What happened to people fixing things.

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8/18/2020 1:31 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/18/2020 1:39 PM

I grew up understanding that if I wanted to play rough with my toys then I needed to know how to fix it. Seems like today I hear more and more about people "sending" things off to be worked on or brought to a bike shop to wait weeks for them to get to it. I understand some repairs require special, specific tools to complete and that are too expensive for the average guy to just have around. Truly, the majority of repairs on dirt bikes can be handled with basic tools and taking the time to read and learn! This definitely applies to more that motorcycles too. Seems like people are willing to exhaust too much energy complaining to a dealer or private seller about warranty loopholes or some other BS rather than directing that to actually working on the problem. You bought it, you own it, it breaks, you fix it.

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8/18/2020 1:39 PM

I agree, and you’d think with YouTube it would be the opposite. When I was a kid and my stuff broke, I had to look at it, think about it, and determine how to fix it. If I couldn’t figure it out on my own, I went and asked dad. Now days there’s literally a video tutorial on how to do ANYthing, and people still won’t do it. I get not having tools, but a lot of auto parts stores will loan tools for free with a deposit. Bring the tool back, get your money back. Or keep the tool and they keep your money.

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8/18/2020 1:45 PM

some people have careers/own their own businesses and or have to take care of a family on top of all of this.

thats why they pay people to do things they cannot do or have the time to do.

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8/18/2020 1:47 PM

I saw a Youtube tutorial on how to do knee replacement surgery. I can fix the shift shaft on my YZ250. laughing laughing laughing laughing laughing

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Braaapin' aint easy.

8/18/2020 1:50 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/18/2020 1:51 PM

So I wanted to change the sprockets and chain on my 2020 KX450, impossible to get the front sprocket off on my own! Had to take it to the shop, it wouldn’t budge

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8/18/2020 1:51 PM

SEE ARE125 wrote:

I agree, and you’d think with YouTube it would be the opposite. When I was a kid and my stuff broke, I had to look at it, think about it, and determine how to fix it. If I couldn’t figure it out on my own, I went and asked dad. Now days there’s literally a video tutorial on how to do ANYthing, and people still won’t do it. I get not having tools, but a lot of auto parts stores will loan tools for free with a deposit. Bring the tool back, get your money back. Or keep the tool and they keep your money.

No doubt! Youtube will walk you through almost anything without reading a sentence! Tools are an investment. My dad still uses the same tools and tool chest he had from college and he is nearly 70 now. Less than $500 in tools will save thousands in shop labor. I know shops have to make money too but dang, around me shop labor is like $85/hr. That's nuts, but people keep bringing their stuff so supply and demand kicks in.

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8/18/2020 1:55 PM

kkawboy14 wrote:

So I wanted to change the sprockets and chain on my 2020 KX450, impossible to get the front sprocket off on my own! Had to take it to the shop, it wouldn’t budge

It's not impossible that's the thing! Go buy a 3 pack set of 3 jaw pullers from Harbor Freight for $19.99 and get that sprocket off!

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8/18/2020 1:56 PM

kkawboy14 wrote:

So I wanted to change the sprockets and chain on my 2020 KX450, impossible to get the front sprocket off on my own! Had to take it to the shop, it wouldn’t budge

Go buy an electric impact wrench and some impact sockets. Won't have to go to dealer for that again.

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8/18/2020 1:58 PM

vtec wrote:

some people have careers/own their own businesses and or have to take care of a family on top of all of this.

thats why they pay people to do things they cannot do or have the time to do.

This is valid too. If you don't mind paying, you are supporting the people who repair for a living.

As for me, I'd rather save the $75 or more per hour.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

8/18/2020 1:59 PM

kkawboy14 wrote:

So I wanted to change the sprockets and chain on my 2020 KX450, impossible to get the front sprocket off on my own! Had to take it to the shop, it wouldn’t budge

jamiechapman418 wrote:

It's not impossible that's the thing! Go buy a 3 pack set of 3 jaw pullers from Harbor Freight for $19.99 and get that sprocket off!

The nut wouldn’t come off, the sprocket slides on and off easily.

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8/18/2020 2:00 PM

kkawboy14 wrote:

So I wanted to change the sprockets and chain on my 2020 KX450, impossible to get the front sprocket off on my own! Had to take it to the shop, it wouldn’t budge

SmokinJoe439 wrote:

Go buy an electric impact wrench and some impact sockets. Won't have to go to dealer for that again.

I had considered that but figured for $20 they can take it off once and then I can do it after that!

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8/18/2020 2:02 PM

kkawboy14 wrote:

So I wanted to change the sprockets and chain on my 2020 KX450, impossible to get the front sprocket off on my own! Had to take it to the shop, it wouldn’t budge

jamiechapman418 wrote:

It's not impossible that's the thing! Go buy a 3 pack set of 3 jaw pullers from Harbor Freight for $19.99 and get that sprocket off!

kkawboy14 wrote:

The nut wouldn’t come off, the sprocket slides on and off easily.

So the shop had some magic dust? Or did they struggle with penetrating oil, sprocket holder, impact maybe, and some time?

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8/18/2020 2:04 PM

You just do it! you struggle a bit, learn a lot, and when you come across the same problem again (which you will) its a non issue

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8/18/2020 2:10 PM

I see both sides of it. My parents were both white collar office jobs. There were things, like mechanic'ing, that they paid for as they didn't have time or resources (and no youtube!) Thus I didn't learn how to do any of that.

