D-Day

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6/6/2020 5:17 AM

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6/6/2020 5:03 PM

Thinking about everyone who fought, including my Nonno, who landed in Normandy and fought through the battle of the buldge, against fascism and authoritarianism.

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6/6/2020 6:14 PM

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6/6/2020 8:36 PM

sandtrack315 wrote:

Thinking about everyone who fought, including my Nonno, who landed in Normandy and fought through the battle of the buldge, against fascism and authoritarianism.

Please....tell us the story of your Nonno. Very interested.

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6/7/2020 8:47 PM

My grandfather fought in Normandy, and my step-fathers mother lost her first husband fighting in Belgium only 3 weeks into his combat tour. He's now buried in a American cemetery in Belgium. My other Grandfather was a Radioman in the Marine Corps who fought in Tarawa, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Hero's, all of 'em.

I own over 30 books on D-Day and have a top 5 that I highly recommend to anyone wanting to dive more into the buildup, landings, and subsequent slog through the Norman hedgerows which proved to be far deadlier than the landing themselves.

John C. McManus being my favorite author of 3 of my top 5. Incredible writer, scholar, historian and has an incredible gift being able to weave in the logistical and strategical importance of the battles, while providing first-person accounts that make every book a page turner.

1. Americans at D-Day (John C. McManus)

2. Americans at Normandy (John C. McManus)

3. The Dead and Those About to Die (John C. McManus)

4. The Germans in Normandy (Richard Hargreaves)

5. The First Wave (Alex Kershaw)

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6/8/2020 12:10 AM
Edited Date/Time: 6/8/2020 12:11 AM

Operation Bagration was the Soviet summer offensive timed to help the battle of Normandy. Its well worth looking at, the complete and utter destruction of Army group centre and putting the Red Army on the Vistula.

Even though it was fought in Byelorussia and Poland it's an important part of the Battle of Normandy that's often overlooked.

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I no longer regret my username.


6/8/2020 9:51 PM

Both of my Grandpa,s where in world war 2. One is American he was shot in the right bicep. My other Grandpaps was a Holland solder, captured and was in a prison camp. After the war, he was released. He dug a hole and hurried his complete uniform and said I will never say a word about the war. And he never did. Left the farm behind, it,s now a camp ground. And moved to America and had a great life. I never heard of anyone hating guns like him, but he ended up getting one. Just in case my super violent dad came to kill him. I had it in my hand when I was 7, felt weird, like it,s only purpose was for 1 kill. I had to drag my Grandpa out of the bath tub. Getting him ready for his wives funeral. I got myself ready not to be shocked, if he was branded in prison camp, but nothing at all. He was trying to die the same day, not eating for the 9 days she was dying at home. I busted him, and said your not getting away with that. We became best friends, I helped him out after work. I taught him how to use a phone, real cute. Microwave food, basic home stuff. I would bring a neat girlfriend out to see him, just tell her treat him like a friend. He was like a teenager and so proud of himself. He didn,t listen to the only route he was to take leaving church. And crossed a busy highway and was hit broadside. Coded twice on the trip to the hospital. After a day we pulled the plug, it was in his will. Big alligator tears running down his cheek. Black intrepid going 80mph, 95 degrees with heat fog coming off the road. I would not hv seen the car either, if I was driving that day.

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6/17/2020 12:11 AM

Not to hijack the topic but present a pair of lesser-known bookends to D-Day.

The first was the largely unknown and utterly disastrous rehearsal for D-Day known as Operation Tiger.

Operation Tiger: D-Day's Disastrous Rehearsal - https://www.npr.org/2012/04/28/151590212/operation-tiger-d-days-disastrous-rehearsal

When the whole affair was over, close to a thousand American troops were dead.

"It's a staggering figure," Milton says. "All the more staggering when you realize that more people were killed in the rehearsal for the landing at Utah Beach than were killed in the actual landing at Utah Beach."


The second was the horrific aerial bombardment used during Operation Cobra, some seven weeks after D-Day, meant to break out of the hedgerow terrain the allied advance had become bogged down in.

