Which beginner mx bike.

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8/2/2017 9:26 AM

After weeks and weeks of research, I'm still unable to decide on a bike.
I've been trail riding for over a year, but want to do motocross.
Is a 250 2 stroke too much for a newer rider?
Is there maybe a more tamed 250 2T out there that would suit me better? Like a cr250 or yz250?
I initially wanted a ktm 250sx, but I'm kinda over the whole ktm thing already, people sell them for way too much.
(my budget is $2,500-$3,000)
I just want a reliable machine that isn't going to kill me.
And that's another thing.. people keep telling me about breaking bones on certain bikes, like the 250sx, which is why I'm starting to get apprehensive about that particular bike and 2 strokes in general.
Should I just get over the 250 2T thing and stick with a 4 stroke mx bike? More reliable but more expensive to rebuild from what I hear.

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8/2/2017 9:42 AM

If you have to ask, there's your sign. You need a 125 if you are going to go 2T. There's no such thing as a "more tame 250 2T motocross bike". They're all going to have a ton of hit. You seriously have people telling you that you're more likely to break bones on "certain bikes", as in certain brands? If so, do yourself a favor and never take moto advice from these people.

Also, KTM's carry a premium price for a reason. Granted, I ride orange so I may be biased, but the resale value on KTM's is indeed much better than the japanese bikes.

If you really want a 250F thumper, make darn sure you aren't buying a clapped out one.

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Positively, absolutely 110% obsessed with anything MOTO.

8/2/2017 9:46 AM

CR500. Enjoy.

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8/2/2017 9:50 AM

This is a great bike to get your feet wet on.

Photo

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8/2/2017 10:14 AM

You can tame a 250 two-stroke down by adding a flywheel weight along with a few other things. If you are competent on the bike then I think a 250 is easier to ride than a 125 because it has enough torque to lug the motor around corners more than a 125. I don't know what your skill level is though so I can't recommend a bike. I will say that you can have plenty of fun learning on a motocross track with a trail bike despite what some people on here may say.

What bike have you been trail riding on?

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8/2/2017 10:27 AM

More info needed on your size, height and weight.

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8/2/2017 10:59 AM

2006 and later YZ 250 is a good bike. Can always move powerband around with a more trail oriented pipe.

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8/2/2017 11:02 AM

Maybe it's time to start looking at quads....
They may come with a lifestyle change though.

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8/2/2017 11:04 AM

Ultimately your control of your throttle hand will dictate how safe or unsafe you are. Ride out of control with the throttle pinned on a TTR125 and you'll visit the ER much sooner than being really careful on a CR500.

If you've already been riding for a year, are average or above in size, and can "engage the brain" while riding at the track, a 250 2-stroke will work great. If you really want to work on technique, pick up a 125. Above all- have fun.

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8/2/2017 11:16 AM

scooter5002 wrote:

CR500. Enjoy.

+1 on the CR.

Because they're old they're much less powerful than the modern bikes.

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8/2/2017 11:26 AM

125 two stroke, or 250f period. You will thank us latter.

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8/2/2017 11:35 AM

TXDirt wrote:

This is a great bike to get your feet wet on.

Photo

Also an excellent choice. The added bonus to these bikes, you'll be able to see a lot of planes flying, while you ride. Robgvx also makes a great point, and as an ex-pro racer, he knows his stuff.

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8/2/2017 11:44 AM

Someday, you guys are going to convince some poor newbie to buy a KX500, and it will tear his arms off and beat him to death with them. ermm

OP, you should get a 125 or a 150 2 stroke. Since you are buying used, you can afford to re-sell it if it doesn't have enough power. Plus, it will enable you to build skills without being too dangerous. The only reason I'd recommend anything else is if you weight over 200 pounds.... in that case, look at a 250F or maybe a 250 2 stroke.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

8/2/2017 11:48 AM

Falcon wrote:

Someday, you guys are going to convince some poor newbie to buy a KX500, and it will tear his arms off and beat him to death with them. ermm

OP, you should get a 125 or a 150 2 stroke. Since you are buying used, you can afford to re-sell it if it doesn't have enough power. Plus, it will enable you to build skills without being too dangerous. The only reason I'd recommend anything else is if you weight over 200 pounds.... in that case, look at a 250F or maybe a 250 2 stroke.

We also encourage new riders to grow a mullet, drink copious amounts of PBR, and to wear an open face helmet while learning the finer things this machine has to offer. tongue

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8/2/2017 12:06 PM

Falcon wrote:

Someday, you guys are going to convince some poor newbie to buy a KX500, and it will tear his arms off and beat him to death with them. ermm

OP, you should get a 125 or a 150 2 stroke. Since you are buying used, you can afford to re-sell it if it doesn't have enough power. Plus, it will enable you to build skills without being too dangerous. The only reason I'd recommend anything else is if you weight over 200 pounds.... in that case, look at a 250F or maybe a 250 2 stroke.

