cycling recommendation

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3/25/2020 9:41 AM

Whats a good Value set up for a new cyclist?

Any recommended shoes or pedal sets that dont break the bank?
Again, im looking for best value, as i will use it to just train, not race or anything..

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3/25/2020 10:28 AM

Kind of like shopping for mx helmets and stuff on the cheap, check out sites that have closeouts/sales on last years stuff. Chain Reaction cycles, Jenson USA, Competitive cyclist,etc...happy hunting!

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3/25/2020 10:30 AM

TSCHAM101 wrote:

Whats a good Value set up for a new cyclist?

Any recommended shoes or pedal sets that dont break the bank?
Again, im looking for best value, as i will use it to just train, not race or anything..

Lots of good used stuff out there and leftover clearance. I got my shoes for half price as they were the previous model. Only gear I have not gotten on sale was a Castelli jacket I bought as a treat to myself.

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3/25/2020 10:49 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/25/2020 10:50 AM

Are we talking about road cycling?

Don't skimp on the contact points, especially shorts. Unlike mtb, your butt is on the seat the majority of the time on a road bike. I would put most of your budget there.

I've always had good luck with Shimano and Giro shoes. Shimano has some good options for under $100.

For pedals, "Look" style pedals can be had for pretty cheap. I know a lot of guys who run SPD mtb pedals and shoes.

I wouldn't worry about a cycling specific jersey at first. Having the pockets is nice, but not mandatory. Get a cheap moisture-wicking shirt.

You don't have to have a helmet with MIPS, so again like shoes, a lot of good options under $100.

My go-to online stores are:
JensonUSA
Competitive Cyclist
Amazon
My local bike shop.

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3/25/2020 10:54 AM

I recently got back into cycling. Bought a 10 year old bike on FB marketplace that had been well-taken care of. Seems like $500 is the price-point for mid-level road bike in the last 10 years for the Atlanta market.

I bought Look pedals and then discovered how much they squeak. Seems inconsistent and I spray bike chain lube on the pedals before I ride, but apparently it's pretty common with Look pedals and cleats.
I went with fizik's budget shoes, but I like budget oriented shimano and giro shoes.

If you want more specific advice, I put together a doc for some friends with more thorough recommendations. Just message me.

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3/25/2020 10:58 AM

3 years ago i got into cycling (mtb) for "training". 4 mtbs later, i own no dirtbikes and started racing MTBs this year. silly
I run SPD pedals (fairly cheap) on all my MTB and road bikes with currently bontrager shoes (120 bucks i think) and have had no issues.
Comfortable saddle and good cycling shorts are very important. and like stated earlier a dry fit or something for a shirt.
I use my local bike shop or worldwidecyclery.com but they mostly concentrate on MTB and im not sure on what cycling youre getting into.

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3/25/2020 11:02 AM

Get a bike the proper size and get it fit properly for your body. The contact points are very important. Get a good quality seat with a cut out thats the right size and shape for your ass bones. Shimano clipless pedals are a good choice. Giro makes good variety of shoes at a good price. Get good shorts with good padding.

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3/25/2020 1:21 PM

Update.. for road cycling... just wanna ride out my front door and go for a rip.. i got the bike fitted...

what shorts do yall prefer?

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3/25/2020 1:31 PM

Pearl Izumi makes really good products. Worth it to spend a little bit more on shorts.

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3/25/2020 1:38 PM

TSCHAM101 wrote:

Update.. for road cycling... just wanna ride out my front door and go for a rip.. i got the bike fitted...

what shorts do yall prefer?

Get a set of bibs if you plan on riding more than 10 miles. I have a set of short bibs, cold weather weight full leg bibs and a set of 3/4 bibs. Make sure the chamois is good. Buy some chamois butter for the inevitable monkey butt. I also have a couple pairs of Fox MTB shorts that have a removable set of chamois tights. Sometime I will wear those on my CX bike or if I am just out for a ride to dick around. Buy a seat bag and stuff a spare tube, levers and Co2. I also carry a small folding tool. Throw some lights with flashers front and rear. You can get a cheap cycling jersey because you are gonna want those pockets on longer rides.

