APLMAN99

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12/4/2017 9:12 AM


With winter about here, what all do you have to do to prepare with all those orchards? (water systems, dormant oils? etc. )

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"We don't rent pigs."

12/4/2017 10:14 AM

Winter's been here for a little while now!

We blew out water lines starting on October 30, took 4 full 12 hour days to get it all done. We have some temporary worker housing that we don't use in winter that had to be winterized and that takes longer than it seems like it should.

Post harvest cherry sprays were over 6 weeks ago, and in apples we only had a couple of blocks with enough pest pressure this year to warrant a post harvest oil and lime sulfur application so that was pretty easy.

Getting rid of all the mylar reflective film took a fair amount of time, and disposal of it is a PITA. Have to order a couple of large dumpsters just for that, otherwise it'd take months to just work it in to our regular trash dumpster pickups.

Started applying chicken compost on all of the weaker blocks. Weaker/sandier blocks will get a fall and spring application, while stronger healthier blocks that have already filled their space will get one or the other.

Pruning started in cherries, they were first to defoliate. Seems like it should be a relaxing time but if you get behind on pruning you end up rushing and doing a poor job at the end. And you know that you'll lose several days or maybe even weeks when it gets too cold or there is too much snow in the trees.

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12/4/2017 3:26 PM

Granny Smith's last a long time. That's why they call them Granny Smith's. (APLMAN hates em)

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12/4/2017 3:40 PM

borg wrote:

Granny Smith's last a long time. That's why they call them Granny Smith's. (APLMAN hates em)

I like the money they bring!

But a Granny is a cooking apple, not a dessert apple. I grew up with too many other really good choices than to have to suffer with eating a fresh Granny!

I'm a pretty big Braeburn fan, but they have some issues that make them a bit hard to grow. If you ever find a Cameo around, they are a really good apple that never quite reached enough production to develop a strong marketing effort. Most of the Pink Lady/Cripps Pink strains are really good if you like an acidic apple. Not really sold on Ambrosia, they're a decent apple but almost have a dull, creamy taste as the trees mature. Honeycrisp is awesome, but again has some serious hurdles to grow good quantities of decent fruit.

There are a ton of new "club" varieties just coming into production right now, more than I have spent the time truly taste testing of fruit from mature trees. If you see a variety that you don't recognize or haven't tried, ask the produce clerk for samples. You might find a new favorite!

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12/4/2017 6:22 PM

borg wrote:

Granny Smith's last a long time. That's why they call them Granny Smith's. (APLMAN hates em)

APLMAN99 wrote:

I like the money they bring!

But a Granny is a cooking apple, not a dessert apple. I grew up with too many other really good choices than to have to suffer with eating a fresh Granny!

I'm a pretty big Braeburn fan, but they have some issues that make them a bit hard to grow. If you ever find a Cameo around, they are a really good apple that never quite reached enough production to develop a strong marketing effort. Most of the Pink Lady/Cripps Pink strains are really good if you like an acidic apple. Not really sold on Ambrosia, they're a decent apple but almost have a dull, creamy taste as the trees mature. Honeycrisp is awesome, but again has some serious hurdles to grow good quantities of decent fruit.

There are a ton of new "club" varieties just coming into production right now, more than I have spent the time truly taste testing of fruit from mature trees. If you see a variety that you don't recognize or haven't tried, ask the produce clerk for samples. You might find a new favorite!

"Fresh Granny". You GILF hound. I like a "Fresh Granny' with a little salt and a can of V8. Weird combo but I like it. The AM/PMs around here have fresh apples and bananas and I got used to the taste. Most of the time it's my lunch.

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12/5/2017 11:44 AM

Apple bro...this is interesting. Also, every time I buy apples I look for grown in Lake Chelan to see if I might get some of yours, but I have no idea if they are labeled that way.

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12/5/2017 7:26 PM

Harry Backmon wrote:

Apple bro...this is interesting. Also, every time I buy apples I look for grown in Lake Chelan to see if I might get some of yours, but I have no idea if they are labeled that way.

