Life/Career/Education advice

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8/20/2021 1:57 PM

What's up guys. Maybe some on here know but most probably don't. I'm a full time college student and have been for about 4 years now. I've been working really hard on my degree (not saying what it is to avoid going off on a tangent, but maybe I will later) and I'm about 9 classes away from graduating. For most families that would be super exciting news. So why am I hating life and my family currently?

The online stuff has been great for some, but I have really been struggling with it to the point where I just about lost my Fu$%ing mind last week when I found out we weren't going back in person for spring. Got to love communist California.

Anyways it got me thinking. If I'm working this hard on just the degree itself, am I going to hate my life when I actually get to my career? Should I seriously consider doing something else? The thing that motivates me is having nice bikes, a house etc. in the future, not the money itself. And if I'm working even harder than I am right now, will I even want to ride? And If I don't want to ride, why do I need to have a stressful lucrative career when I could just go back to my old job working the call center at my local dealership?

It's funny because those lower level jobs are what motivated me to get an education. Back to square one?

So enough with the victim mentality millennial college kid rant LOL. I guess my question to those of you guys who are in your careers would be, how do you do it? Do you still want to go to the track after working 50-60 hrs or are you just too physically and mentally exhausted, wishing you had an easier career for less pay?

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Don't ever let facts get in the way of a great story

8/20/2021 2:05 PM

Money, time, opportunity
Pick 2
This applies to almost everything in life especially if it's your recreation/hobby.

Sounds like you have 2 semesters left, finish what you started and move on from there, you got a long life ahead of you.

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8/20/2021 2:15 PM

early wrote:

Money, time, opportunity
Pick 2
This applies to almost everything in life especially if it's your recreation/hobby.

Sounds ...more

I was literally just thinking in my head after I hit submit "Why did my dumbass say 9 classes instead of 2 semesters"

And as upset as I am about everything I was still able to make the conscientious decision that there's no way I'm quitting after coming this far. I'm only taking four courses, if I drop any I won't get financial aid. So that's not an option either.

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Don't ever let facts get in the way of a great story

8/20/2021 2:45 PM

Finish off the degree because regardless of your next steps, that shows that you committed to something really big and followed it through until the end. Many people work in an industry but have a degree pertaining to something else.

Then once you graduate, make the decision if it's something you really want to do or not. If not, then world is wide open with so many opportunities to find something that will make you happy. Hopefully it doesn't require more school, but if it does then hopefully your core classes can carry over in some capacity to make it so you're not starting over completely at square one.

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8/20/2021 2:54 PM

I have been making money for 27 years post-degree, but all of it has largely come and gone. The degree gave me a sense of accomplishment and a title no one can ever take away from me, however. It's worth finishing now that you're so close.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

8/20/2021 3:00 PM

I'm just here waiting for the tangent about what degree you chose.

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Instagram: vanillaice782
Amateur helmet painter

8/20/2021 3:07 PM

smashingpumpkins167 wrote:

I'm just here waiting for the tangent about what degree you chose.

Information Technology

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Don't ever let facts get in the way of a great story

8/20/2021 3:07 PM

Get the dammmm degree !!

You can work below your degree but never above you lower job history.

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8/20/2021 3:14 PM

NV825 wrote:

Finish off the degree because regardless of your next steps, that shows that you committed to something really big and ...more

I agree completely and that's always been my mentality. I guess I've just lost sight of all of that over the last few weeks because I'm so mad and also scared about the future. I also figured by this point I would have found my niche within what I'm doing, but with the distance learning and lack of actual experience it's safe to say I've learned almost nothing. Which adds to my frustration and leads to all the screaming and arguing with my friends and family everyday.....

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Don't ever let facts get in the way of a great story

8/20/2021 3:23 PM

Everything everyone here has said is good advice. Finish what you've started.

I'll give you the advice I never listened to that should help ease some of your tension. Start reaching out to people who are doing what you think you may want to do. This is two-fold in its purpose, one, it gives you a firmer idea of what you're getting into, two, it helps you develop relationships that can better steer your ship into a situation you want should you move forward within that career.

That said, I work below my education. But I make enough money to pay my bills and ride my dirt bike and I'm pretty damn contented with my life. Regarding your frustration, I totally understand how you're feeling. I'm not going to pretend to understand the nuances of why you may be fighting with your family and friends, but I've struggled in what I feel your headspace is for longer than I want to admit. All I'll say is try to keep in mind that no one is doing anything to antagonize or hurt you, largely people just want what's best for you. Reminding myself of that fact has helped me prevent taking everything everyone said so personally and pushing people away.