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3/25/2020 3:32 PM

I know this sounds crazy but maybe go into a local bike shop and ask them to help you out. If they aren't helpful, then shop around. Now more than ever, local businesses need our support.

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3/25/2020 3:42 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/25/2020 3:50 PM

get a slightly used cannonade supersix off PINKBIKE for 3500-4000 that was a 8k bike a year ago.
if MTB and not doing jumps bigger than say 10-15ft go with an XC bike, like a 12-15 cannonade scalpel 29er in carbon

I run "egg beaters" for pedals on my road and xc bikes so you can use the same shoes and your pedal stroke and foot feel and clip in/out will be identical.


if you want a real budget bike that's kick ass I'm selling a spare backup specialized Venge carbon in 56cm id make you an absurd deal on. never ridden.


https://www.pixelsbin.com/image/EVZH6

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3/25/2020 3:49 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/25/2020 3:52 PM

You can always find someone’s living room queen they hug laundry on for years. You can find killer deals on Facebook and craigslist. Components in the last 10 years are great. Spend your money on a good set of shoes out of the box and don’t look back. Have you been measured for bike fittment? If not do that before you even start looking. Proper frame, crank, stem, reach, etc are very important.
If not just get a Peloton.....they are offering 0% interest.

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3/25/2020 4:04 PM

TSCHAM101 wrote:

Update.. for road cycling... just wanna ride out my front door and go for a rip.. i got the bike fitted...

what shorts do yall prefer?

Shorts, like shoes, are very subjective. From a quality and fit standpoint, I've been a Pearl Izumi user for almost 20 years and I've never had an issue. You can get their "Attack" short for less than $80. The "Pro" is about $150 in comparison.

Castelli and Louis Garneau make good stuff, as well, and they have shorts in comparable price points.

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3/25/2020 4:07 PM

options + compatibility = cycling life. Stick with shimano or sram for drive train, crank, pedals and you won't run into many hurdles. Best to keep everything under one brand for maximum compatibility. Shimano 105 probably most reliable entry level set up.

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3/25/2020 4:08 PM

TSCHAM101 wrote:

Update.. for road cycling... just wanna ride out my front door and go for a rip.. i got the bike fitted...

what shorts do yall prefer?

I don't want to douchebrag but I've been road riding for almost 30 years and raced elite/cat 1 for 15 years of that and still ride about 10000 miles/year, just for fitness and fun now. Like others have said, don't skimp on the contact points.

Shorts - bib shorts are about 1000% better. The premium stuff like Assos and Rapha is nice, but there are plenty of good value shorts. Castelli Velocissimo or Sportful BodyFit Pro (same company effectively) can be had for good prices on sale and are great shorts for the money. I routinely ride the Sportful on 4-5 hour rides and my ass feels no different in them versus premium Castelli or Assos. Be warned, Italian clothing is generally undersized. For example, I'm a medium in Pearl Izumi tops and bottoms, mostly a large in Castelli/Sportful but I've had to use XL in some of their premium products that are cut for World Tour pros! Get 2 pair, and never ever wear shorts multiple times without washing (bacteria). Also consider some form of chamois cream, which helps with friction and prevention of sores. I really love "Enzo's Buttonhole", I've used it for about 6-7 years now. It is 100% safe, no nasty chemicals like some other brands.

