Who has came back from colon cancer?

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11/18/2020 9:18 AM

Well a few months ago I was diagnosed with colon and rectal cancer. I didn’t ride much dirt this year because of pain and fatigue but now I’m trying to get optimistic for 2021.
Who has been through this and I know the timetables are varied but after you healed up did you regain enough
strength and enjoy riding?

I went from 215lbs to 169 and strength is lacking. I’m plannOmg on a lot of gym time next year.

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11/18/2020 10:34 AM

Sorry to hear that, man. I don't have any experience with cancer other than some skin removals, fortunately.
You hit the nail on the head when you said you were going to remain optimistic, though. Keep the chin up! We'll be pulling for you.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

11/18/2020 10:44 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/18/2020 10:45 AM

I have not dealt with this, but can offer this as someone whose treatment included major surgery with inherent lasting side effects: be gentle with yourself and do not try to prove anything too early. Just the trauma of extensive surgery is exhausting, and I'm sure that you have had to run the medication gauntlet, which is another round of being assaulted.

I'd allow yourself at least a year or so to get used to the new normal before you judge what you are up to. And then focus on what you can do comfortably.

The desire is strong and it's easy to get discouraged if you get ahead of yourself.

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Twitter: @ftemoto
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11/18/2020 12:16 PM

I know we’ve argued here in the past but I just want to wish you the best, hope everything goes in the right direction and you make a full recovery as quickly as possible.

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Make Hillclimb Great Again

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11/18/2020 1:27 PM

I know its not quite the same but a couple years ago my dad who is in his 60s was diagnosed with lukemia, after going through his chemo he was put through for a stem cell transplant which had some complications and led to him being bed ridden for around 2months to the point he couldnt even stand up under his own strength, once he was fit enough to be discharged he was back riding again in less than 6months, he had to take it steady for a bit as he couldnt even lift his bike on and off the stand first day out.
He will tell anyone its mind over matter, stay positive and dont be scared by what the doctors say when it comes to recovery and getting back to what you love to do.
He proved doctors wrong on numerous occasions when it came to what he could do physically during his recovery.
Just dont try to do too much too quickly, i had to go pick him up in my van a few times when he got carried away trying to cycle too far before his body was strong enough 😂
After around a year and a half he was back racing again.
were now 2 years down the line and he is fitter than i am 😂.
Hope this helps man, stay positive

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11/18/2020 1:35 PM

I have zero experience, but wish you well and hope you have a speedy recovery! If you don't mind me asking, how old are you? I was told that both of those run on my moms side and that i should get a colonoscopy about 10 years sooner than normal... Sorry - not trying to derail this, was just curious.

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11/18/2020 1:41 PM

Sorry to hear that man. I cant help you because i've never had anything similar.

Tough times dont last, but tough people do.
Waiting for you at the tracks buddy😉

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11/18/2020 3:20 PM

Motox627! wrote:

I have zero experience, but wish you well and hope you have a speedy recovery! If you don't mind me asking, how old are you? I was told that both of those run on my moms side and that i should get a colonoscopy about 10 years sooner than normal... Sorry - not trying to derail this, was just curious.

I’m 52

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11/18/2020 6:26 PM

All the best man.
You’ll probably get a lot more people reading the thread and providing advice if you finish the title.

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11/18/2020 6:34 PM

I hate to hear of your health problems and wish you only the best in your recovery. If you don’t mind sharing, did you have surgery, chemo, radiation, any/all of those? Take care and get well soon.

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11/18/2020 7:30 PM

500 Mike wrote:

I hate to hear of your health problems and wish you only the best in your recovery. If you don’t mind sharing, did you have surgery, chemo, radiation, any/all of those? Take care and get well soon.

I’m doing chemo and radiation five days a week for 28 days then wait a month then they will try to remove it.

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11/18/2020 7:38 PM

I hate hearing news like this for anybody, but want you to know, that you are in my prayers. Keep up the strong fight, and stay positive! Pulling for you..... we all are.

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11/18/2020 7:45 PM

Praying for a full recovery. Though I have not experienced what you are going through, as others advised, take it slow and take care of yourself.

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11/18/2020 7:59 PM
Edited Date/Time: 11/18/2020 8:00 PM

You can beat this! Do everything your Dr recommends plus more (eat healthy, drink extra water, rest when needed, , take walks to keep active when possible, and maintain a positive attitude..etc). This was my good friend’s strategy when he went through similar to what your going through- he is back to 100%.

