mental block when it comes to ruts?

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3/13/2017 6:20 PM

hey folks, long time lurker first time poster.

ill get to it right off the bat here, I am terrible in ruts. ill try to give you some background on myself. I am a quad transplant (yeah, i know) always rode quads until mine broke down one day and my life long riding partner let me ride his cr125 all day and I was hooked. So Ive owned about all the colors and models of bikes by now, and Ive raced XC and only played around on moto.

what kicks my ass is ruts, and after watching the MX2 race in Indonesia recently it blow my freakin mind how you guys manage ruts, stay in a rut wide open clicking gears and then launch off the face of a 100 footer and the face is lined with ruts. you figure with me being a woods rider id learn to love them, but no. as soon as I see them i tense up get tight and then start screwing up. front tire climbs out, start paddling my feet you name it. there are some days much better than other and I must say i navigate ruts on my yamis and suzukis far better than any other brand. some days when im on I can ride them decent but its always been a major weakness in my already poor skill set. what gives

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3/13/2017 6:26 PM

Look at the end of the rut and where you want to go. If you focus on your front tire you get into the trouble you've explained.

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3/13/2017 6:28 PM

When using them to turn stay as low as possible in the rut and let the rut steer your bike. You can coast into a rut but once you feel the rear shock flex into that rut hammer the gas and stay low.

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3/13/2017 6:31 PM

motokawi818 wrote:

Look at the end of the rut and where you want to go. If you focus on your front tire you get into the trouble you've explained.

...what he said. The same rule applies regardless of ruts. Don't look where you are, look where you want to go.

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3/13/2017 6:32 PM

Look ahead through the rut, don't ride off your front fender. Keep your inside leg tight against the bike, elbows up. Get your braking done before the turn, keep enough momentum through the turn where you don't have to gas it early wanting to shoot you out of the rut.

That's just a few to start. Man these kind of things take time. Even the experienced riders and pros still continue to work on things like this.

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3/13/2017 6:36 PM

I havent ridden in years but had the same issue when I started.

For me it was just focusing ahead and just plain hours on the bike that made me better through deep ruts.

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3/13/2017 6:37 PM

If you're talking about ruts in a straight, it helps a lot to keep your weight back, loosen your grip a little to avoid the urge to give too much steering input. Don't chop the throttle. This is all assuming sprocket bolts are torqued to spec and pizza is ordered.

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Osama Bin Mixin - Head of the 2-stroke Taliban

3/13/2017 6:37 PM

Look ahead, and use a nice even amount off throttle through the whole rut.

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3/13/2017 6:44 PM

Me too.

Fast guy showed me the way somewhat. Get in a gear with the revs up, gas on to lighten the front wheel and weight back a bit, butt off the seat.

I ain't no RC them there, but it helps. Anytime you can turn worry into attack is good. Look ahead.

Practice your weaknesses.

Also, is there a line along the edge that is less rutted, that is the best deal.

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JS7 is the most entertaining rider since Hannah, my first hero,. even living in the frozen north.
Dirt biking from 11 to late 50’s, loves wood riding on the old 525.

3/13/2017 6:50 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/13/2017 6:51 PM

thing is ive been one bikes for close to a decade now so I cant use the excuse that im still new. i know you guys are 100% right on focusing on where you want to go - not where you DONT want to. I swear to god, ill see a rock or tree stump in the middle of an open field and all I can thing is "dear god whatever you do dont hit that" - you can probably guess what happens next.

anyway, im without a bike right now but im chomping at the bit more than ever to get out and try it again. in the past when i woods raced i expected the same results i got when I was on the quad and tried to force shit and it killed the fun super quick for me. so now im gonna just accept that im not phenom. the nasty woods ruts that are filled with tree roots are a whole nother issue, they pop your tire up out of them and its especially difficult in a turn.but hey, everyone on the track is faced with the same obstacles.

what really killed me is when a kid who had never rode went and got a bike, then instantly started winning races and here I am years in a mid pack B rider. ahh well, thats another thread

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3/13/2017 6:51 PM

Welcome back to playing for our team.

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much ty. How to spot a paid forum poster/artificial forum traffic producer (see list of actions/phrases below):

Copius pattern amounts of phrases like “Anyone have”..., “Anybody know?”.... and their variations.

Thoughts?
Any help is appreciated!
Thanks in advance!





3/13/2017 6:52 PM

I always struggled with ruts bad. I always rode mostly hard packed tracks where i live when i was riding so didn't see ruts very often.

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3/13/2017 6:53 PM

Do you have suspension setup for your weight/size ? The difference is amazing once your bike is setup for you. Gives lots more confidence.

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3/13/2017 6:57 PM

nascarnate326 wrote:

Do you have suspension setup for your weight/size ? The difference is amazing once your bike is setup for you. Gives lots more confidence.

ive played with clickers, half knowing what im doing and set sag. but no ive never had a revalve done for me. its def on the list when i score my next bike. I rode a buddies ktm 450xc out in the slop after coming off my 250f. his bike had factory connection suspension and shitty worn out michelins and that bike was pretty much magnetized to the ground. it was unreal the confidence it gave me. i could throw it any corner at any speed i felt.

