Why no status on Moreau?

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2/17/2020 12:20 PM

TxGuy wrote:

back to the suggestion of warning lights. Super bright lights before these sections with YELLOW (be aware) and RED (perhaps skip the section? while medics triage the situation) - it would sure work during practice/qualifying.

During races, the RED could mean to roll the entire section perhaps. IT would buy the medics a few more minutes to get their arms around the situation without bikes jumping over their damn heads.

EDIT - give the switch to the Asterick team that are dotted throughout the course to make the call on the lights. I don't know - it's just an idea - poor kid. HATE reading all this. If I was his parent....eek.

We already have that...generally for whoop sections and triples.

The bigger issue is, as long as the track is still green, guys are going to try and get in their qualifying times. The clock is ticking. There's always a push and pull about getting the track clear (so that riders can get clean laps), and safety (so medical crews can do what they do).

Personally, going forward I'd love to see more red flags during practice sessions in the interest of achieving both of those goals.

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2/17/2020 12:24 PM

From another site - Brian is in Intensive Care at the hospital after a crash in his first-ever free practice session at the Tampa SX that left him with a fractured C7 vertebra. Brian was rushed to the hospital and into emergency surgery. We have read that the doctors are waiting for the swelling to go down before releasing a full prognosis, but early reports have not been good.

Here's wishing for a full recovery.

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2/17/2020 12:26 PM

TxGuy wrote:

back to the suggestion of warning lights. Super bright lights before these sections with YELLOW (be aware) and RED (perhaps skip the section? while medics triage the situation) - it would sure work during practice/qualifying.

During races, the RED could mean to roll the entire section perhaps. IT would buy the medics a few more minutes to get their arms around the situation without bikes jumping over their damn heads.

EDIT - give the switch to the Asterick team that are dotted throughout the course to make the call on the lights. I don't know - it's just an idea - poor kid. HATE reading all this. If I was his parent....eek.

GuyB wrote:

We already have that...generally for whoop sections and triples.

The bigger issue is, as long as the track is still green, guys are going to try and get in their qualifying times. The clock is ticking. There's always a push and pull about getting the track clear (so that riders can get clean laps), and safety (so medical crews can do what they do).

Personally, going forward I'd love to see more red flags during practice sessions in the interest of achieving both of those goals.

I’d prefer they go back to the old 2 practice sessions followed by qualifying races. It would allow the riders to get better oriented to the track and make alternative lines without the pressure to hurry up and get in a fast lap.

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2/17/2020 12:29 PM

TxGuy wrote:

back to the suggestion of warning lights. Super bright lights before these sections with YELLOW (be aware) and RED (perhaps skip the section? while medics triage the situation) - it would sure work during practice/qualifying.

During races, the RED could mean to roll the entire section perhaps. IT would buy the medics a few more minutes to get their arms around the situation without bikes jumping over their damn heads.

EDIT - give the switch to the Asterick team that are dotted throughout the course to make the call on the lights. I don't know - it's just an idea - poor kid. HATE reading all this. If I was his parent....eek.

GuyB wrote:

We already have that...generally for whoop sections and triples.

The bigger issue is, as long as the track is still green, guys are going to try and get in their qualifying times. The clock is ticking. There's always a push and pull about getting the track clear (so that riders can get clean laps), and safety (so medical crews can do what they do).

Personally, going forward I'd love to see more red flags during practice sessions in the interest of achieving both of those goals.

Guy, personally I would like to see rider comms limited to Med crew and race control only. In Brian's case he could have said, "I have no feeling in my legs". This would have triggered the red flag and the Med crew would have been able to act accordingly.

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2/17/2020 12:30 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/18/2020 7:03 AM

TxGuy wrote:

back to the suggestion of warning lights. Super bright lights before these sections with YELLOW (be aware) and RED (perhaps skip the section? while medics triage the situation) - it would sure work during practice/qualifying.

During races, the RED could mean to roll the entire section perhaps. IT would buy the medics a few more minutes to get their arms around the situation without bikes jumping over their damn heads.

EDIT - give the switch to the Asterick team that are dotted throughout the course to make the call on the lights. I don't know - it's just an idea - poor kid. HATE reading all this. If I was his parent....eek.

Black Diesel Bomber wrote:

The lights would be a great idea because you could have spotters up high who can activate the lights on that section of the track when they see a downed rider in danger.

But this gets tricky as well when trying to incorporate it.