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11/18/2020 8:02 PM

Good luck with your treatment plan.

I am also a person that cancer didn't kill just yet. For me. The psychological impact was much bigger for me, the 80 hospital trips were a pain though lol... although my medication just left me feeling shit for 48 hours.

My advice is support for the mental side of things

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11/18/2020 8:06 PM

The guitarist in my band got colon cancer two years ago at age 44. It got really bad for him for a while. He had permanent injections in his arms and wore this medicine pump when he got out of the hospital and he was also using a colostomy bag. However he seems to be good now and is cancer free. He’s not super active so I can’t comment on the ability to get moto fit again. He has had to cut out a lot of things from his diet so that could affect training for you. He said smoking pot helped a lot with the chemo so hopefully you’re in a state where you can do that legally.
The fact that your already optimistic about 2021 makes me think you’ll be okay.
Good luck man!

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11/18/2020 9:08 PM

My uncle ~ 75 just won the battle less than a year ago after almost a year of treatment. Hormone treatment and sessions took a toll on him as he lost his strength and has morbid obesity, he had to pause to walk his stairs up. A year later he can do his lawn by himself with a half an hour break. They also before sessions put a gel permanently in the rectum wall to protect and it really save him some potential serious issues.

You got this brother!

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11/18/2020 9:25 PM

Good thoughts and prayers headed your way. No experience with this except a co worker had it at 42, same age that his Father was diagnosed with it. Radiation daily for 28 days them chemo pills then a surgery. The radiation killed off part of his intestines and they had to do a resection. He came out of it very well and is doing great 4 years later.

Be smart and listen to your Dr’s and your body it will tell you when you are doing too much. Be well

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11/19/2020 5:24 AM

You have my positive thoughts, prayers and good wishes to beat this thing, Excalibur.

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United States of America

11/19/2020 5:50 AM

Praying for the best possible outcome and to hear your moto stories in 2021!

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11/19/2020 6:27 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/19/2020 6:34 AM

I dont know how helpful this will be as far as getting back into moto after going down the path you are heading down, but i do have some family history in dealing with colon cancer.

This will be long, so before I start please, to anybody else reading this, don't be afraid of colonoscopys. Yeah, they can be a pain in the ass, but even the prep has gotten better in recent years. Please talk to your doctor and get one when he recommends, especially if you have risk factors.

My dad was 73 and kind of old school and hadn't been to Dr in probably 15 years. He calls me one night and asks me to to come get him and take him to the er, which told me it was something serious. He lived 20 miles away, so I asked him if I should call an ambulance because there is a station a mile away. He said no, his stomach was really hurting, and he had locked the gate on his driveway and didn't want them cutting the lock.

I went and picked him up and took him to the er. We are there for a couple hours and his discomfort is obvious and getting worse. They take him for some tests and then a surgeon comes in and tells me that my father's bowel has ruptured and he is being rushed to surgery, and at this point it was 50/50, and the danger of septic infection was the biggest danger.

He spent 5 weeks in ICU fighting every organ system shutdown there is, and finally started turning the corner. I was concerned then because he seemed to be suffering from dimentia. I went to see him one day and he begged me to just take him home. I explained that he was in an ICU unit and he couldn't even get around by himself. He looks at me, and then tells me that all I need to do is bring the old schwinn exercise bike off his back porch up there and he will start riding it so he can go the hell home.

The dr then explained that the dimentia was from sleep deprivation because in an ICU a patient never gets any good sleep. Weird huh?

Anyway, dad does a round of chemo, improves, gets out, gets active, has the colostomy bag removed, has a hip replaced and 5 years after er visit seems to be doing well. I move 2 hours and am not able to see him as often.

He passes away. Going through his stuff I find pictures from a colonoscopy that shows probable tumors that had come back. He aparantly just decided he wasn't going through all that crap again and was taking otc pain meds, including a lot of aspirin, and best guess is started bleeding internally and that was it.

So that is one parent.

3 months after he passes we have Xmas dinner at my brothers house. After dinner mom gathers us all together and tells us that she had a colonoscopy and that they had found cancer and had wanted to schedule surgery for 12/26, but she told them she didn't want to do the pre-op cleanse on Christmas day and had scheduled it for 12/31.

They did the surgery and she did a round of chemo as a precaution. The chemo had nasty side effects with her hands and feet that had a chance of being permenant but eventually they went away. 5 years later she is religious about follow up tests.

