Any wood workers in here?

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12/17/2018 8:54 PM

Anyone ever built something like these "epoxy resin tables"? saw these for the first time today, would love to make a badass outdoor patio table. I've never been a very artsy person, but this seems like it would be really fun to make, the options are endless.
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"So you're telling me there's a chance!!"

12/18/2018 5:31 AM
Edited Date/Time: 12/18/2018 3:08 PM

I've done something similar. Of course it has to have something to do with guitars. The patterns you see are actually burned in using the fractal process and then filled with tinted epoxy resin. The artistic aspect is pretty much left up to nature since the high voltage used goes wherever the hell it wants to go.
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12/18/2018 11:33 AM

I do more simplistic stuff. Here are a few things I've been working on.
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12/18/2018 11:35 AM
Edited Date/Time: 12/18/2018 11:56 AM

borg wrote:

I've done something similar. Of course it has to have something to do with guitars. The patterns you see are actually burned in using the fractal process and then filled with tinted epoxy resin. The artistic aspect is pretty much left up to nature since the high voltage used goes wherever the hell it wants to go.
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That's a pretty sweet concept there. Do you build your own fretboards? It would appear so. What kind of wood do you like to use? The Ebony and Rosewood that custom guitar builders use seems hella expensive. Also, do you have a radius attachment for a sander or is it easy enough to get the radius right without the sander attachment?

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12/18/2018 12:00 PM

rucka356 wrote:

Anyone ever built something like these "epoxy resin tables"? saw these for the first time today, would love to make a badass outdoor patio table. I've never been a very artsy person, but this seems like it would be really fun to make, the options are endless.
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I'm not sure but I think they have to go into a vacuum oven to pull the resin into the wood. This is a common technique when wood is used for things like pens, jewelry etc. It makes it so you can machine it. It fills in the voids and air spaces to make the wood structurally sound, waterproof and impervious to insects.

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We are the sum of a 1,000 lives. What we know is almost nothing at all.

12/18/2018 1:08 PM
Edited Date/Time: 12/18/2018 1:10 PM

borg wrote:

I've done something similar. Of course it has to have something to do with guitars. The patterns you see are actually burned in using the fractal process and then filled with tinted epoxy resin. The artistic aspect is pretty much left up to nature since the high voltage used goes wherever the hell it wants to go.
Photo
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Did you do this yourself? I'd be very interested to hear your whole process. Right now I have 2 red oak logs, one is 25' with a diameter of 36" and the other is a 40' at 38". I'm itchin to do something with them.

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We are the sum of a 1,000 lives. What we know is almost nothing at all.

12/18/2018 3:12 PM

IWreckALot wrote:

That's a pretty sweet concept there. Do you build your own fretboards? It would appear so. What kind of wood do you like to use? The Ebony and Rosewood that custom guitar builders use seems hella expensive. Also, do you have a radius attachment for a sander or is it easy enough to get the radius right without the sander attachment?

Yes I make my own. This one happens to be maple. I also use rosewood, walnut, ebony. For the radius I use my CNC router first then a sanding block with the correct radius for finishing. I made the block too. A lot of shit is easier with CNC.

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12/18/2018 3:18 PM

Kenny Lingus wrote:

Did you do this yourself? I'd be very interested to hear your whole process. Right now I have 2 red oak logs, one is 25' with a diameter of 36" and the other is a 40' at 38". I'm itchin to do something with them.

Yes I did it myself. Once I have the fret board shaped I burn using the fractal process. Go on youtube and and type in fractal burning. You will see how it's done. Once I've burned it I clean out the grooves and fill them with tinted epoxy. Sand flush and then proceed as though it's a regular fretboard.

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12/18/2018 3:20 PM
Edited Date/Time: 12/18/2018 3:43 PM

IWreckALot wrote:

I do more simplistic stuff. Here are a few things I've been working on.
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I love the light fixture with the rigging motif. That painting needs to move though. Or replace it with a picture of a crane with the boom disappearing out the top of the picture.

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12/18/2018 4:44 PM

borg wrote:

I've done something similar. Of course it has to have something to do with guitars. The patterns you see are actually burned in using the fractal process and then filled with tinted epoxy resin. The artistic aspect is pretty much left up to nature since the high voltage used goes wherever the hell it wants to go.
Photo
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IWreckALot wrote:

That's a pretty sweet concept there. Do you build your own fretboards? It would appear so. What kind of wood do you like to use? The Ebony and Rosewood that custom guitar builders use seems hella expensive. Also, do you have a radius attachment for a sander or is it easy enough to get the radius right without the sander attachment?

borg wrote:

Yes I make my own. This one happens to be maple. I also use rosewood, walnut, ebony. For the radius I use my CNC router first then a sanding block with the correct radius for finishing. I made the block too. A lot of shit is easier with CNC.

I kinda started going down the path to trying to build a neckthru bass. Bought a caliper to measure fret spacing, and almost pulled the trigger on a big upright bandsaw but just haven’t done it yet. I had planned on using pecan hickory for the fretboard. It’s the heaviest wood I’ve worked with yet. But rosewood and ebony are higher on the Janka rating. Is the fret spacing very difficult to get right?

They make a fretboard radius sander that makes it possible to do with just a belt sander. A CNC is a pretty good investment.

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12/18/2018 5:17 PM

IWreckALot wrote:

I kinda started going down the path to trying to build a neckthru bass. Bought a caliper to measure fret spacing, and almost pulled the trigger on a big upright bandsaw but just haven’t done it yet. I had planned on using pecan hickory for the fretboard. It’s the heaviest wood I’ve worked with yet. But rosewood and ebony are higher on the Janka rating. Is the fret spacing very difficult to get right?

They make a fretboard radius sander that makes it possible to do with just a belt sander. A CNC is a pretty good investment.

A caliper is really good to have for lots of things but not fret spacing. A fret scale ruler is better if you are going to mark it off and cut by hand. As far as what wood to use, just use what you like. For fingerboards harder wood is what you want but it doesn't have to be as hard a ebony. Especially for a bass. The frets are fat and tall and most people dont do a lot of string bending on a bass so the fretboard just needs to be solid enough to hold the frets.

If you do decide to get into guitar building as a hobby, you don't need a CNC router. I just wanted to build one.

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12/19/2018 4:52 PM

borg wrote:

I've done something similar. Of course it has to have something to do with guitars. The patterns you see are actually burned in using the fractal process and then filled with tinted epoxy resin. The artistic aspect is pretty much left up to nature since the high voltage used goes wherever the hell it wants to go.
Photo
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Kenny Lingus wrote:

Did you do this yourself? I'd be very interested to hear your whole process. Right now I have 2 red oak logs, one is 25' with a diameter of 36" and the other is a 40' at 38". I'm itchin to do something with them.

borg wrote:

Yes I did it myself. Once I have the fret board shaped I burn using the fractal process. Go on youtube and and type in fractal burning. You will see how it's done. Once I've burned it I clean out the grooves and fill them with tinted epoxy. Sand flush and then proceed as though it's a regular fretboard.

Thanks. Wasn't sure how you were getting the resin in. It sounds like you do the basic inlay technique just using fractal burning to make the traditional relief for the resin.

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We are the sum of a 1,000 lives. What we know is almost nothing at all.

12/19/2018 5:57 PM

Yes.

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12/19/2018 10:00 PM

This seems like a worthy project
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