Definitely possible though and I think it's a good suggestion because how many times have you seen a downed rider lay there with no flaggers in sight, or flaggers who are just standing there doing nothing?

Wade221 wrote:

I need to go back and re-watch the moment, but there was part where a dude crashed in front of like three track crew/Alpinestars personnel, and was pinned under his bike, and it seemed like they just stood there staring at him and then were playing “rock, paper,scissors” to decide who was getting him. Obviously, the last part is not true, but they just stood there looking, then all them moved, then no one could decide what to do.. felt like an eternity

That was Vince Friese that was stuck under his bike. They may not have seen him at first because he was in that deep sand berm at the of the sand straight and there were Tuff Blocks on top of the berm. Photo, I think Alex Ray crashed in pretty much near the same spot, but on the opposite side of the track, they were there immediately and they also order a red flag. This was when Alex was down...

When we're in the stands we look down on everything and see pretty much everything. When you're in the center of the track and bikes are going all around you, and it's very loud, it's not as easy to see everything. The Mobile Medics and the track crew are at every race and I think they almost always do a great job.

I'm glad Vince and Alex were both all right and I pray that Brian Moreau is too.

DC
Racer X

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2/17/2020 12:43 PM

I broke my T4-T9 2 years ago and the surgeon told me that the only thing that saved me from being paralysed was the medic who advised me not to move a muscle until an ambulance arrives and they then put me in a neck brace and on a back board. I was probably laying on the track for 30-40 minutes and everyone had to wait for me to be collected by emergency staff. This was at a local track in England. How trained alpinestars medical staff could possibly make an error like this at the highest level of racing absolutely blows my mind. I hope that Brian can make a full recovery. 🤞

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2/17/2020 12:50 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/17/2020 2:06 PM

Black Diesel Bomber wrote:

The lights would be a great idea because you could have spotters up high who can activate the lights on that section of the track when they see a downed rider in danger.

But this gets tricky as well when trying to incorporate it.

Definitely possible though and I think it's a good suggestion because how many times have you seen a downed rider lay there with no flaggers in sight, or flaggers who are just standing there doing nothing?

Wade221 wrote:

I need to go back and re-watch the moment, but there was part where a dude crashed in front of like three track crew/Alpinestars personnel, and was pinned under his bike, and it seemed like they just stood there staring at him and then were playing “rock, paper,scissors” to decide who was getting him. Obviously, the last part is not true, but they just stood there looking, then all them moved, then no one could decide what to do.. felt like an eternity

DC wrote:

That was Vince Friese that was stuck under his bike. They may not have seen him at first because he was in that deep sand berm at the of the sand straight and there were Tuff Blocks on top of the berm. Photo, I think Alex Ray crashed in pretty much near the same spot, but on the opposite side of the track, they were there immediately and they also order a red flag. This was when Alex was down...

When we're in the stands we look down on everything and see pretty much everything. When you're in the center of the track and bikes are going all around you, and it's very loud, it's not as easy to see everything. The Mobile Medics and the track crew are at every race and I think they almost always do a great job.

I'm glad Vince and Alex were both all right and I pray that Brian Moreau is too.

DC
Racer X

I just watched it. It was Heat 2, first lap, Josh Cartwright. The yellow flag was waving, but he was frantically waving his hand for someone to help, while THREE people FIVE FEET AWAY stared at him! Eventually people from outta no where came to assist. Now, I don’t know all the rule or whom is allowed to render assistance, but it was clear the field had passed at this point, so it seemed like time was being wasted. But I wasn’t there

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2/17/2020 2:26 PM

From KTM...

Troy Lee Designs/Red Bull KTM Factory Racing’s Brian Moreau suffered a major crash during Saturday’s Free Practice session at the seventh round of the AMA Supercross Championship in Tampa, Florida. The French rider was immediately rushed to a nearby hospital where he underwent surgery to repair a fractured vertebra in his neck. Moreau is in stable condition at this time as he awaits further information from doctors.

The Moreau family released an update on Sunday morning via social media stating: “Hit in the vertebrae, Brian had surgery last night at Tampa hospital. Surgery is good and Brian woke up. He is currently in intensive care but doctors will not be able to decide on his condition in several days…Brian is a very brave and strong boy and is aware of everything!”

TLD/KTM Team Owner, Troy Lee: “Brian is a very tough kid and we know he will tackle this injury and do whatever he can to make a full recovery. Everyone at Troy Lee Designs and KTM are fully supporting his recovery every step of the way. I want to also thank both Marvin and Mathilde Musquin for all the support they have given Brian from the very first day he showed up in California. Mathilde has been at the hospital with Brian since his crash and has been amazing to work with during this difficult time.”