Shoes - make sure you get a good fitting shoe. It's really hard to tell until you ride them, that's the problem. Sizing wise you can be pretty snug in length, as you don't really spread your foot out the same as running or walking. When trying on, try to simulate pedalling forefoot pressure but also lead forward and see if your heel wants to lift up out of the heal cup. BOA systems are all the rage currently, but there's nothing wrong with a ratcheting buckle/velcro strap combo either. Look for a carbon sole, and if you have average feet try something from Shimano, they have a good fit for most people and they also have wide versions in their upper end. Have a look at the RC701, a very good value. Giro also nice, a bit wide in the heel cup for me personally. Louis Garneau and Pearl Izumi are not at the forefront of shoes but they have some nice options. You could try to keep it Moto and get Gaerne or Sidi, beware that both have a relatively narrow fit especially Gaerne. Sidi are also ridiculously expensive these days. I've worn Sidi for 25 years mostly, but the last year I have been in the Shimano RC901 and I'm not looking back.

Pedals - the most popular choice is the Shimano SPD-SL system. Whether they are right for you is another question. They have some rotational float depending on the cleat, but it's not super smooth. Speedplay Zero are a good option if you want maximum adjustability and free feeling float, but they are fussy compared to Shimano. Time Xpresso have a nice float, but unfortunately Time's durability has really sucked in the last 10 years. I was a loyal Time user until the past 3 seasons when I've been riding Speedplay. I need to have a decent amount of float, all the old Moto injuries incurred have made me less than symmetiric, plus all the years of pedalling has created imbalances that will likely never go away.

There's a lot of great deals online but it's a risky market when you don't know your sizes or preferences. I'd suggest finding a good local road shop in your area and getting some advice from them. Quickly looking at Norco you have an Incycle shop nearby. They've been in biz a long time in So Cal, and used to sponsor a domestic pro cycling team back in my racing days (buddy from Calgary raced for them). Seems like they'd be a good place to start. The Swapmoto podcast always advertises for Roy's Cyclery, endorsed by Christian Craig. Maybe don't get any supplements there w00t

Feel free to PM me for more info if you need it. And if you are a size 9ish in an American shoe let me know, I've always got a shoe overstock going on laughing Wife loves to see bike shit being shipped!!

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Old MXer turned Superfan.

3/25/2020 4:28 PM

Great insight from most, especially hamncheeze.

With anything, you get what you pay for in cycling. Comfort is so important because you’re already suffering physically. Might as well reduce the pain in all areas as much as possible.

I started in cycling in 2010 as cross training for moto. I bought an alloy Shimano 105 equipped bike initially, and bought affordable cycling gear to start. Over the years I’ve upgraded bikes and kits, and can honestly say spend as much as you can.

As far as bikes go, they actually don’t improve performance/speed a huge amount. The major different is ride experience. A carbon bike with carbon wheels ride smoother than an alloy bike. The more expensive components you get, the smoother and crisper your shifting and pedaling is. Electronic shifting is phenomenal. Power meters are the next level for your training that are really cool.

I currently ride my dream bike, an S-works Tarmac Disc. I can honestly say it doesn’t make me by faster than a $3k equipped 105 carbon bike, but my smile is much bigger on the S-works!

For shorts, bibs are an absolute must. Shoes, having a carbon sole is really nice. Regular plastic shoes get soft fast and rob you of power put out.

A cycling computer made by Garmin or Wahoo is excellent to track all your vitals like speed, heart rate, cadence, power and calories burned during your ride. Also you can download routes and get turn by turn direction using safe/fun routes others have used, Strava is an app used to track your ride and compare your times against others during small and big parts of your ride called segments. Make sure you record all your rides on Strava, it will be really cool to see your progression over the days/months/years.

Good luck, embrace the pain and appreciate the places your bike can take you!

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3/25/2020 4:33 PM

The is a company in Colorado that makes some very nice cycling gear products.
https://www.boure.com/

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3/25/2020 6:25 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/25/2020 6:42 PM

Zaugg wrote:

I know this sounds crazy but maybe go into a local bike shop and ask them to help you out. If they aren't helpful, then shop around. Now more than ever, local businesses need our support.

This!

You can find a ton of deals on used bikes. HOWEVER, if you don't know how to size, fit, maintain, etc. a bike already you're unlikely to end up with a positive outcome. Go to a reputable bike shop and they will make sure you're set up properly.

