, shuffle board, and .75 cent can beer. My room mate and I could go there and drink beer all night for free by beating everyone in shuffleboard. Good times!

I'd imagine it's about the same as when you were here last. The party scene is pretty much dead except for pretty low-key ones. The police department shuts them down within an hour or two these days–not that they're great to begin with... I've never thought of packing a couple hundred people into a small house and passing around bottles of cheap alcohol as a good time.

There is a LOT of construction happening around campus. Aquarena was shut down for pretty much the entire summer, and now there are various other parts of campus where the roads are shut down.

I know Grins and Palmer House are still around, but not sure about the others. Our "fun" days are usually spent playing disc golf or just hitting different places around town or going to the movies. Maybe that'll change a bit after we hit drinking age in a couple of months.

|

Contact Me

Instagram (@gdawson243)

Snapchat: gdawson2

9/28/2017 10:09 PM
Edited Date/Time: 9/28/2017 10:11 PM

I wouldn't say its too young- but the pitfalls are many. It is really one of the tests of college. I saw a lot of alcohol casualties...it is really at that point where the serious get serious, and the others party their asses off for a year until it all comes crashing down.
I did community college before going to a 4-year college and worked my ass off all through school, washing dishes, cooking in restaurants and waiting tables. I partied, but the sheer workload of getting a degree while working all the time sort of kept me on track. Shit, I learned as much about the professional world working in restaurants than I did in class. As well as how to interact with a team, under pressure etc. It's better if kids work in school-- or else there are too many distractions.

|

It's impossible for a corporation or government to love you or care about you.

9/28/2017 10:38 PM

Squidward wrote:

Im 17 and about to be applying to colleges. (I'll graduate high school when im 17 as well, finishing my senior year now.) I think the younger you are, the more colleges will appreciate you'r academic knowledge, but I know college can be a scary place for younger kids. Just recently iv'e had most my friends turn to the stupid party life, but I can't do that. I hate being around stupid people. My dad's views pretty much exactly rubbed off on me. It's pretty sad to see the people I loved to be around just throw their chances of success away. But I know the best thing to do is keep your nose clean and stay out of trouble. Getting good grades isn't a big deal if you actually TRY and pay attention, school and all the college courses have gotten pretty stressful, but I take my dad's advice and look at the big picture. Get good grades, get accepted into a good college, study hard and graduate with a good skill set, find a good paying job and make bank, spend a small time of your life working to acquire tons of money, retire at a younger age and ride dirt bikes all day. Thats what keeps me going haha. Im just glad my dad took the time to make sure I was taking school seriously. Its the path to success.

My oldest son graduated at 17, oldest daughter missed it by a few weeks. I was younger than either of them, turned 18 just a few weeks before I began college.

Running Start (college instead of HS for the last 2 years) was a huge help for them. For my daughter, she graduated with her bachelor's degree in 3 years. Could have been sooner but changing a major slows down the plans.

My son ended up going to a pretty decent school after HS (ranked 11th in the world overall) and literally dominated. He ended up doing all 4 years but the last 2 were mostly grad level courses

What they got out of doing the CC thing was learning to handle their own shit. The CC instructors wouldn't even talk to parents about how students were doing etc. The students had to step up and be responsible, like an adult.

It worked pretty well for them.

|

9/28/2017 10:57 PM

APLMAN99 wrote:

My oldest son graduated at 17, oldest daughter missed it by a few weeks. I was younger than either of them, turned 18 just a few weeks before I began college.

Running Start (college instead of HS for the last 2 years) was a huge help for them. For my daughter, she graduated with her bachelor's degree in 3 years. Could have been sooner but changing a major slows down the plans.

My son ended up going to a pretty decent school after HS (ranked 11th in the world overall) and literally dominated. He ended up doing all 4 years but the last 2 were mostly grad level courses

What they got out of doing the CC thing was learning to handle their own shit. The CC instructors wouldn't even talk to parents about how students were doing etc. The students had to step up and be responsible, like an adult.

It worked pretty well for them.