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3/13/2017 6:58 PM

level wrote:

I always struggled with ruts bad. I always rode mostly hard packed tracks where i live when i was riding so didn't see ruts very often.

same here. the only place i have to practice/play ride is smooth as a babys ass. its great to go hold it wide open and feel like a hero but its shit for replicating a race

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3/13/2017 6:59 PM

Front brake is the key. Lean into the turn with your head and shoulders. Look where you want to go and roll the throttle on. Do not go from zero to wide open. The revs on the bike should never completely drop. Keep a finger on the front brake and gently apply pressure. If will help keep the front wheel in the rut when it wants to come out

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3/13/2017 7:01 PM

This is going way back but spending a lot of time doing timed laps is what helped me most. Practice the tips above and spend a lot of time railing corners, it will become second nature and extremely fun. I have seen that some guys like doing figure eights to increase speed in corners. Find some good loamy dirt on flat ground and start doing figure eights, that ought to help you rail the ruts.

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3/13/2017 7:02 PM

kzizok wrote:

Welcome back to playing for our team.

not that there's anything wrong with it....

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3/13/2017 7:12 PM

Best advice I can give is be smooth and look ahead, controlled entry and smooth throttle control. I've struggled with the mental side of it in the past, once you build confidence and loosen up and let the bike do its thing it becomes a lot easier

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3/13/2017 7:15 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/13/2017 7:17 PM

You lost me at quads and life partner.....

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3/13/2017 7:21 PM

Drag your front brake in rutted sweepers to keep the front end locked in and help steer.

Finding the right lines on a rutted jump face is purely based off instinct that comes from experience and line development awareness IMO. Take your time with it.

JT$ was a badass ruts rider maybe he has some tips.

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3/13/2017 7:43 PM

JW381 wrote:

If you're talking about ruts in a straight, it helps a lot to keep your weight back, loosen your grip a little to avoid the urge to give too much steering input. Don't chop the throttle. This is all assuming sprocket bolts are torqued to spec and pizza is ordered.

Do you take a nap before you rail ruts and bang sluts or after?

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3/13/2017 8:12 PM

Pit bikes helped me build confidence in them. Riding off-road trails really is gnarly if you make it. When you get to a moto track it all seems so gentle.

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youtube.com/iridea250fyamaha

3/13/2017 8:14 PM

Ride in them a lot. Standing helps too.

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3/13/2017 8:16 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/13/2017 8:17 PM

Katoomey wrote:

You lost me at quads and life partner.....

You single? Lol

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3/13/2017 8:28 PM

RPM68 wrote:

Pit bikes helped me build confidence in them. Riding off-road trails really is gnarly if you make it. When you get to a moto track it all seems so gentle.

this, for sure. im still not real confident in jumping because its something I never got to do but as soon as I started riding mx I was hooked. it seemed to be less of a pain in the ass and more fun cause I wasnt fighting the bike constantly. I can navigate ruts in moto much easier than I can in the woods.

ill probably get roasted for this and I deserve it anyway, but years back I always used to listen to the announcers at SX & MX talk about deteriorating track conditions and roll my eyes. thinking "yeah... groomed loamy soil it must be so tough"

then I went to my first outdoor national and saw it with my own eyes.

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3/13/2017 8:30 PM

I generally go around them....noones paying me to be a hero.

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3/13/2017 8:44 PM

A couple of thoughts:

Consider raising the forks in your clamps a couple of mm if you are climbing out of ruts.

If your bike is green, like my last one, aim 6" inside of the line you really want to take. If it's white, orange or yellow. Just point your belly button where you want to go and look at the exit.

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3/13/2017 8:54 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/13/2017 8:55 PM

Only two ways to do it for me
Either go side to side and just climb out of them, aiming to make a line where there isn't one on the extreme edge, or go balls out and think of the rut as a berm keeping u from careening off the mountain. Used to hate them, climbed out like crazy tighten up as soon as I seen them etc. If u go a lil faster than u are comfortable, the rut can become the only thing holding u on the trail, which helps to gain confidence in them. My 14 yz450 has a small tuck or wash in flat corners. Give me a slight groove of a rut all the way up a gnarly rut past the swingarm I'm good. When they are so deep the pegs drag and the dirt pulls your feet off the pegs, that's when I start going side to side like a BMX biker up a huge steep hill. Usually if it's so deep the pegs drag, u can still cross 5 or 6 at a time riding side to side, aiming for a clean line somewhere on the very edge of the trail. It's times like that I like to think " what line would pourcel take". Lol

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when in doubt, pin it out

3/13/2017 8:59 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/13/2017 9:07 PM

For me, an 80 front tire helps the climb out compared to a 90. Also the only tires that seem to work in ruts for me ( front tire) are the Dunlop mx32(mx3s). (31 before that, 756 before that). Bridgestones, pirelli, a Michelin all had issues somewhere I didn't like. Esp ruts. Damn Dunlop's throw every side knob after 7 or 8 rides though. I figure small price to pay for a track record of staying upright, and confidence. I know personally front tire affects this a ton. For example do u run the mx51 or mx52 front tire? Cuz that could be your whole problem...

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when in doubt, pin it out