KTM North America, Inc., along with the Troy Lee Designs/Red Bull KTM Factory Racing and Red Bull KTM Factory Racing teams are sending positive thoughts to Brian and the Moreau family at this time.

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2/17/2020 2:29 PM

slipdog wrote:

I’d prefer they go back to the old 2 practice sessions followed by qualifying races. It would allow the riders to get better oriented to the track and make alternative lines without the pressure to hurry up and get in a fast lap.

I'm not sure I get your point. He was injured in the first free (untimed) practice.

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2/17/2020 2:29 PM

GuyB wrote:

While there's no doubt that the handling of this particular situation doesn't look good, I also wasn't in on the inside of what they were dealing with.

That said, I do think we're much better off with the Alpinestars Mobile Medical crew being there every week than relying on local medical crews at every race.

In the meantime, let's keep our thoughts on a good recovery for Brian.

Could you explain why you think it is better for the Astar crew than medics?
I was also under the impression they both are there. In other sports they have a medical team(s), but also have local medics.

I do have to say the way they handled it(judging from what info we so far) is unacceptable. Makes me sick.

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2/17/2020 2:33 PM

So very sad....prayers for this young man as whatever the prognosis and outcome, he has a long difficult journey ahead of him

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2/17/2020 2:45 PM

I rad earlier on Twitter that someone who saw it said he was pinned under his bike and kicking his legs to get out ( like Marv at Red Bud)… if that's the case the guys can be forgiven IMO, get the bike off the guy and get the guy off the track.. if he hadn't moved , like A Ray, or Benny Bloss in an earlier round, they would have reacted maybe differently..

These guys do a difficult and dangerous job, they need to be respected for that .

Lets hope he makes a good recovery.

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2/17/2020 2:52 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/17/2020 2:53 PM

GuyB wrote:

I'm not sure I get your point. He was injured in the first free (untimed) practice.

Everything is rushed since they switched to "timed qualifying", even free practice. It's a dangerous sport no matter what and Brian's situation could still have happened but I think the old was better. That was all I meant.

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2/17/2020 3:10 PM

philG wrote:

I rad earlier on Twitter that someone who saw it said he was pinned under his bike and kicking his legs to get out ( like Marv at Red Bud)… if that's the case the guys can be forgiven IMO, get the bike off the guy and get the guy off the track.. if he hadn't moved , like A Ray, or Benny Bloss in an earlier round, they would have reacted maybe differently..

These guys do a difficult and dangerous job, they need to be respected for that .

Lets hope he makes a good recovery.

That was Vince

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2/17/2020 3:11 PM

In other sports.... player down. Medic/team personal/trainer asks where are you hurt. If you are knocked out. They check vital signs and do what they have to make sure you are breathing.... then touching, not moving fingers/limbs make sure you have feeling. If the player is awake/responsive... the slightest concern of a head/neck/back injury the player isn’t moved.... stabilized, yes. Will go to extreme lengths to make sure that doesn’t happen. In a pile of players..... they don’t move. The news is horrifying... The pictures are absolutely disgusting!!! Especially if he was yelling he could not feel his legs...

Either way... myself, along with my family will be praying this young man is able to gain full strength and live the life he wishes to have!

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2/17/2020 3:16 PM

philG wrote:

I rad earlier on Twitter that someone who saw it said he was pinned under his bike and kicking his legs to get out ( like Marv at Red Bud)… if that's the case the guys can be forgiven IMO, get the bike off the guy and get the guy off the track.. if he hadn't moved , like A Ray, or Benny Bloss in an earlier round, they would have reacted maybe differently..

These guys do a difficult and dangerous job, they need to be respected for that .

Lets hope he makes a good recovery.

Luke_Richards wrote:

That was Vince

Ah ok, they sounded like the kind of guy that would have been able to tell a 250 rider from a 450 rider.. so if that is bum info I will stand corrected .. the rest of it stands, I think they have been doing a decent job, I cant recall last time I screamed at the TV . And I would have.

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2/17/2020 3:46 PM

FerCzD wrote:

I am no expert and don't know how to manage a situation like this, all I have is a question hoping someone can give me some feedback. In one picture he is sitting on the mule, can't tell if he is having support to carry his own weight (above waist). From someone I know, that had a spinal injury; after the incident he was not able to carry his weight (sitting). He was carried out on a stretcher.