At 79, she is back driving around the country in her Chinook rv by herself, including climbing up the ladder to get to rooftop storage bins, which ages me. When she was in the hospital we made a pact that I would skydive with her when she turned 80. A couple weeks ago she informed me that she had decided that she had gotten to do so many things since her diagnosis, including 2 rv trips to the west coast, that she was no longer needing to skydive. I was relieved because at 290 lbs I had some concerns about following through, and maybe being able to find someone that would tandem jump with me strapped on.

I am sorry if I got long winded and maybe a bit off topic. Every case is so different and it looks like the most important thing is catching it early.

It sounds like you did, and have a good chance at a full recovery. Please update your journey and let us know when you are back riding.

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11/19/2020 7:22 AM

You'll be around for a long time to tell us all.

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11/19/2020 10:03 AM

Excaliburbmx wrote:

Well a few months ago I was diagnosed with colon and rectal cancer. I didn’t ride much dirt this year because of pain and fatigue but now I’m trying to get optimistic for 2021.
Who has been through this and I know the timetables are varied but after you healed up did you regain enough
strength and enjoy riding?

I went from 215lbs to 169 and strength is lacking. I’m plannOmg on a lot of gym time next year.

Mate, my sympathies. As a guy who works in a cancer clinic, and has had some early anxiety over colon issues this hits close to home. It is obviously different for everyone, but I have seen a couple of people in our local cycling community come through hell and back with colon cancer and get back to good levels of fitness. I think the most important thing to remember in your recovery is to not timeline anything. By that I mean, push forward and make sure your medical team understand your desire to push forward, but be prepared for potential setbacks. Setting arbitrary timelines early on is very dangerous, because it means if you have any setbacks you may end up getting frustrated or depressed that you are not meeting your personal timelines.

Man, I wish you the best in your recovery. Cancer sucks. F*ck Cancer.

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Old MXer turned Superfan.

11/19/2020 10:14 AM

JustMX wrote:

I dont know how helpful this will be as far as getting back into moto after going down the path you are heading down, but i do have some family history in dealing with colon cancer.

This will be long, so before I start please, to anybody else reading this, don't be afraid of colonoscopys. Yeah, they can be a pain in the ass, but even the prep has gotten better in recent years. Please talk to your doctor and get one when he recommends, especially if you have risk factors.

My dad was 73 and kind of old school and hadn't been to Dr in probably 15 years. He calls me one night and asks me to to come get him and take him to the er, which told me it was something serious. He lived 20 miles away, so I asked him if I should call an ambulance because there is a station a mile away. He said no, his stomach was really hurting, and he had locked the gate on his driveway and didn't want them cutting the lock.

I went and picked him up and took him to the er. We are there for a couple hours and his discomfort is obvious and getting worse. They take him for some tests and then a surgeon comes in and tells me that my father's bowel has ruptured and he is being rushed to surgery, and at this point it was 50/50, and the danger of septic infection was the biggest danger.

He spent 5 weeks in ICU fighting every organ system shutdown there is, and finally started turning the corner. I was concerned then because he seemed to be suffering from dimentia. I went to see him one day and he begged me to just take him home. I explained that he was in an ICU unit and he couldn't even get around by himself. He looks at me, and then tells me that all I need to do is bring the old schwinn exercise bike off his back porch up there and he will start riding it so he can go the hell home.

The dr then explained that the dimentia was from sleep deprivation because in an ICU a patient never gets any good sleep. Weird huh?

Anyway, dad does a round of chemo, improves, gets out, gets active, has the colostomy bag removed, has a hip replaced and 5 years after er visit seems to be doing well. I move 2 hours and am not able to see him as often.

He passes away. Going through his stuff I find pictures from a colonoscopy that shows probable tumors that had come back. He aparantly just decided he wasn't going through all that crap again and was taking otc pain meds, including a lot of aspirin, and best guess is started bleeding internally and that was it.

So that is one parent.

3 months after he passes we have Xmas dinner at my brothers house. After dinner mom gathers us all together and tells us that she had a colonoscopy and that they had found cancer and had wanted to schedule surgery for 12/26, but she told them she didn't want to do the pre-op cleanse on Christmas day and had scheduled it for 12/31.

They did the surgery and she did a round of chemo as a precaution. The chemo had nasty side effects with her hands and feet that had a chance of being permenant but eventually they went away. 5 years later she is religious about follow up tests.