Good for them man, and same for you haha. I've been stressing college a lot, I want to get in to a fairly prestigious place so I can pretty much have life by the balls. I figured taking the college courses in high school would be a huge help (I'm not the greatest at calculus or any of that, but getting by lol) But It seems obvious it would put you ahead a good amount when college rolls around. I was planning on the medical field, but man you pay if its a nice college your looking into. I think Johns Hopkins was 56k a year for the school of medicine. And then your looking at 1 year pre-med, + 4 years med (280k) so you really need some type of scholarship/ financial aid. But I got a letter from MIT so now i'm wondering if I should drop the medical idea and switch to engineering lol. All I can do is work my ass off and pray. All i'm concerned about is whether or not i can get in. I have no problem putting in the effort, and staying out of trouble in college. Moneys just the biggest factor. So it makes having good grades, volunteer work, extra curricular, etc. that much more important. But hey, i'm sure it'll work out in the end. Congrats on your kids and sounds like you taught em well haha.

|

Hope for the best, Prepare for the worst.

9/29/2017 6:19 AM

Squidward wrote:

Im 17 and about to be applying to colleges. (I'll graduate high school when im 17 as well, finishing my senior year now.) I think the younger you are, the more colleges will appreciate you'r academic knowledge, but I know college can be a scary place for younger kids. Just recently iv'e had most my friends turn to the stupid party life, but I can't do that. I hate being around stupid people. My dad's views pretty much exactly rubbed off on me. It's pretty sad to see the people I loved to be around just throw their chances of success away. But I know the best thing to do is keep your nose clean and stay out of trouble. Getting good grades isn't a big deal if you actually TRY and pay attention, school and all the college courses have gotten pretty stressful, but I take my dad's advice and look at the big picture. Get good grades, get accepted into a good college, study hard and graduate with a good skill set, find a good paying job and make bank, spend a small time of your life working to acquire tons of money, retire at a younger age and ride dirt bikes all day. Thats what keeps me going haha. Im just glad my dad took the time to make sure I was taking school seriously. Its the path to success.

APLMAN99 wrote:

My oldest son graduated at 17, oldest daughter missed it by a few weeks. I was younger than either of them, turned 18 just a few weeks before I began college.

Running Start (college instead of HS for the last 2 years) was a huge help for them. For my daughter, she graduated with her bachelor's degree in 3 years. Could have been sooner but changing a major slows down the plans.

My son ended up going to a pretty decent school after HS (ranked 11th in the world overall) and literally dominated. He ended up doing all 4 years but the last 2 were mostly grad level courses

What they got out of doing the CC thing was learning to handle their own shit. The CC instructors wouldn't even talk to parents about how students were doing etc. The students had to step up and be responsible, like an adult.

It worked pretty well for them.

Squidward wrote:

Good for them man, and same for you haha. I've been stressing college a lot, I want to get in to a fairly prestigious place so I can pretty much have life by the balls. I figured taking the college courses in high school would be a huge help (I'm not the greatest at calculus or any of that, but getting by lol) But It seems obvious it would put you ahead a good amount when college rolls around. I was planning on the medical field, but man you pay if its a nice college your looking into. I think Johns Hopkins was 56k a year for the school of medicine. And then your looking at 1 year pre-med, + 4 years med (280k) so you really need some type of scholarship/ financial aid. But I got a letter from MIT so now i'm wondering if I should drop the medical idea and switch to engineering lol. All I can do is work my ass off and pray. All i'm concerned about is whether or not i can get in. I have no problem putting in the effort, and staying out of trouble in college. Moneys just the biggest factor. So it makes having good grades, volunteer work, extra curricular, etc. that much more important. But hey, i'm sure it'll work out in the end. Congrats on your kids and sounds like you taught em well haha.

If you have the grades and aptitude to get into somewhere like MIT or John Hopkins then you should be able to get significant scholarships or full rides to very good schools that aren't as "prestigious". No reason to pay for something that you can get free somewhere else.

|

9/29/2017 6:38 AM

gabrielito wrote:

Maybe I'm a little old fashion but I think college is a great place to discover who you are, explore ideas, and experience new types of people and situations. Probably because I did the majority of my partying in junior high, the social college scene wasn't my thing. With that said, If a kid can't party and get good grades in college then college probably not the right path for them.

Well said. It's a hell of a learning experience being with thousands of other people coming from all different walks of life. Very eye opening to see how other people were raised (it was obvious when one of your roommates came from a household where mom did everything!).

