new bike every other year

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12/18/2018 4:30 PM

So just wanted to pick everyone's brain a bit about buying new bikes every few years... I've found out with the cost of parts and even more so the time it takes keeping a well used bike going, the cost of a new bike is not that bad. I'm looking at a 2 year turnaround and hoping to keep my 18 in primo shape for the next guy to bring top dollar and do it all over again. I know the markets in different areas may be a bit inconsistent but from gauging prices of used bikes out there I think I will be able to come out as planned... Speaking of the market, it seems while the internet/social media has made used bikes more available it has sure hurt the value. I'm starting to think that it is the perception of good deals out there rather than good deals drive buyers expectations. Those random crazy deals come and go so quick and are few and far between but it has everyone thinking they know "how cheap you can pick up a...". Just curios if anyone has any "tricks" or methods I should say to keeping a new bike.

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12/18/2018 4:33 PM

Take the OEM plastic off right away and keep for when putting up for sale. Frame guards to protect wear points or grip tape or something to limit boot wear. Just maintain it like you expect to keep it forever.

Good plan but good luck getting "top dollar" for any used 4 stroke wink

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12/18/2018 4:38 PM

After you get it replace all of the stock plastic, same goes for the seat. Additionally, as you add aftermarket parts like exhaust, rims/hubs, etc. make sure to keep the stock parts around.

Then when you go to sell you’ll be able to clean it up and assemble it as close to its original state as possible.

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12/18/2018 4:41 PM

just take care of it man. Keep it clean and dont put it away dirty. Scotch brite the frame every wash. Shiny frame pulls attention away from other areas.

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12/18/2018 4:45 PM
Edited Date/Time: 12/18/2018 4:56 PM

yak651 wrote:

Take the OEM plastic off right away and keep for when putting up for sale. Frame guards to protect wear points or grip tape or something to limit boot wear. Just maintain it like you expect to keep it forever.

Good plan but good luck getting "top dollar" for any used 4 stroke wink

Two stroke by the way, TX300 and I went as far as to keep the plastic/exhaust/clutch cover/handlebars/seat cover. I know that it will help but am more worried about the market on used bikes. If I can pay loan off and break even and start over I'll be happy. I don't mind keeping a payment on a race bike considering most people pay way more for cell phones/internet/tv packages. I don't think I would consider it on anything other than a KTM/Husky two stroke. It seems like they don't stick around long used, especially the 300s. The downside to that is they don't stick around new either. When they arrive at the dealer you better have one spoken for and that can be a problem when you need to sale a bike quick in the middle of race season. Any success stories out there with this theory or does it always end bad? I've got a buddy that was racing heavy a few years back. Twice he had his bike spoken for, sold it and bought the new one immediately and once he was stuck with 2 payments for 3 months.

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12/18/2018 5:42 PM

I operated off that philosophy for several years while my boys were on 50's thru 85's. We bought new bikes every year when they first came out so when we sold them they were still in the current year. We were getting help on our bikes from our dealer but even if we were paying retail we probably would have still come out better financially by not having to spend the money for major maintenance/repairs that come with 2 or 3 year old race bikes.

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12/18/2018 5:56 PM

yak651 wrote:

Take the OEM plastic off right away and keep for when putting up for sale. Frame guards to protect wear points or grip tape or something to limit boot wear. Just maintain it like you expect to keep it forever.

Good plan but good luck getting "top dollar" for any used 4 stroke wink

montesagold wrote:

Two stroke by the way, TX300 and I went as far as to keep the plastic/exhaust/clutch cover/handlebars/seat cover. I know that it will help but am more worried about the market on used bikes. If I can pay loan off and break even and start over I'll be happy. I don't mind keeping a payment on a race bike considering most people pay way more for cell phones/internet/tv packages. I don't think I would consider it on anything other than a KTM/Husky two stroke. It seems like they don't stick around long used, especially the 300s. The downside to that is they don't stick around new either. When they arrive at the dealer you better have one spoken for and that can be a problem when you need to sale a bike quick in the middle of race season. Any success stories out there with this theory or does it always end bad? I've got a buddy that was racing heavy a few years back. Twice he had his bike spoken for, sold it and bought the new one immediately and once he was stuck with 2 payments for 3 months.

Just save up the cash and then you can buy your new one when it gets to the dealer, you won’t feel forced to sell your old one, and when you do sell your old one, BAM, you now have 1/2 the cash sitting in your dirt bike savings account for your next new one two years down the road. Problem solved.

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12/18/2018 10:27 PM

JB500 wrote:

Just save up the cash and then you can buy your new one when it gets to the dealer, you won’t feel forced to sell your old one, and when you do sell your old one, BAM, you now have 1/2 the cash sitting in your dirt bike savings account for your next new one two years down the road. Problem solved.

Very true

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12/19/2018 4:42 AM

I usually get a new bike every 2-3 seasons. I am okay with always having a small payment. People say its crazy to have a bike payment but its literally the same amount I pay to have a cell phone. I usually only do abut 30 hours per year so when I sell the bike its under 100 hours. I usually am able to sell the bike for less then I owe and then I turnaround and buy a new leftover. I always buy leftover bikes to save a few grand.

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