And if I'm way off base, feel free to tell me to fuck off.

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8/20/2021 3:41 PM

TooTallJason wrote:

Everything everyone here has said is good advice. Finish what you've started.

I'll give you the advice I never listened to ...more

Thanks so much Jason, that is some solid advice. Vital is basically my family at this point even though I've only met a few of you guys in person. I've already beat this to death with parents and many others and I know there are a lot of successful dudes on here, so this is where I came. Why pay to go to a therapist when I have you guys?

And to build off of what you're saying my dad is the reason I got into IT, but I think this whole distance learning thing and everything else going on has been hard on our relationship, and lately it's been tough for us to have an actual cordial conversation about anything.

I'm glad to hear you're content with everything and you are proof of what I want in life. Happy and able to pay bills. And most importantly...... ride on the weekends! smile

If I'm way out of line you can tell me to fuck off but, what do you do for work? Did you attend college?

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Don't ever let facts get in the way of a great story

8/20/2021 3:55 PM

hubbardmx50 wrote:

Thanks so much Jason, that is some solid advice. Vital is basically my family at this point even though I've only met a few of ...more

Yep, I have a comms degree, then I went back to school at 32 to get into UX design and for whatever reason just couldn't get into the field. Probably because I'm an introvert and social connections and networking really are the keys to success, especially in tech.

As to what I do, I run a parts department for car dealership service department. We're small enough that I do everything myself, and we work on everything from Bentleys and Maseratis (I even have a 2JZ swapped FJ40 in the shop right now), down to our sales inventory or largely trucks. I don't take my work home and I like hanging out in garages. I still will do design work on the side, but only what interests me. Bonus perk is I have a huge shop to work on my bike, any tool I could possibly need, and work only is M-F 8-5.

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8/20/2021 4:25 PM

smashingpumpkins167 wrote:

I'm just here waiting for the tangent about what degree you chose.

hubbardmx50 wrote:

Information Technology

My brother-in-law is at a pretty high level in Facebook. He’s been a director for MS, Amazon, Twitter, etc.

He hires talent from and for locations all over the world.

He said that the days of hiring the ‘degree-less super hacker’ are pretty long gone, so if you really want to work in that field I’d think that finishing a degree would be a great idea.

He has always put in a fair amount of time, but there’s always seemed to be plenty of time for him to pursue his other interests.

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8/20/2021 5:24 PM

smashingpumpkins167 wrote:

I'm just here waiting for the tangent about what degree you chose.

hubbardmx50 wrote:

Information Technology

APLMAN99 wrote:

My brother-in-law is at a pretty high level in Facebook. He’s been a director for MS, Amazon, Twitter, etc.

He hires talent ...more

Wow. My dad has a degree and tons of certifications, but over the years always seemed to have been against me getting a degree. He's from the school of thought that hard work and "real skills" are all you need, and that a degree in this day and age is more or less useless. That's funny that your brother in law feels the exact opposite. I always thought that a degree in anything related to STEM or Business couldn't hurt. Which is another reason I chose IT. I'm a pragmatic over-thinker.

Facebook you say? So your brother in law sold his soul to the Zuck? wink laughing All jokes aside sounds like he's quite successful.

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Don't ever let facts get in the way of a great story

8/20/2021 5:32 PM

You didn’t come this far to come this far. Finish the degree. Then go back to square one.

Nobody will ever recognize someone that got 9 credit hours from any degree. The degree will showed your completed Something.

I was In your same spot once. Was ready to abandon it all. Thankfully I didn’t.

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GP740
Since 1987

8/20/2021 5:49 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/20/2021 5:59 PM

hubbardmx50 wrote:

Information Technology

APLMAN99 wrote:

My brother-in-law is at a pretty high level in Facebook. He’s been a director for MS, Amazon, Twitter, etc.

He hires talent ...more

hubbardmx50 wrote:

Wow. My dad has a degree and tons of certifications, but over the years always seemed to have been against me getting a ...more

He’s said that there were definitely times in IT where it was almost a badge of honor to not have a degree, be self taught, etc. But he’s made it sound like those days are over.

He did a bit of bouncing around over the last decade, but he’s gotten incredible sign on bonuses to do it.

When he met my wife’s twin sister about 12 years ago or so, he was at MS. Just a little while after they started dating he was hired away by Amazon in a fairly senior role. After about 3 or 4 years with Amazon he was hired away by Twitter and they moved from Seattle to the Bay Area. He got a $250K signing bonus on his first day there, with another $250K on his first anniversary. But he didn’t gel with one of the top dogs there, so he was out at about 11 months. They still paid him the second $250K……

Meanwhile he’d been chatting with some of his former fellow directors at Amazon, and he had basically already been rehired there when he was cut loose by Twitter and returned with a close to 7 figure sign on bonus and at least a 50% increase on his previous compensation.

