Aortic valve replacement/open heart surgery - Who has had it more than once?

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8/7/2018 2:00 PM

I am getting my ducks in a row to go in and have my third open heart surgery. First was on 12/6/17, to repair my aortic valve which was bicuspid, then became fused and unicuspid. At that time, they also graft my aorta due to an aneurysm in the arch. Second surgery was 12 hours after the first, due to the graft hemorrhaging and needing repair. Now, the valve is failing and my only option is another open heart surgery to replace the valve.

Wondering who has had more than one and how bad the recovery is the second time around. For the first one, I was back to riding moto three months after.

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8/8/2018 12:05 AM

Have you checked into TAVR for your valve replacement? My 87 year old father-in-law just got it today and was up and around a few hours later. Up through the arteries instead of open heart.

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My wife calls you guys the Yahoos.

8/8/2018 2:03 AM

How old are you moto ?

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GP740
Since 1987

8/8/2018 5:12 AM

My wife had her aortic valve replacement almost exactly 11 months ago. She felt better almost immediately, other than the actual surgery pain itself. She was good about using the pillow for however many weeks she was supposed to, and that helped. But the doctor had her on modified exercise for the first 9 months afterwards, so your return to moto was very fast compared to what her doctors asked of her. She started riding her mountain bike outside instead of the nice, controlled gym spin about a month or so ago and she's amazed how much better she feels than she did last year.

She had a tissue valve installed so at some time in the future she will have to have that replaced. Her doc said to expect about 15-18 years with this one. She was worried about that and was leaning toward a mechanical valve because she was told it would last forever but that would have meant blood thinners for the rest of her life and with her Type 1 diabetes, I just hated the idea of adding any other varables to her health issues at all. And the doc also told her that after this replacement that the next would most likely go up through her leg into her heart instead of having to open up her chest, etc. She was 47 when she had the replacement, so she is thinking that when this one "wears out" it should be just in time for her to retire!!!

Good luck with this next replacement. Sounds like it's either too late to go to a tissue valve? If so, please be careful with the blood thinners and riding. Make sure that you always have a medical ID with you and/or have a buddy with you that can let emergency personnel know exactly what you are taking in case you can't. That shit scares the hell out of me.

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8/8/2018 7:49 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/8/2018 7:51 AM

So I take care of post op cabg patients almost every day.

If you’re young, active and healthy tissue valves are good. Yea they don’t last 15 years or so but Usually you can undergo surgery without complication and get another one later. People that are 80...have a low chance of living long enough to need a replacement.

If You’re overweight. Out of shape
Or have a lot of comorbidities Mechanical is fine. Probably because you’re already on a blood thinner....young and active dont wanna be on blood thinners.

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GP740
Since 1987

8/8/2018 7:50 AM

JPT wrote:

Have you checked into TAVR for your valve replacement? My 87 year old father-in-law just got it today and was up and around a few hours later. Up through the arteries instead of open heart.

Yes I have. Unfortunately since I have already had open heart before, and have a partially grafted aorta, there is no way to do the TAVR or minimally invasive surgery. Open heart is my only option.

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8/8/2018 7:52 AM

GeorgiePorgie wrote:

How old are you moto ?

I am 33. Part of the reason why I was able to bounce back and ride 3 months after the surgery. I am "young" and I am very active. I ride moto twice a week, and monitor vitals each time I ride. My resting heart rate is 55-65, and when I am at full moto pace, it is at 190-200.

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8/8/2018 8:07 AM

APLMAN99 wrote:

My wife had her aortic valve replacement almost exactly 11 months ago. She felt better almost immediately, other than the actual surgery pain itself. She was good about using the pillow for however many weeks she was supposed to, and that helped. But the doctor had her on modified exercise for the first 9 months afterwards, so your return to moto was very fast compared to what her doctors asked of her. She started riding her mountain bike outside instead of the nice, controlled gym spin about a month or so ago and she's amazed how much better she feels than she did last year.

She had a tissue valve installed so at some time in the future she will have to have that replaced. Her doc said to expect about 15-18 years with this one. She was worried about that and was leaning toward a mechanical valve because she was told it would last forever but that would have meant blood thinners for the rest of her life and with her Type 1 diabetes, I just hated the idea of adding any other varables to her health issues at all. And the doc also told her that after this replacement that the next would most likely go up through her leg into her heart instead of having to open up her chest, etc. She was 47 when she had the replacement, so she is thinking that when this one "wears out" it should be just in time for her to retire!!!

Good luck with this next replacement. Sounds like it's either too late to go to a tissue valve? If so, please be careful with the blood thinners and riding. Make sure that you always have a medical ID with you and/or have a buddy with you that can let emergency personnel know exactly what you are taking in case you can't. That shit scares the hell out of me.

For me, the recovery wasn't too bad looking at it big picture. Sternum pain because of the wires, but no infections. I went back to work at 6 weeks which was a little too soon (still had pain while driving), but I do not have a very physical job. I was in the hospital (Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN) for five days only. My biggest issue was that I couldn't sleep for three months straight. Very frustrating.