In 1944, U.S. Bombers Blasted Nazi Troops — And Accidentally Killed Scores of Americans - https://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/1944-us-bombers-blasted-nazi-troops%E2%80%8A%E2%80%94%E2%80%8A-accidentally-killed-17591

"For COBRA, though, Bradley decided he would rely on a massive bombing run on a roughly four-mile stretch of road, thinking the bombardment would open up the German line and allow U.S. troops to pour through en masse.

COBRA marked one of the first, and soon to be only, times that a large concentration of bomber aircraft would directly support maneuvering units on the ground. Until that point in the war, the United States had mostly conducted what was called “area bombing” and after COBRA, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower prevented anything like it from happening again.

The bombing run would consist of 550 fighter-bombers and almost 2,000 B-17s: hulking four-engine strategic bombers that could drop 4,800 pounds of ordnance onto a target."

In addition, the aerial bombardment, would be assisted by 1,000 artillery pieces. The heavies carpeted the front line with more than 12 million pounds of bombs, turning the land into a cratered moonscape.

When it was over, the bombardment accidentally killed 111 American soldiers and wounded almost 500, including Lt. Gen. Lesley J. McNair, who had come from England to watch the operation.

He would turn out to be the highest ranking American officer killed in battle in the entire war (ironically a victim of friendly fire). Out of sheer rage, American troops knowingly opened fire on their own planes following the incident.

While the operation was considered a success as the German line was annihilated, Eisenhower was so furious that he declared he would never employ strategic bombers on tactical targets again.


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6/17/2020 1:17 AM

race wrote:

Not to hijack the topic but present a pair of lesser-known bookends to D-Day.

The first was the largely unknown and utterly disastrous rehearsal for D-Day known as Operation Tiger.

Operation Tiger: D-Day's Disastrous Rehearsal - https://www.npr.org/2012/04/28/151590212/operation-tiger-d-days-disastrous-rehearsal

When the whole affair was over, close to a thousand American troops were dead.

"It's a staggering figure," Milton says. "All the more staggering when you realize that more people were killed in the rehearsal for the landing at Utah Beach than were killed in the actual landing at Utah Beach."


The second was the horrific aerial bombardment used during Operation Cobra, some seven weeks after D-Day, meant to break out of the hedgerow terrain the allied advance had become bogged down in.

In 1944, U.S. Bombers Blasted Nazi Troops — And Accidentally Killed Scores of Americans - https://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/1944-us-bombers-blasted-nazi-troops%E2%80%8A%E2%80%94%E2%80%8A-accidentally-killed-17591

"For COBRA, though, Bradley decided he would rely on a massive bombing run on a roughly four-mile stretch of road, thinking the bombardment would open up the German line and allow U.S. troops to pour through en masse.

COBRA marked one of the first, and soon to be only, times that a large concentration of bomber aircraft would directly support maneuvering units on the ground. Until that point in the war, the United States had mostly conducted what was called “area bombing” and after COBRA, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower prevented anything like it from happening again.

The bombing run would consist of 550 fighter-bombers and almost 2,000 B-17s: hulking four-engine strategic bombers that could drop 4,800 pounds of ordnance onto a target."

In addition, the aerial bombardment, would be assisted by 1,000 artillery pieces. The heavies carpeted the front line with more than 12 million pounds of bombs, turning the land into a cratered moonscape.

When it was over, the bombardment accidentally killed 111 American soldiers and wounded almost 500, including Lt. Gen. Lesley J. McNair, who had come from England to watch the operation.

He would turn out to be the highest ranking American officer killed in battle in the entire war (ironically a victim of friendly fire). Out of sheer rage, American troops knowingly opened fire on their own planes following the incident.

While the operation was considered a success as the German line was annihilated, Eisenhower was so furious that he declared he would never employ strategic bombers on tactical targets again.


Operation tiger memorial, some fuck up that was. Photo

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I no longer regret my username.