I made it through a pretty difficult engineering program and still made time for a social life. Seeing kids these days piss away their parents money failing out of a mediocre degree is very disturbing. You're 18. You're an adult. Act like it. It's not that hard.

|

9/29/2017 7:19 AM

Squidward wrote:

Good for them man, and same for you haha. I've been stressing college a lot, I want to get in to a fairly prestigious place so I can pretty much have life by the balls. I figured taking the college courses in high school would be a huge help (I'm not the greatest at calculus or any of that, but getting by lol) But It seems obvious it would put you ahead a good amount when college rolls around. I was planning on the medical field, but man you pay if its a nice college your looking into. I think Johns Hopkins was 56k a year for the school of medicine. And then your looking at 1 year pre-med, + 4 years med (280k) so you really need some type of scholarship/ financial aid. But I got a letter from MIT so now i'm wondering if I should drop the medical idea and switch to engineering lol. All I can do is work my ass off and pray. All i'm concerned about is whether or not i can get in. I have no problem putting in the effort, and staying out of trouble in college. Moneys just the biggest factor. So it makes having good grades, volunteer work, extra curricular, etc. that much more important. But hey, i'm sure it'll work out in the end. Congrats on your kids and sounds like you taught em well haha.

My random advice, think really hard about what you want to be doing for decades after school. Don't go with one over the other based on money, being happy goes a long way. I know someone who just started at approximately $400,000 salary as a doctor but she also has thousands in debt to pay back obviously. You aren't going to see that starting salary with engineering but you can still do really well for yourself with just a BS and then use a potential employer to go back and get your masters or MBA if you want. Good luck!

|

9/29/2017 8:59 AM

Squidward wrote:

Good for them man, and same for you haha. I've been stressing college a lot, I want to get in to a fairly prestigious place so I can pretty much have life by the balls. I figured taking the college courses in high school would be a huge help (I'm not the greatest at calculus or any of that, but getting by lol) But It seems obvious it would put you ahead a good amount when college rolls around. I was planning on the medical field, but man you pay if its a nice college your looking into. I think Johns Hopkins was 56k a year for the school of medicine. And then your looking at 1 year pre-med, + 4 years med (280k) so you really need some type of scholarship/ financial aid. But I got a letter from MIT so now i'm wondering if I should drop the medical idea and switch to engineering lol. All I can do is work my ass off and pray. All i'm concerned about is whether or not i can get in. I have no problem putting in the effort, and staying out of trouble in college. Moneys just the biggest factor. So it makes having good grades, volunteer work, extra curricular, etc. that much more important. But hey, i'm sure it'll work out in the end. Congrats on your kids and sounds like you taught em well haha.

I may be misunderstanding something, but are you thinking 5 years total to get your MD/DO? That's just about Doogie Howser stuff right there. I'd plan on 4 years undergrad "premed" before med school in all but the rarest of cases and especially for a legit, we'll respected med school.

Unless your career plan requires grad school, I wouldn't limit your school choices to "prestigious" schools. I'd definitely consider local CCs and regional universities that are located in places that will be enjoyable to be in and have good programs.

I've had 3 kids in college now and they've been enrolled at a wide variety of schools. Community college, regional universities, private university, and large pubic research university. All of them so far have had some very good learning opportunities whether they were considered "prestigious" or not.

If you're undecided on a major, I'd definitely consider doing your exploring at a lower cost school where you're more likely to be able to ask questions, rather than being the 550th student in a "101 Intro to XYZ" class.

|

9/29/2017 9:22 AM

Yes I think 18 is too young to sign up for possibly 50k worth of debt. I'm so glad I didn't fall for that trap.

|

Instagram: vanillaice782
Amateur helmet painter

9/29/2017 12:11 PM

seth505 wrote:

My random advice, think really hard about what you want to be doing for decades after school. Don't go with one over the other based on money, being happy goes a long way. I know someone who just started at approximately $400,000 salary as a doctor but she also has thousands in debt to pay back obviously. You aren't going to see that starting salary with engineering but you can still do really well for yourself with just a BS and then use a potential employer to go back and get your masters or MBA if you want. Good luck!

I don't believe in the whole do what you love and you'll never work a day in your life deal. I'm not saying its a bad choice, if people want to do that then go for it. I just want money more than everything, and I don't have a problem dealing with a more stressful job. I would love to have a fun job, but I also want to have like 10,000 dirt bikes, three wheeler, sleds, etc. So the money's what I try to look at. But still, thanks for the advice, and i'll definitely need the luck laughing

|

Hope for the best, Prepare for the worst.