I am 33 years old. So I am actually at a disadvantage when it comes to valve choice. If I were to go with a tissue valve, I would not get the same 15-18 years out of it. My surgeon team is saying 5-10 years for a tissue valve. The reason being, the valve calcifies and deteriorates in younger, normal calcium producing patients. The calcium builds up on the leaflets of the valve and just wears it out. I could go mechanical, and as you said... lasts a life time. But I am not ready to go on blood thinners at my age. I still ride motocross and off road trails, and have a very active lifestyle. I don't want to run that risk or slow down at this point.

I am going with the Edwards Inspiris Resilia valve. In a nutshell, it is a mechanical frame, with a hybrid/anti-calcification tissue for leaflets. It is based on Edwards' Perimount valve, which has been extremely successful. I will not have to be on blood thinners, and I do not have to worry about it wearing out as quickly as a normal tissue valve. It also has the structure to have a "valve within a valve" later on should I need this again.

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8/8/2018 8:13 AM

If you stay active and healthy you will bounce back from surgeries. You don’t wanna be on eliquis racing dirtbikes...

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GP740
Since 1987

8/8/2018 8:22 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/8/2018 8:23 AM

GeorgiePorgie wrote:

If you stay active and healthy you will bounce back from surgeries. You don’t wanna be on eliquis racing dirtbikes...

And that is my saving grace I feel. I am very active. And yeah, not at all. That's just asking for trouble.

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8/8/2018 11:47 AM

JPT wrote:

Have you checked into TAVR for your valve replacement? My 87 year old father-in-law just got it today and was up and around a few hours later. Up through the arteries instead of open heart.

MotoMatt_928 wrote:

Yes I have. Unfortunately since I have already had open heart before, and have a partially grafted aorta, there is no way to do the TAVR or minimally invasive surgery. Open heart is my only option.

That's too bad. Hoping the best for you.

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My wife calls you guys the Yahoos.

8/8/2018 12:10 PM

Arnold Schwarzenegger had a heart valve replaced. Didn't work so they did it again the next day. His wife had hoped it would slow him down but it did the opposite since he felt better.

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8/8/2018 1:15 PM

JPT wrote:

Have you checked into TAVR for your valve replacement? My 87 year old father-in-law just got it today and was up and around a few hours later. Up through the arteries instead of open heart.

MotoMatt_928 wrote:

Yes I have. Unfortunately since I have already had open heart before, and have a partially grafted aorta, there is no way to do the TAVR or minimally invasive surgery. Open heart is my only option.

JPT wrote:

That's too bad. Hoping the best for you.

Thank you!

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8/8/2018 1:26 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/8/2018 1:27 PM

Mr. G wrote:

Arnold Schwarzenegger had a heart valve replaced. Didn't work so they did it again the next day. His wife had hoped it would slow him down but it did the opposite since he felt better.

It's funny you say that. My stamina while riding has greatly improved. I think the only thing I am looking forward to, is having even more improvement once it is fixed, once and for all.

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8/8/2018 6:11 PM

Scary shit fellas. Just turned 60 and have pretty much had perfect health my whole life except for docs almost killing me with penicillin which it turns out I was allergic to. At my age, one starts to wonder, how long can this streak go on? Honestly never gave mortality a thought til the last year or so.

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If it ain't yer's don't take it, If it ain't the truth dont say it, If it ain't right don't do it...Marcus Aurelius

8/8/2018 11:15 PM

Cant give you much advice, but I know the "Ross procedure" is highly recommended by the smart people at my work. The problem is finding a surgeon that wants to, and is comfortable doing it.
BTW the pulmonary valves from my work (cryolife) have the DNA removed. Significantly lower chance of rejection.

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8/9/2018 7:14 AM

colintrax wrote:

Cant give you much advice, but I know the "Ross procedure" is highly recommended by the smart people at my work. The problem is finding a surgeon that wants to, and is comfortable doing it.
BTW the pulmonary valves from my work (cryolife) have the DNA removed. Significantly lower chance of rejection.

I've heard of that before. My mom is a 38 year veteran of the CVICU at our local hospital. I'm a little hesitant to go that route, considering the valve repair failed so quickly. I think replacing the aortic valve with the Inspiris is best for my scenario. I appreciate the info though. It is amazing all of the things they can do now with technology.

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8/9/2018 8:56 AM

MotoMatt_928 wrote:

I've heard of that before. My mom is a 38 year veteran of the CVICU at our local hospital. I'm a little hesitant to go that route, considering the valve repair failed so quickly. I think replacing the aortic valve with the Inspiris is best for my scenario. I appreciate the info though. It is amazing all of the things they can do now with technology.

The inspiris is interesting. I tried to see how they avoid calcification but couldn't find anything too specific on that. Maybe they dont wanna give away their process? Lol its cow pericardium on an expanding mechanical valve. Low rate of calcification, no need for blood thinners, and itll expand as your heart grows (your heart is going to get bigger btw) sounds like a winner for you.
Best if luck!
Also make sure the surgeon floods your chest with co2. I heard some use air, but co2 is better. Been practiced for decades now.