Fast forward 42 years and I think my favorite 'hobby' is working on my bike and my sons bike. My wife often says she thinks I enjoy building them more than I do riding them (doesn't hurt as bad to fall off my roller chair...). It's incredibly rewarding for me to take it down to the frame and rebuild and most recently I've started in on motor work. Best feeling ever when that bike actually starts and runs properly after I've torn it apart! If you knew me, you'd be impressed.laughing

It's a confidence builder, even at 42 years old. And thanks to the toolbox thread, I'm currently shopping for a new roller toolbox to keep adding tools to!

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8/18/2020 2:13 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/18/2020 2:14 PM

jamiechapman418 wrote:

It's not impossible that's the thing! Go buy a 3 pack set of 3 jaw pullers from Harbor Freight for $19.99 and get that sprocket off!

kkawboy14 wrote:

The nut wouldn’t come off, the sprocket slides on and off easily.

jamiechapman418 wrote:

So the shop had some magic dust? Or did they struggle with penetrating oil, sprocket holder, impact maybe, and some time?

I didn’t want to purchase an impact to remove 1 but, 1 time in my life.
I do own a chain breaker, metric threading kit, and a torque spoke wrench if that helps!

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8/18/2020 2:15 PM

And I own one of these (I can afford an impact gun if I want one):

Photo

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8/18/2020 2:24 PM

Kawi gets every fastener piss tight at the factory. Just getting the front axle nut undone on my kx450 was a challenge.

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8/18/2020 2:25 PM

It goes both ways, but shops are vital to our industry. More kids my age are going to mechanical or technical institutes and get jobs after their apprenticeship. Both my roommate and I were going to college, me for marketing/business and him for engineering and math. Some of the most fun we had was rebuilding or working on our bikes in the garage. Our other roommate however said he will never do bike work. He takes his bike to the shop for everything and we don't care or give him grief about it because his priorities are focused on his career and playing guitar. If you can afford it and don't want to do the work, who cares. To the OP, I get it, but that's the way things are now. You can get upset or wave your finger at millennial's, but lets honest the only person that is getting upset is yourself. You are never going to change someones perspective on bike work unless they are open minded. But for the kids that didn't hold the flashlight for their dad growing up, it's probably safer they take their bike to the shop lol.

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8/18/2020 2:28 PM

I fix things for a living if everyone fixed their own shit i’d be out of a job.... in saying that I could fix my own bikes but love supporting my local one man bike shop.... I Love supporting local where and when I can.

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8/18/2020 2:32 PM

I’m in both camps in a way, I maintain my car, van, wife’s car, house (barring electrical work) and other day to day tasks like everyone else (kids work blah blah), but my bike weird as it sounds I only want to ride it. I’d rather drop it off, pick it up ready to rip and enjoy it on the track. To some it may sound lazy, to me it’s a product of working hard to not have to do the jobs you don’t want to or don’t have time to do.

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8/18/2020 2:42 PM

As a boat owner I’m learning you: pay a lot for service, wait forever for a qualified tech, or both. So I fix what I can.

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8/18/2020 2:44 PM

vtec wrote:

some people have careers/own their own businesses and or have to take care of a family on top of all of this.

thats why they pay people to do things they cannot do or have the time to do.

Falcon wrote:

This is valid too. If you don't mind paying, you are supporting the people who repair for a living.

As for me, I'd rather save the $75 or more per hour.

But if you made $80 an hour at work, then would it be worth letting an expert do it? I do all my own work but sometimes I wonder if it’s worth spending a ton of time learning to do something complex that I will only do a handful of times versus taking it to someone who’s done it a thousand times.

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8/18/2020 2:49 PM

I do most everything on the bike except split cases. I leave that to the pro.

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8/18/2020 2:53 PM

As a kid my parents had zero interest in bikes let alone working on them. So I had a lot of hard lessons in my youth. At 46 years old my time is more valuable to me then the money spent wasted working on stuff. I guess it’s perspective.
I also dont “enjoy” the challenge like I once did. I can see why wealthy individuals pay to have yard work, Home repairs, & car/motorcycles serviced.

Ghost

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8/18/2020 2:57 PM

About the only thing I haven’t done is a shock service. Although i have serviced some rear shocks on my mountain bikes. Plus gearboxes and head gaskets in cars and 4x4’s. And I usually enjoy it. BUT i don’t always choose to do it as often there are other priorities.

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8/18/2020 3:10 PM

At first its a bit intimidating but once go for it, it isnt that bad. I had only done minor bolt ons to my bikes but now Im knee deep into a cr125 build. Its been a challenge and a lot of fun but also put a dent in my wallet for tools that were needed. Those will last far beyond this project but still a hurdle from the get-go.

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2015 YZ250F - 2003 CR125R

8/18/2020 3:19 PM

I learned the hard way.

As a teenager, I had an old XR that I wanted to fix up. Bought a big bore kit and sent it to the local dealer for rebuild. Paid $1400. That was pretty much my entire summer earnings, but I was happy to have it done right.

When I got it back, the cam chain tensioner wasn’t installed correctly. I took it back and they fixed it.

Got it back the second time and it just didn’t run like it should. I pulled the valve cover and found the cam was advanced one tooth and the cam sprocket was on backwards, causing the cam chain to rub on the head.

At that point I realized this dealer was worthless. Pulled it apart myself and went through the top end, correcting their errors along the way.

I was 14 at the time and have never taken a bike to a shop since.

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8/18/2020 3:24 PM

I can fix things. My dad's a tv repairman, he has the ultimate set of tools!

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8/18/2020 3:39 PM

The value of time - the eternal struggle!

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8/18/2020 3:48 PM

All depends on the person.

For me I enjoy working on things, learning how it works, tinkering, engineering parts, throwing away good parts assuming they were the issue...haha

My buddy on the other hand, has more debt than he can afford, and more time on his hands than me, but he will drive his bike 30 mins to a shop, and charge his credit card to get the tires changed.

We all funny.

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