A few years later, Facebook came to him with another huge signing bonus, and an annual compensation that is very, very close to 7 figures ( more if he makes all the targeted metrics).

Funny thing about him and his degree is that he initially tried to major in Computer Science. To get that BS at the time it took a lot of math, but he could never get higher than a ‘D’ in Calc 4. So he ended up with a BA in Information Services instead.

My oldest son is very mathematically gifted, and did his last 2 years of high school in college. He had just turned 17 when he started his senior high school year, and he took Calc 4 that fall. At Christmas my BIL asked him how he did and told him that struggling with it shouldn’t be embarrassing. My son let him know that he got an ‘A’, and only missed a point or 2 all quarter because he ran out of time on a quiz or something.

From that time forward he’s tried to talk my son into going into IT, but he’s stuck with his passion and is getting very close to his PhD in math instead.

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8/20/2021 6:25 PM

You're in a tough spot dude, and as a 33 yr old "Millennial" I totally understand how you feel. As kids we were sold on the idea that all you had to do was go to college, get a degree, and make boatloads of money living on easy street. Problem is...so many degrees don't get you jack shit. Being in I.T. you do actually have a good outlook on opportunities and in today's world you'll be very useful.

Problem is....you may likely have to start at the very bottom and work your way up over years. Like I said, we thought we'd graduate and immediately be making 100k+ a year but as I found out that's not typical. I graduated with a B.A. in communications. A worthless degree. I did this because I intended to go to law school and just wanted a high GPA to improve my chances of getting into a good law school. Buuuut then I did 2 internships at the Sac County D.A. office and realized law was NOT the career I wanted. I was already so close to graduating though so I just finished school and was left with no idea what to do. I hated criminal law because I saw so many scumbag pieces of shit get off for the worst reasons, public defenders are paid dick, and defense attorneys who make all the money really do have to be pretty soulless....you can literally sit there with a client telling you they raped and murdered someone and you have to try to save their freedom. I couldn't do it.

I also looked into civil law, but as a paraplegic I couldn't honestly represent someone who wants millions of dollars for spilling hot coffee on themselves while I'm sitting here paralyzed in a chair and never got shit because I signed a race waiver. After school I ended up working in a call center for a bank, just needed money and was 22 so I didn't want to live with my parents anymore. After a couple years I ended up transferring to a clerk position at the bank's real estate department. 11 years later....I'm now a manager. I had to work my way up and now have a great career but I NEVER imagined this is where I would end up.

I guess the point of my story is....expect to work your way up. Don't be afraid to start at the bottom. Don't be afraid to leave one job for another with better pay and better work. It won't be easy for a while but live within your means. You can choose a nice house and have no money for other things or visa versa. Eventually as you make more money and work your way up you can always buy bigger/better houses, more toys, more free time to enjoy those toys, etc.

Having a wife/partner helps too! My fiance is a paramedic, without her I couldn't afford this house alone. She's currently in nursing school which could really boost our income. Nursing IS one of those few categories where having that specific degree can net you a great income but she's also 33 and also has a marketing degree that did her no good so she started over with EMT, Paramedic, and now nursing.

Good luck bro, don't feel alone trust me. You're so close to graduating and with a degree in I.T. your future is very promising. With hard work and some time, you'll get where you want to be.

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MCM2 name - RXR_ProKawi24
PS4 Gamertag "Rocko24" - Add me for MES2 (soon to be MES3)

8/20/2021 6:55 PM

We have 2 kids, young adults now but still the kids.
We always told them they were going to get a college degree. We told them that no matter what happens in life, nobody can take away that degree. You can either build on it (a career in that field) or go a different direction and keep it as a fall back option. You can never have too many opportunities. Having the degree opens doors that may otherwise not be open to you.
10 years from now you'll realize just how fast a year passes. Don't get stuck in a job you don't like. Don't confuse a job and a career. it could be the right career but the wrong job. if you don't have options, you may not have a choice. Lastly, you don't want to get stuck working under some dumb ass that got prompted over you just because they had the sheep skin and you didn't.
TM

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www.alljackedupinc.com home of the Switch Hauler®

8/20/2021 7:25 PM

OP keep in mind that this probably isn't the last time you'll be torn about your life choices and direction.

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8/20/2021 7:30 PM

Finish your degree and go start an apprenticeship as an electrician or plumber.