Does anybody know that if you have trauma like in this case is normal to be able to carry your own weight?

Hoping for the best to Brian.

Yeah that picture of him sitting up actually makes me a little more hopeful cause if his injury level is C7 that means he shouldn't be able to 'activate' his core so he shouldn't be able to be sitting up straight like that..
Unless they have him strapped up tight but they don't seem to..
Also, and this might be just a case by case thing but my neck was really fucken swollen like twice it's normal size and Brian's doesn't seem to be.. I'm clutching to things with hope here..
I'm just really sorry for him, it's really long, hard road

Again unless you are a trained emergency medic (there's gotta be a better name for them that I don't know) I don't think any of us are in a position to call the medical crew names.. These people are obviously trained to do the job, there's advances in this stuff all the time and maybe the big advantage to recovery is getting him to facility quicker rather than laying in the dirt for half an hour like I was..
I refuse to believe that any of the medical professionals have anything but the utmost care for the riders well being..

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why am I reading this? ..... Oh christ, now I'm posting...... shiiiiiiiit!!

2/17/2020 3:53 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/17/2020 3:55 PM

Doddy wrote:

Could you explain why you think it is better for the Astar crew than medics?
I was also under the impression they both are there. In other sports they have a medical team(s), but also have local medics.

I do have to say the way they handled it(judging from what info we so far) is unacceptable. Makes me sick.

I'm not gibby but I'll respond anyways.

First of all we all make mistakes. I've made some they've negatively impacted my life, and even other peoples lives. Its part of being human.

As far as the Astars group over local medics. They have a good track record, with the number of injuries they see they sure get it right frequently. And they know the gear we wear, and the sport itself. Ever had your local medic take a knee brace off a broken leg? A boot? No way the local medics all keep up with the latest in quick release helmets, neck brace systems, under jersey roost guards.
Lastly this sport is brutal. Ya know there was a big group of seals, marines, etc setting up one of those obstacle course races along the side of a track. I ate it HARD. Guess who stood there in shock and awe as the other riders ran to help me... local medics are qualified to treat moto injuries. But watching a scary crash, and running onto a track surrounded by other motorcycles and acting appropriately in that moment?

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2/17/2020 3:57 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/17/2020 4:00 PM

yz25 wrote:

In other sports.... player down. Medic/team personal/trainer asks where are you hurt. If you are knocked out. They check vital signs and do what they have to make sure you are breathing.... then touching, not moving fingers/limbs make sure you have feeling. If the player is awake/responsive... the slightest concern of a head/neck/back injury the player isn’t moved.... stabilized, yes. Will go to extreme lengths to make sure that doesn’t happen. In a pile of players..... they don’t move. The news is horrifying... The pictures are absolutely disgusting!!! Especially if he was yelling he could not feel his legs...

Either way... myself, along with my family will be praying this young man is able to gain full strength and live the life he wishes to have!

I guarantee in other sports avenues as football, soccer, baseball, etc, if a player is down the event is stopped. I understand racing is different but could you imagine someone who's neck or back is hurting and can't move their legs being dragged off of a football field so the "game" could go on. This is wrong on so many levels for the medics and organizers.

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2/17/2020 4:09 PM

FerCzD wrote:

I am no expert and don't know how to manage a situation like this, all I have is a question hoping someone can give me some feedback. In one picture he is sitting on the mule, can't tell if he is having support to carry his own weight (above waist). From someone I know, that had a spinal injury; after the incident he was not able to carry his weight (sitting). He was carried out on a stretcher.

Does anybody know that if you have trauma like in this case is normal to be able to carry your own weight?

Hoping for the best to Brian.

jemcee wrote:

Yeah that picture of him sitting up actually makes me a little more hopeful cause if his injury level is C7 that means he shouldn't be able to 'activate' his core so he shouldn't be able to be sitting up straight like that..
Unless they have him strapped up tight but they don't seem to..
Also, and this might be just a case by case thing but my neck was really fucken swollen like twice it's normal size and Brian's doesn't seem to be.. I'm clutching to things with hope here..
I'm just really sorry for him, it's really long, hard road

Again unless you are a trained emergency medic (there's gotta be a better name for them that I don't know) I don't think any of us are in a position to call the medical crew names.. These people are obviously trained to do the job, there's advances in this stuff all the time and maybe the big advantage to recovery is getting him to facility quicker rather than laying in the dirt for half an hour like I was..
I refuse to believe that any of the medical professionals have anything but the utmost care for the riders well being..