Our stuff wouldn't say Lake Chelan on it. Packaging usually states where it's packed, anyway, not really where it's grown unless you are crossing state lines to pack, etc. Our apples are packed in Orondo.

Most of our stuff will be packed under this label, and if you see this box or a sticker that says "Grady's Organics", that's about a 101% chance that it was grown by some fantastic farmers and for some silly reason I got a little bit of credit for their hard work!

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12/5/2017 8:06 PM

cool I may have asked before, Do you have big nets over your orchards. It always amazes me the amount of effort that goes into raising Washington apples, very admirable. I love pears too! Salute!

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12/6/2017 10:42 AM

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"We don't rent pigs."

12/7/2017 9:25 AM

borg wrote:

Granny Smith's last a long time. That's why they call them Granny Smith's. (APLMAN hates em)

APLMAN99 wrote:

I like the money they bring!

But a Granny is a cooking apple, not a dessert apple. I grew up with too many other really good choices than to have to suffer with eating a fresh Granny!

I'm a pretty big Braeburn fan, but they have some issues that make them a bit hard to grow. If you ever find a Cameo around, they are a really good apple that never quite reached enough production to develop a strong marketing effort. Most of the Pink Lady/Cripps Pink strains are really good if you like an acidic apple. Not really sold on Ambrosia, they're a decent apple but almost have a dull, creamy taste as the trees mature. Honeycrisp is awesome, but again has some serious hurdles to grow good quantities of decent fruit.

There are a ton of new "club" varieties just coming into production right now, more than I have spent the time truly taste testing of fruit from mature trees. If you see a variety that you don't recognize or haven't tried, ask the produce clerk for samples. You might find a new favorite!

I grew up on an apple tree farm specializing in dwarf apple trees. We had over five hundred varieties. I remember going to apple shows at Memorial Coliseum back in the 80's. I spent many grade school hours grafting & planting. We went broke. Ironically, our farm was at the base of the hill where Sokol Blosser winery and Eyrie Vineyards started the whole NW wine movement. Had my idiot father gone into grapes we may have been rich. ......A good friend of mine, Jason Lett, still runs Eyrie Vineyards making world class wines.........

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12/21/2017 9:07 AM

So weird this topic came up. I have almost always just eaten these softer light green apples ( I don't know what they are called ) but over the past couple months I started trying some different ones. I tried these newer red ones with a tad bit of yellow in them....MMmmMM good! Very sweet and really freakin' good. I need to try some more different ones. I get stuck in my ways and miss out on the more simple things in life.

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And there goes Jeffro. One of God's own prototypes. A super high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.

Pimpin' Ho's , Rollin' fatty's......drinkin' beers , beers , beers!! ~ Ja

12/21/2017 11:01 AM

jeffro503 wrote:

So weird this topic came up. I have almost always just eaten these softer light green apples ( I don't know what they are called ) but over the past couple months I started trying some different ones. I tried these newer red ones with a tad bit of yellow in them....MMmmMM good! Very sweet and really freakin' good. I need to try some more different ones. I get stuck in my ways and miss out on the more simple things in life.

That's actually kinda/sorta funny the way you describe apples by their color, and it's why the apple industry got so far off track and while back and was producing crap for fruit! It's human nature to judge the outside color, obviously, and it ends up changing the quality of fruit over time, oftentimes not for the better!

The old Red Delicious was a decent apple several decades ago, but people kept buying only the deepest red that they could find, which made nurseries and growers keep selecting grafting wood based on the color of the fruit it produced, rather than the taste qualities, and over time it eventually "bred out" the sweet taste of the old Red Delicious and we started growing the equivalent of potatoes on trees.

The same thing has sort of occurred with the Gala and Fuji varieties, but after realizing the mistakes from the Red Del, growers are at least somewhat working hard to select the redder strains that still taste decent for the most part.