Or go to nursing school- you can get flexible schedules (12 hr shifts) and make six figures (in WI).

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8/20/2021 8:19 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/20/2021 8:20 PM

First off get the degree. I live comfortably without one (and I was closer to a bachelors than you) but that’s one regret I have - maybe when I retire I’ll finish if I can find a school that will take most of my credits. You’ll regret it.

I work shift work and overtime - 4 on 4 off rotating days and nights. Sometimes 6 days a week 12hrs a day for a couple of months in a row rotating days to nights. I’m tired most of the time rotating and I feel like I’ve lost IQ points most days. Now you’d think that since it’s shift work it’s mundane and repetitive. It’s not - you have to use your brain and your brawn to solve sometimes complex problems.

Does it get better? I can’t answer that because I don’t know you - how much bullshit can you put up with? Right now you’re just pleasing your professor - wait until you have people working for you AND a boss. Or wait until you have a family that depends on your income - I enjoy my job most days - but I’ve worked ones I’ve hated but had no choice but to suck it up when I was younger.

Your problem is what everyone usually goes through. Is this worth it? Does it matter? Only you can answer that.

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8/20/2021 10:47 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/20/2021 11:17 PM

I understand your frustration. Although my five year apprenticeship isn’t exactly the same, I had moments of doubt. I started off in plumbing as my plan B. A motorcycle wreck voided my enlistment into the Marine Corps two weeks before I was set to go to basic.
I worked as a ditch digger for a plumbing company that offered an apprenticeship in Oregon after a year. Enrollment was in August. I started in February. So, I waited till the following year. I got passed up as they could only let so many people in. Next year, same thing. I pretty much worked my ass off to remain stuck as a driller. Going through the building and drilling out all the holes for the installers to plumb. I was faster then everyone else. After awhile, I started working for a plumbing shop in Washington. Eight months later, an apprenticeship was offered. When I first started in Washington I was considered a trainee by L&I. I was excited and signed up for this program immediately. We were told we were no longer needed our trainee cards as we were now apprentices.
Five years goes by of going to school 2-3 times a week and I’m ready to take my exam for my journeyman’s license. Come to find out, I only had about 1500 hours instead of 10,000.
Apparently, I needed to keep up on my trainee card.
I called the committee and explained what was going on. They said, we would never tell you guys that. So, myself and 12 other guys are lying?!? There was nothing I could do but, work and, accumulate my hours. Another 4.5 years.

After getting my hours, dealing with frustration, grinding, seeing others get their licenses I finally got mine. It wasn’t easy. I wanted to give up. It took me almost three times as long as everyone else. But, you know what? I’m glad I stuck it out. I’m now a foreman for a commercial company. I can say on the positive side I was able to learn more over that period of time compared to the other guys. I have a medical gas endorsement. I do anything from cryogenics to simple waste piping installations. If I wouldn’t have stuck it out, I have no idea what I would be doing. I know I wouldn’t have the income I have now. One thing that can never be taken away from you is, education. Getting as far as you have to give up is just like running a marathon and quitting when you’re nearly at the end. Your exhausted and, mentally ready to just say F-it. But, if you push yourself to come out the other side, it will get better. School was something I’ve always hated. Doing the job came easier then dealing with classes, tests and, listening to plumbing codes. I’m 43 now. Do I wish I would’ve done something else? Hell yeah. This was my plan B. But, no matter what, that license is something I earned. Something that can’t be taken away. Much like your college degree. Stick it out. You’ll regret it if you don’t. Even if you figure out it isn’t for you, you have a degree that can never be taken away.

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8/20/2021 10:50 PM

Well fuck dude I don’t I know that I have any great advice for you, i’m certainly no life coach”. But here’s a couple things to think about besides the other (good) advice you’re getting in here.
The whole non-social part of this Covid crisis right now fucking sucks ass. Especially since the last few months we have been getting slowly back to normal and now the “Rug of normalcy” if you will is getting yanked the fuck back out from underneath us. It sucks. But you can’t really complain too much about that aspect of it because there are so many people in the world that are way worse off than us because of it. It’s a weird time in history right now. Our only choice is to suck it up and try to move forward staying as positive as possible. You already answered your question on whether to finish or not, at this point you have to, that’s a no brainer.
As far as a career choice ? Almost every job is gonna suck at some point in time, that’s just a fact of life. Might as well get one that pays good money and test the water for awhile, if you wind up really not liking it maybe you’ll have access to more doors than if you never tried. Worst case scenario at least you’ll have a cool bike and shit while you’re flipping burgers trying to figure out what else you wanna try 😂😂😂😂.
Haha good luck man whatever you decide to do and I’m sorry you’re talking to us on Vital instead of partying in a dorm with some college chicks on a Friday night Seems like you’re getting the educational part of college without any of the “parks” of college life, and for that I am truly sorry tongue
Keep plugging along and suck it up buttercup, you’ll get it figured out. Don’t throw in the towel on your college and career choice just yet.