Man I have major respect for you to be able to give your actual insight into this matter. Not sure if I could be as strong as you are in reliving such a difficult event. Really shows how strong of a person you are!
Of coarse we are all just “spit balling” the matters that really cant change anything now.
Not to get off topic. we are all hoping/wishing/praying for the best for this young man.
But I would to do the very same for you!

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2/17/2020 4:11 PM

colintrax wrote:

I'm not gibby but I'll respond anyways.

First of all we all make mistakes. I've made some they've negatively impacted my life, and even other peoples lives. Its part of being human.

As far as the Astars group over local medics. They have a good track record, with the number of injuries they see they sure get it right frequently. And they know the gear we wear, and the sport itself. Ever had your local medic take a knee brace off a broken leg? A boot? No way the local medics all keep up with the latest in quick release helmets, neck brace systems, under jersey roost guards.
Lastly this sport is brutal. Ya know there was a big group of seals, marines, etc setting up one of those obstacle course races along the side of a track. I ate it HARD. Guess who stood there in shock and awe as the other riders ran to help me... local medics are qualified to treat moto injuries. But watching a scary crash, and running onto a track surrounded by other motorcycles and acting appropriately in that moment?

So I get what you are saying, but I thought both Astars and local medics are at the events. Sounds like that isn't the case?
What I asked Guyb, is why he thinks it's better to have the Astar crew than medics. Both seem important to me.

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2/17/2020 4:21 PM

yz25 wrote:

In other sports.... player down. Medic/team personal/trainer asks where are you hurt. If you are knocked out. They check vital signs and do what they have to make sure you are breathing.... then touching, not moving fingers/limbs make sure you have feeling. If the player is awake/responsive... the slightest concern of a head/neck/back injury the player isn’t moved.... stabilized, yes. Will go to extreme lengths to make sure that doesn’t happen. In a pile of players..... they don’t move. The news is horrifying... The pictures are absolutely disgusting!!! Especially if he was yelling he could not feel his legs...

Either way... myself, along with my family will be praying this young man is able to gain full strength and live the life he wishes to have!

peltier626 wrote:

I guarantee in other sports avenues as football, soccer, baseball, etc, if a player is down the event is stopped. I understand racing is different but could you imagine someone who's neck or back is hurting and can't move their legs being dragged off of a football field so the "game" could go on. This is wrong on so many levels for the medics and organizers.

Agree! The Medics have the ultimate call. If they say red flag, The show fugging stops! Safety trumps all!!! Period

If we all, as a sport, don’t have this mentality we should.

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2/17/2020 4:25 PM

Praying for Brian and his family during this tough time. Really hoping he can make a full recovery. Hate how dangerous our sport can be.

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2/17/2020 4:35 PM

Spinal Immobilization is an EMT basic skills. 1 semester at career point collage can teach you that. Where is your pain? Can you wiggle your toes? Squeeze my hands? Did you get knocked out? What city are you in? What's your name? Are you on blood thinners? Then you apply the cervical collar, long backboard and head immobilizers. The long backboard should be removed once extricated to the ambulance.

The medic crew made a major mistake.

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2/17/2020 4:38 PM

FerCzD wrote:

I am no expert and don't know how to manage a situation like this, all I have is a question hoping someone can give me some feedback. In one picture he is sitting on the mule, can't tell if he is having support to carry his own weight (above waist). From someone I know, that had a spinal injury; after the incident he was not able to carry his weight (sitting). He was carried out on a stretcher.

Does anybody know that if you have trauma like in this case is normal to be able to carry your own weight?

Hoping for the best to Brian.

jemcee wrote:

Yeah that picture of him sitting up actually makes me a little more hopeful cause if his injury level is C7 that means he shouldn't be able to 'activate' his core so he shouldn't be able to be sitting up straight like that..
Unless they have him strapped up tight but they don't seem to..
Also, and this might be just a case by case thing but my neck was really fucken swollen like twice it's normal size and Brian's doesn't seem to be.. I'm clutching to things with hope here..
I'm just really sorry for him, it's really long, hard road

Again unless you are a trained emergency medic (there's gotta be a better name for them that I don't know) I don't think any of us are in a position to call the medical crew names.. These people are obviously trained to do the job, there's advances in this stuff all the time and maybe the big advantage to recovery is getting him to facility quicker rather than laying in the dirt for half an hour like I was..
I refuse to believe that any of the medical professionals have anything but the utmost care for the riders well being..