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12/21/2017 6:41 PM

jeffro503 wrote:

So weird this topic came up. I have almost always just eaten these softer light green apples ( I don't know what they are called ) but over the past couple months I started trying some different ones. I tried these newer red ones with a tad bit of yellow in them....MMmmMM good! Very sweet and really freakin' good. I need to try some more different ones. I get stuck in my ways and miss out on the more simple things in life.

APLMAN99 wrote:

That's actually kinda/sorta funny the way you describe apples by their color, and it's why the apple industry got so far off track and while back and was producing crap for fruit! It's human nature to judge the outside color, obviously, and it ends up changing the quality of fruit over time, oftentimes not for the better!

The old Red Delicious was a decent apple several decades ago, but people kept buying only the deepest red that they could find, which made nurseries and growers keep selecting grafting wood based on the color of the fruit it produced, rather than the taste qualities, and over time it eventually "bred out" the sweet taste of the old Red Delicious and we started growing the equivalent of potatoes on trees.

The same thing has sort of occurred with the Gala and Fuji varieties, but after realizing the mistakes from the Red Del, growers are at least somewhat working hard to select the redder strains that still taste decent for the most part.

Alp.....again , you got me thinking on my toes here. I'm a huge fruit and vegetable kinda guy. Had to swing by the store tonight and I picked up some Gala , Honey crisp and Pizzaz apples. Never tried any of them. But I believe the ones I bought before which I liked a lot.....were just called " red delicious " ( I think? ). Gonna chow down on a Honey crisp here pretty soon and see what she's like.

As far as a good , sweet and tasty apple goes.....what are your favorites? I'm not talking about making a pie or anything....just grab it and eat it type of apple.

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And there goes Jeffro. One of God's own prototypes. A super high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.

Pimpin' Ho's , Rollin' fatty's......drinkin' beers , beers , beers!! ~ Ja

12/21/2017 7:15 PM
Edited Date/Time: 12/21/2017 7:21 PM

jeffro503 wrote:

Alp.....again , you got me thinking on my toes here. I'm a huge fruit and vegetable kinda guy. Had to swing by the store tonight and I picked up some Gala , Honey crisp and Pizzaz apples. Never tried any of them. But I believe the ones I bought before which I liked a lot.....were just called " red delicious " ( I think? ). Gonna chow down on a Honey crisp here pretty soon and see what she's like.

As far as a good , sweet and tasty apple goes.....what are your favorites? I'm not talking about making a pie or anything....just grab it and eat it type of apple.

Honeycrisp are phenomenal, but it can be very inconsistent getting really good ones and you can't really tell if they are going to be good from the outside. Because they are going for so much money, people are planting a lot of them and cropping them earlier than they normally would/should. From an overall taste standpoint, though, a good Honeycrisp is really hard to beat.

Gala are really good apples, but they do lose some flavor in longer term storage. I wouldn't buy any past the end of March, maybe earlier than that. After that I'd probably buy Fuji or imported Gala.

I like Braeburn a lot, and even though they are hard to find, if you ever see a Cameo, give it a try also. For a more tart apple, Pink Lady is really good.

There are lots of newer "club" varieties out, and I've tried a lot but nothing that just "wows" me. The Cosmic Crisp has potential, as does the Ambrosia. The Ambrosia is a good apple, but tastes a little too "creamy" to me.

https://bestapples.com/varieties-information/varieties/

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12/23/2017 8:05 AM

The thread seems to have been ransacked?

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12/23/2017 10:20 AM

Thanks for the heads up.

Not sure why you'd need to delete your posts if you're leaving, though.

Unless, of course, you're planning on running for public office in the future and worried about what will be considered acceptable then!!!!!!!!!!!!

cool

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12/23/2017 1:19 PM

I did get it. Thanks!

But no, I don't understand the "doesn't respect legacy" reference......

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12/23/2017 2:01 PM

All those pictures must have been inside a quote that was deleted??? wassat

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