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8/20/2021 11:03 PM

Nv825 finished early.
Shut up and get the degree!

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Go for it! Don't let a little thing like fear, or common sense hold you back.

8/20/2021 11:06 PM

I had half a year left in University when I went to USA, stayed there 5x longer than I intended. Came back home, tried to finish university couple of times, but life just got in a way especially when we got kids.
DO NOT QUIT NOW, NO MATTER HOW HARD IT IS. You will look back and think it was piece of cake. Life is what you make of it. No one can give you advice, you will have to figure it out. You`ll be alright.

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8/20/2021 11:13 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/20/2021 11:14 PM

Brad460 wrote:

Finish your degree and go start an apprenticeship as an electrician or plumber.

Or go to nursing school- you can get ...more

Yeah you just feel like shit for a while when you have a bunch of your 12 hour shifts in a row. Six figures? That's just the beginning if you are really willing to bust your ass. I got this text today. Photo

60 hours contracts are tough, you just work and sleep. Wish I could hit the road again, but I have another baby on the way


So many are leaving the bedside, and from what I hear locally there isn't even a wait list to get into nursing school. I waited two years to get in.

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Instagram: vanillaice782
Amateur helmet painter

8/21/2021 4:30 AM

Finish up school. Burn your degree and go hang drywall.


Photo



Kidding aside, I was close to finishing up my fire science degree. I was doing a lot at one time. Had just got my contractor license (Ca) while I was taking emt classes. Was riding and racing a lot at the time. First week of emt school, I shattered my tib plateau riding (didn’t even fall). Pushed forward, finished emt training, got my cert as well as a few other fire related certs. Was still going to class and trying to rehab my knee. I couldn’t work out without my knee doubling in size. Finally got discouraged enough to quit going to class. Wish I would have finished it out just to say I did it but there was literally no reason to. Being a firefighter just wasn’t in the cards for me. So I continue to glue wood together. Pays pretty good but with 3 little ones I struggle with the motivation to go ride. They are getting bigger and my middle child is getting a pw50 on Monday for his birthday. That should give me the spark to get out and ride more. Lookin forward to it.

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8/21/2021 4:45 AM

As said above, finish the degree. After that is up to you.

Personal experience, engineering related, pertaining to the work element you were talking about. When I was in school, it was school work every day. Weekends, evenings. It was a grind no doubt. Sounds like that's where you're at. I was taking 6-7 courses at a time, so had a heavy load. Ever since I got out, I haven't seen anything like that. Work hours are work hours. And when you're working you get paid for them. Maybe not exactly 1 for 1 if you get in a salaried position but most of those are pretty fair. So if you're worried about the all day every day work continuing, it shouldn't. Unless you want it to. I think that would go with whatever you end up doing after you get out. Can't guarantee that having a degree on your resume will get you what you want, but having an incomplete one this far in might turn some future employers off and be a deciding factor when they have to decide to hire either you or someone else.

Whether to stick with IT later or go another direction is something only you can decide, and it will likely be an evolving decision depending on what opportunities come up.

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HAF

8/21/2021 7:09 AM

Distance learning has led thousands of students to reconsider their plans, so you’re not alone. But with only two semesters remaining, your decision is already made! Go cross that goal line.

A degree doesn’t lock you into a specific career path. However, it does indicate you can set a goal and achieve it. That has value to employers, and is self-fulfilling as well.

The old adage “Life is 10% what happens to you, and 90% how you react” applies here. Go into your final year with a positive attitude, and it will influence every aspect of your life. Being happy is a choice. So is being miserable.

If you’re young, single, and without dependents, guess what? The world is your oyster! With a degree, the possibilities are almost endless.

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"You can't resist the louder pull..."

8/21/2021 7:34 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/22/2021 6:35 AM

There is some solid advise in this thread. As everyone stated, finish what you set out to accomplish. Next analyze the current market and where your soul and intentions lay. Don't chase the money unless you're passionate about what you're doing. Satisfaction comes from finding your purpose then acting upon it. Not currency. Live within your means, find a good soul mate, and wait until your good and ready to have kids. Life is a continuous challenge and a beautiful roller coaster ride.

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