I agree with Kyle with the exception of the part about carbon bikes. A modern high-end aluminum bike, like a CAAD12, will be better than a comparably priced carbon bike. Everyone wants the bling factor of carbon, but unless you go top-shelf the quality is hit or miss.

Also, tires make a huge, huge difference in how a road bike feels.
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3/25/2020 11:20 PM

bird wrote: This!

You can find a ton of deals on used bikes. HOWEVER, if you don't know how to size, fit, maintain, etc. a bike already you're unlikely to end up with a positive outcome. Go to a reputable bike shop and they will make sure you're set up properly.

I agree with Kyle with the exception of the part about carbon bikes. A modern high-end aluminum bike, like a CAAD12, will be better than a comparably priced carbon bike. Everyone wants the bling factor of carbon, but unless you go top-shelf the quality is hit or miss.

Also, tires make a huge, huge difference in how a road bike feels.

I agree on carbon bikes. If one is looking for the absolute pinnacle of performance in a road bike then yes it is the best material. Carbon bikes are great until they take any form of impact, then one has a crushed seat stay or top tube and it's bin it or seek out a carbon repair company. There are great value aluminum bikes out there, the CAAD12 as mentioned above, also the Trek Emonda ALR, and the Specialized Allez Sprint come to mind. There are other bikes I'm probably forgetting. I've ridden steel, aluminum, Ti, and carbon extensively and I've raced at a high level on all of them at some point. Good fitness always trumps frame material. But I'm not knocking anyone who wants to buy a modern superbike. For me, at age 51, not racing any longer they are not for me. When I see the cables and the hydraulic lines being run through the head tube and fork steerer on some of the latest superbikes my head starts to spin and I realize as a guy who does all his own work....I don't want or need that complexity!

Another thing to consider is....do you really just want to pound the pavement or do you want a bike that can take some bigger tires and ride some light gravel trails and/or roads? Gravel riding is the new dandy of cycling in N America, and the market has absolutely exploded with bikes and is starting to sub-segment within itself. But there are some good do-it-all bikes that can ride like a road bike but still take a big enough tire to ride some not-too-burly gravel. The Trek Domane series comes to mind, I believe you can run a 700x30C tire on them. The Specialized Tarmac series also can take a 30C tire. I've got a good stable of bikes but if I had to whittle it down to one it would be my custom steel gravel bike that rides pretty good everywhere, even has fender mounts because where I live you either ride in the rain, or you don't ride for months and months.

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Old MXer turned Superfan.

3/25/2020 11:24 PM

If you are budget conscious get a Pinarello Dogma F12. Affordable and a decent starter bike. grin

Jokes aside, a good seat and pair of shoes is always a must for me.

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2018 CRF250R

3/25/2020 11:30 PM

feelit2morrow wrote:

If you are budget conscious get a Pinarello Dogma F12. Affordable and a decent starter bike. grin

Jokes aside, a good seat and pair of shoes is always a must for me.

LOL, that is the budget conscious bike of choice for the dentist/lawyer/doctor crowd! With Campy Super Record EPS and Boras of course. I went down the road of the princess Italian bike a few years ago (Colnago C60 w/ DA Di2) and ultimately ending up selling it. Just didn't do it for me in the long term.

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Old MXer turned Superfan.

3/25/2020 11:45 PM

hamncheeze wrote:

LOL, that is the budget conscious bike of choice for the dentist/lawyer/doctor crowd! With Campy Super Record EPS and Boras of course. I went down the road of the princess Italian bike a few years ago (Colnago C60 w/ DA Di2) and ultimately ending up selling it. Just didn't do it for me in the long term.

I dont know that I would know what to do with something like that. Last year I upgraded to a Giant TCR advanced pro and about had a heart attack writing that check. I can't imagine spending 4x as much..

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2018 CRF250R