Not certain I see anything negative about your post. Well, the FIRST paragraph, anyhoo. Second one is certainly misleading.

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8/2/2017 1:07 PM

You'll probably be able to ride a 250 2 stroke, but you will also probably be tentative and uneasy about it, at least for a while (I say this from experience). Flywheel weights and pipes help but not much. If you get a 125 or 150 2 stroke, you'll be more likely to have fun and build your confidence. You'll be a better rider in the long run after learning the shifting and clutch work needed to ride a 125. And since you're buying used, you'll be able to afford to fix it if the engine blows - the same cannot be said for a 250F. I say this from experience as well. I could afford to fix my 2006 crf250 but opted to just buy a new bike instead. If you can't afford to fix or replace a blown 250f engine, don't buy a used one unless you're very sure that the engine is fairly fresh and well looked after (and when someone says it's rebuilt, receipts or it didn't happen).

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Current rides: 2016 KTM 250SXF, 2017 KTM 350SXF

8/2/2017 2:08 PM

loftyair wrote:

More info needed on your size, height and weight.

6'1", 160 lbs, lean build.

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8/2/2017 2:20 PM

Hey guys, I appreciate all the feedback, even the sarcastic ones. This forum has been a big help so far.
I think the 125 2 stroke sounds like a great idea... especially as my first ever 2 stroke bike.

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8/2/2017 2:48 PM

Jeff Ward rode the piss out of those KX500's and he is barely 5' tall. Are you a man or are you a little girl?

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8/2/2017 2:55 PM

125 actually hard for beginner to get better on. They only go fast if you already know how to go fast. You're just big enough for a 250. They last longer, and are actually easier to ride than 125. Don't have to be aggresive, yet can go fast if you want, easier.

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8/2/2017 3:18 PM

loftyair wrote:

125 actually hard for beginner to get better on. They only go fast if you already know how to go fast. You're just big enough for a 250. They last longer, and are actually easier to ride than 125. Don't have to be aggresive, yet can go fast if you want, easier.

I agree. Some people over exaggerate the 250 2-stroke, i think it's the perfect bike for a beginner. Low maintenance, not a beast like a 450 and relatively light.

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8/2/2017 3:45 PM

You've say you've been trail riding for over a year....on what bike?
How far are you planning on jumping?
Is it vital that you make it to work on Monday?

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2019 KTM 350 XCF
Single Track Warrior



8/2/2017 3:57 PM

Beginner should learn to ride first, get a Yamaha YZ 125. Reliable, good bike for a beginner.

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8/2/2017 4:17 PM

loftyair wrote:

125 actually hard for beginner to get better on. They only go fast if you already know how to go fast. You're just big enough for a 250. They last longer, and are actually easier to ride than 125. Don't have to be aggresive, yet can go fast if you want, easier.

Motofinne wrote:

I agree. Some people over exaggerate the 250 2-stroke, i think it's the perfect bike for a beginner. Low maintenance, not a beast like a 450 and relatively light.

See, I think a 250 is far more a beast than a 450F. It may not have as much power, but it all comes on at once instead of in a linear curve, like a 4-stroke.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

8/2/2017 4:26 PM

loftyair wrote:

125 actually hard for beginner to get better on. They only go fast if you already know how to go fast. You're just big enough for a 250. They last longer, and are actually easier to ride than 125. Don't have to be aggresive, yet can go fast if you want, easier.

Motofinne wrote:

I agree. Some people over exaggerate the 250 2-stroke, i think it's the perfect bike for a beginner. Low maintenance, not a beast like a 450 and relatively light.

Falcon wrote:

See, I think a 250 is far more a beast than a 450F. It may not have as much power, but it all comes on at once instead of in a linear curve, like a 4-stroke.

Well my 2007 RM 250 with FMF Powercore 2 silencer and fatty pipe was pretty easy and tame to ride comparing to all my 450s.

With that said, I'm experienced so i don't know how the bike would do for a beginner riding way slower.

Beginners rarely buy brand new bikes but if a person would be prepared to but a new one i would get a 250f.

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8/2/2017 7:32 PM

loftyair wrote:

125 actually hard for beginner to get better on. They only go fast if you already know how to go fast. You're just big enough for a 250. They last longer, and are actually easier to ride than 125. Don't have to be aggresive, yet can go fast if you want, easier.

Motofinne wrote:

I agree. Some people over exaggerate the 250 2-stroke, i think it's the perfect bike for a beginner. Low maintenance, not a beast like a 450 and relatively light.

I've always said this after I went from a 125 to a 250. The ability to lug it turns it into a more forgiving bike. Sure you get in to the revs it will rip but it lets you ride a gear higher and ride the pipe "softer".

Having said that if you can master a 125 it will teach you how to keep your momentum and really charge the track aggressively.

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