To touch on your point, I too am hopeful at the situation and here's why.

From my observation looking at the following photo (without seeing the bottom half), Brian appears to be bearing weight.

The guy on the left supporting him appears way too relaxed. If Brian had "dead legs" the guy would be braced and giving it all he's got to try and keep him standing upright. The lady on the right isn't doing much either. If he was dead weight from the neck down, the lady would more than likely be supporting Brian behind the knees/thighs in order to help lift him up in the other paramedics arms.

Photo

I fucked up a transfer once, when I first got to the rehab after my injury and the guy that was there to help out with the transfer, had to give it everything he had to keep me from collapsing the floor.

Regardless, it's a serious issue and I hope that he makes a full recovery.

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"Sorry Goose, but it's time to buzz the tower."

2/17/2020 4:47 PM

yz25 wrote:

Man I have major respect for you to be able to give your actual insight into this matter. Not sure if I could be as strong as you are in reliving such a difficult event. Really shows how strong of a person you are!
Of coarse we are all just “spit balling” the matters that really cant change anything now.
Not to get off topic. we are all hoping/wishing/praying for the best for this young man.
But I would to do the very same for you!

Yeah thanks for that but honestly it's not that hard (Maybe cause I don't remember it and 'woke up' two days later haha)
Although saying that I did just have a little cry at the thought of what that poor young man is going through, I wish I could just get in his ear and let him know it's not as bad as he's thinking, I mean it's not great but it's not that bad, but I also know that no one can 'hear' that so soon after it feels like the world has fallen away.. But ya just take it a day at a time and see where it gets you..
As for you not being strong enough? Well I hope you never find out but you'd be very surprised, I thought the same pre '03 but ya just seem to get on with it every day..

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why am I reading this? ..... Oh christ, now I'm posting...... shiiiiiiiit!!

2/17/2020 4:55 PM

I just get sick when I hear about these injuries, I pray he will make a full recovery.

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2/17/2020 4:59 PM

I hope Moreau will be ok.

Tough situation all around.

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2/17/2020 5:02 PM

Just jumping in here to wish the guy well. This part of our sport sucks and makes me sick every time it happens.

Hope he makes a full recovery and can continue to chase his dream.

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Alright Lunger, Let's Do It

2/17/2020 5:07 PM

FerCzD wrote:

I am no expert and don't know how to manage a situation like this, all I have is a question hoping someone can give me some feedback. In one picture he is sitting on the mule, can't tell if he is having support to carry his own weight (above waist). From someone I know, that had a spinal injury; after the incident he was not able to carry his weight (sitting). He was carried out on a stretcher.

Does anybody know that if you have trauma like in this case is normal to be able to carry your own weight?

Hoping for the best to Brian.

jemcee wrote:

Yeah that picture of him sitting up actually makes me a little more hopeful cause if his injury level is C7 that means he shouldn't be able to 'activate' his core so he shouldn't be able to be sitting up straight like that..
Unless they have him strapped up tight but they don't seem to..
Also, and this might be just a case by case thing but my neck was really fucken swollen like twice it's normal size and Brian's doesn't seem to be.. I'm clutching to things with hope here..
I'm just really sorry for him, it's really long, hard road

Again unless you are a trained emergency medic (there's gotta be a better name for them that I don't know) I don't think any of us are in a position to call the medical crew names.. These people are obviously trained to do the job, there's advances in this stuff all the time and maybe the big advantage to recovery is getting him to facility quicker rather than laying in the dirt for half an hour like I was..
I refuse to believe that any of the medical professionals have anything but the utmost care for the riders well being..

-MAVERICK- wrote:

To touch on your point, I too am hopeful at the situation and here's why.

From my observation looking at the following photo (without seeing the bottom half), Brian appears to be bearing weight.

The guy on the left supporting him appears way too relaxed. If Brian had "dead legs" the guy would be braced and giving it all he's got to try and keep him standing upright. The lady on the right isn't doing much either. If he was dead weight from the neck down, the lady would more than likely be supporting Brian behind the knees/thighs in order to help lift him up in the other paramedics arms.

Photo

I fucked up a transfer once, when I first got to the rehab after my injury and the guy that was there to help out with the transfer, had to give it everything he had to keep me from collapsing the floor.

Regardless, it's a serious issue and I hope that he makes a full recovery.

Photo

"Bearing weight?" I don't think so. :-(

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