MX school/camp expectations.....

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3/28/2013 10:07 AM

with all the motocross camps / schools / instructors / trainers out there, what would be your expectation
on say sending a mid pack B rider to one?
Would you think he could be taught to be a top pro?

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rickys james mc hannah 469...ama pro career wins...and counting
which means these riders have an average of 92 wins ea...
which is equal to over 3 years of winning every single sx and natl each...
15 years of absolute total 100% domination ...just sayin' ...

3/28/2013 10:30 AM

Chances are pretty slim for just about any one. I don't think I would personally make the investment unless my kid was killing everyone locally. And if he's already on big bikes, and only a mid pack B rider chances are just about 0 in my opinion. Too late.

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3/28/2013 10:33 AM

It all depends on what camp you send him too, and if the rider has the heart and determination to take his motocross skills to the next level. Anything is possible when you have the right resources.

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3/28/2013 11:05 AM

A mid-pack B rider that just moved up to the B class is a big difference from a guy who has been stagnating in the B class.

The one thing you can't teach is aggression. You also can't give someone the desire and the passion it takes to work hard and keep learning.

You can teach an old dog new tricks...

I have been riding MX bikes since age 8, but I didn't have a bike from age 23-27. I learned more from age 27-32 than all of my previous riding experience as a youngster. That's amazing when you consider the fact that I spent most of 2007 in Iraq, most of 2008 in Afghanistan and then 2 more years in Afghanistan from June 2010 - June 2012.

I was typically in the top 3 in Novice/Junior/C class at age 23. Now I'm running top 5 in the B class and killing it in the 30+ B. Scrubbing, whipping, all that kid stuff. The passion and desire was always there, but I finally learned the right technique.

Send the kid to a riding school with a good instructor. Don't try to make a national pro as your main goal. It takes a very special individual and a very special set of circumstances. If it happens, support it, if not, have fun racing and enjoying the sport you love.

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3/29/2013 9:22 AM

Its is not my son, but some people I know of
almost 19, mostly mid pack finnishes at lorrettas

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rickys james mc hannah 469...ama pro career wins...and counting
which means these riders have an average of 92 wins ea...
which is equal to over 3 years of winning every single sx and natl each...
15 years of absolute total 100% domination ...just sayin' ...

3/29/2013 11:12 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/29/2013 11:12 AM

Are you talking a full-time camp? One-day clinic? Obviously there's a wide array.

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3/29/2013 11:27 AM

if he's mid pack B at Loretta's then he's already smoking most of the local kids, IMO if it's a top notch program he's got a chance, a slim chance, but a chance if he is really dedicated and has the desire.

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3/29/2013 11:47 AM

GuyB wrote:

Are you talking a full-time camp? One-day clinic? Obviously there's a wide array.

believe they are thinking of making it a 6 mnth camp type deal

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rickys james mc hannah 469...ama pro career wins...and counting
which means these riders have an average of 92 wins ea...
which is equal to over 3 years of winning every single sx and natl each...
15 years of absolute total 100% domination ...just sayin' ...

3/29/2013 12:55 PM

This.
Photo

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Mike

3/29/2013 1:34 PM

It depends on a lot of things, including his drive and desire, actual talent (or ability to overcome a lack of it with hard work), the equipment he's on, etc.

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3/29/2013 5:04 PM

If they're that good, they know how to get better. Doesn't mean they will though. Everyone develops at different speed, emotionally, mentally, physically. After 6 months, or less, you will have a few or less that will want more. IMO, moto is the greatest sport in the world, it takes talent, hard work, luck, strength, stamina, heart, persistence, concentration, and everything else. You will need every one of those to be at top level of you want to be top pro, but missing one or two you could still get to race at a fairly high level, which is honorable. Add in bike problems, injuries, girls, cars, tv, drugs, school, it's a tough road. I believe it's money well-spent, as long as the kid thinks it's a good idea too, and it won't break the bank.

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3/30/2013 5:56 PM

I run the South of the Border MX Training Complex in South Carolina. There are tons of variables in that question. If the kid was riding and practicing consistently, on good equipment, against good competition, that kid will be closer to his potential than a weekend warrior with one bike that is broken half the time. The 20th place kid at LLs is about 12 to 15 seconds a lap off the leaders so there is a ton of ground to make up,

Some of the things a kid will get out of a program like ours are as follows:

1. We will detect and fix major issues in technique. This will help them go faster in a more consistent and safe manner.

2. They will ride three hours a day, 4 to 5 days a week. Seat time matters.

3. They will participate in daily motos with a group of kids who are consistently placing in the top 5 at the amateur nationals. They will very quickly learn how fast "national fast" is.

4. They will practice starts way more than they want to. Most important part of the race is the first 20 yards.

5. They will see the hard work and sacrifice it takes to become one of the best. Some will embrace it, many will not.

6. They will work harder off the bike than they ever did before.

If a kid is coachable, has consistently good running bikes (no time off due to mechanicals), stays healthy, has the right level of aggressiveness, and brings it every day, he can easily go from mid pack at LLs to near the front.

My son is a perfect example. He went from being around a 10-15th place rider at the amateur nationals from 2008 to 2011. He started training full time in 2012 and secured a fantastic opportunity to ride some very good bikes and won a title in B class at the Mini Os last year with seven top 5s and two podiums. At this years spring nationals he had a championship, a second, a couple of thirds and two or three more top 5s. For him, outside of great bikes, the most important thing is competing with top kids every day. When they get to a national they are used to the intensity and level of speed the top kids have,

Anyone with any questions regarding full time training can e-mail me at:

mburkeen@nc.rr.com

Mike Burkeen

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