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8/9/2018 9:51 AM

colintrax wrote:

Cant give you much advice, but I know the "Ross procedure" is highly recommended by the smart people at my work. The problem is finding a surgeon that wants to, and is comfortable doing it.
BTW the pulmonary valves from my work (cryolife) have the DNA removed. Significantly lower chance of rejection.

MotoMatt_928 wrote:

I've heard of that before. My mom is a 38 year veteran of the CVICU at our local hospital. I'm a little hesitant to go that route, considering the valve repair failed so quickly. I think replacing the aortic valve with the Inspiris is best for my scenario. I appreciate the info though. It is amazing all of the things they can do now with technology.

colintrax wrote:

The inspiris is interesting. I tried to see how they avoid calcification but couldn't find anything too specific on that. Maybe they dont wanna give away their process? Lol its cow pericardium on an expanding mechanical valve. Low rate of calcification, no need for blood thinners, and itll expand as your heart grows (your heart is going to get bigger btw) sounds like a winner for you.
Best if luck!
Also make sure the surgeon floods your chest with co2. I heard some use air, but co2 is better. Been practiced for decades now.

They just spray some Crisco on the leaflets before they sew you back up. cool

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8/23/2018 4:01 AM

Hey mate I’m from Australia and had avr due to complications from a birth defect 9 weeks ago. Got a pig valve. Still 3 weeks off riding my dirt bike but have been on mtb since 5 weeks post surgery. Don’t ride much motocross more hard enduro/racing offroad. I was 38 when I had my surgery. How did you go returning to riding post surgery. Neck and shoulder pain on the mtb has cut short a few of my rides. Cheers Reece

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8/23/2018 8:10 AM

Reece_Kyte wrote:

Hey mate I’m from Australia and had avr due to complications from a birth defect 9 weeks ago. Got a pig valve. Still 3 weeks off riding my dirt bike but have been on mtb since 5 weeks post surgery. Don’t ride much motocross more hard enduro/racing offroad. I was 38 when I had my surgery. How did you go returning to riding post surgery. Neck and shoulder pain on the mtb has cut short a few of my rides. Cheers Reece

Hey Reece! I got back on the bike at 12 weeks, so it sounds like you are right on track to get back out there. I obviously did not go all out when I returned to riding. Took it easy for the first four weeks or so, and just eased my way back into it until I felt comfortable increasing my pace to back where I was before. I capture lap times and heart rate when riding, so I used that to monitor progress. This next time around, I am going to do the stationary bike at home to help even more.

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8/24/2018 11:59 PM

My father inlaw had 3 heart surgeries. First two they cracked his sternum. The 3rd time they actually went between his ribs from his right side to replace his mitral valve as they didn’t want to crack his sternum again. Good luck with your surgery, they do wonderful things for people nowadays.

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8/27/2018 5:26 AM

My 24 year old nephew is having his 2nd one today, as we speak!

University Hospital in Cleveland. 5-6 hour procedure just kicked off an hour ago. Hoping everything goes perfectly for the kid.

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“If I remember how this worked, you’d put a side on, and then you’d go and have something to eat, and then you’d put another side on.” … Mick Jagger

8/27/2018 12:14 PM

indy_maico wrote:

My 24 year old nephew is having his 2nd one today, as we speak!

University Hospital in Cleveland. 5-6 hour procedure just kicked off an hour ago. Hoping everything goes perfectly for the kid.

Hoping all goes well for him, and a speedy recovery!!

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8/27/2018 12:19 PM

indy_maico wrote:

My 24 year old nephew is having his 2nd one today, as we speak!

University Hospital in Cleveland. 5-6 hour procedure just kicked off an hour ago. Hoping everything goes perfectly for the kid.

MotoMatt_928 wrote:

Hoping all goes well for him, and a speedy recovery!!

Thanks, Matt

Just got this text from my brother: 'Surgeon came in and said all went well and they were taking the breathing tube out and he will be in recovery soon.'

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“If I remember how this worked, you’d put a side on, and then you’d go and have something to eat, and then you’d put another side on.” … Mick Jagger

8/27/2018 12:41 PM

indy_maico wrote:

Thanks, Matt

Just got this text from my brother: 'Surgeon came in and said all went well and they were taking the breathing tube out and he will be in recovery soon.'

Great news!!!

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1/18/2019 11:28 AM

Well the day is closely upon me. I go Tuesday 1/22 to the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. Final visits with the surgeon and anesthesiologist are done, and I am clear for surgery. I expect lots of time on Vital while I recover! laughing

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1/18/2019 11:35 AM

Good luck, Matt.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

1/18/2019 1:32 PM

Yea let us know how you’re doin bud.

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GP740
Since 1987

1/19/2019 2:15 PM

Thanks guys, and will do!!

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