At 79, she is back driving around the country in her Chinook rv by herself, including climbing up the ladder to get to rooftop storage bins, which ages me. When she was in the hospital we made a pact that I would skydive with her when she turned 80. A couple weeks ago she informed me that she had decided that she had gotten to do so many things since her diagnosis, including 2 rv trips to the west coast, that she was no longer needing to skydive. I was relieved because at 290 lbs I had some concerns about following through, and maybe being able to find someone that would tandem jump with me strapped on.

I am sorry if I got long winded and maybe a bit off topic. Every case is so different and it looks like the most important thing is catching it early.

It sounds like you did, and have a good chance at a full recovery. Please update your journey and let us know when you are back riding.

I just want to second JustMX here on the colonoscopies. Having a lot of colon issues on my mother's side (cancer, Crohns, UC, etc) led me to get a colonoscopy at age 48 when I started having some GI issues. The scope was really nothing, honestly the prep at home is way worse than the procedure. It is absolutely the best screening tool, and unfortunately colon cancer is this silent f*cking beast that can be winning a battle one does not even know is going on. So by all means, all of us over the age of 40 (IMO) should be talking to our doctors about risks and we should not be afraid to be screened.

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Old MXer turned Superfan.

11/19/2020 10:44 AM

Agree, prep is the worst part and that doesn't even hurt

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11/19/2020 2:51 PM

My wife had it and went through surgery and chemo/radiation. She was at stage 4 and survived. No cancer today and that was about ten years ago. It took her around three years to regain her physical condition and some things are still a problem but with check ups showing her cancer free year after year she is now confident it is unlikely to return. I wish you well dealing with this.

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11/19/2020 3:27 PM
Edited Date/Time: 11/19/2020 3:33 PM

Sorry to hear about your diagnosis. I’m rooting for you man!!! Lots of positive takeaways already from this thread.

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Are you smart enough to buy a bike that costs less, weighs less, makes more horsepower per cubic centimeter, can be rebuilt for recycled aluminum can money and is giggle inducing? It is hard to believe that the American riding public flunks this test en masse. How stupid are you?

11/19/2020 5:21 PM

EngIceDave wrote:

Agree, prep is the worst part and that doesn't even hurt

Yep, the prep is god awful. I’m only 33 but I have Lynch Syndrome so I’ve been getting colonoscopies every two years since I was 25. You’re so sedated during the actual procedure you don’t know what’s going on.

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11/19/2020 7:16 PM

I will keep you in my prayers. Keep looking forward and positive thoughts

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Thanks for your Support
BBTMX, 100%, Mobius, O'Neal, ProTaper, Yoshimura, Beck's Tech Suspension and Tuning

11/20/2020 9:42 AM

Exaliburbmx,

In October of 2015, I was diagnosed with Stage 4 Colorectal Cancer (Adenocarcinoma) with metathesis to the liver. Being a 36 y/o and relatively healthy I never expected such a thing to happen to me, no one does (I do not have lynch syndrome (Colon cancer - precursor)). My outlook was not good, I was given some odds that would make you fall to your knees. It took about a month before the doctors even starting treating my cancer which began with chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil w/avastin). I would do 3-day treatments once every two weeks. This started a cycle of treatments, surgeries, rest, treatments, surgeries, etc. for the next two years. I'll spare you the colon details but you can imagine - they took a piece that said "You have plenty of time" and hooked it up to the end piece that said, "It's beyond way too late". They removed everything from the exit on up (About 2') along with a 1/3 of my liver.

Now, here's the good part - I'm writing this. I was able to start riding again in 2017. The chemo was a pain to remove from my system and it took a long time (still suffer side effects). You'll be able to ride again and you'll know when. Test the waters when your feeling good. The hardest part about coming back is the effects of chemo and the physical changes to your body. I relate it to trying to heal from a concussion and suffering from PCS, I would get loopy when my heart rate got above a certain rate.

I have some good friends and an amazing wife (SN) who got me through very dark times during my treatments. Keep your head up and PM me if you or anyone has any questions that they don't want to ask in public.

In 2016, I had my first major surgery (of many) at UCI. My room overlooked Anaheim stadium. It was (I think) the week of A2 and to my shock, the Musquin's and RD and LD came and visited me while I was recovering. Very cool to say the least. I was in too much pain and pretty high to even be concerned with attending the supercross but I was able to watch the race on my IPad. Then this happened (Listen to the video);



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