Trouble with ruts

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2/29/2020 5:24 PM

Hey guys, recently built this sweet rut in my little paddock track on our property to gets some practice with ruts as I’ve never really been able to get them right. I usually just take the outside line on our local tracks and never really felt comfortable going in those deep ruts. But I’ve been having some trouble with the rut and it’s really bugging me because I just end up getting shot outside the rut or I tip the bike over. Any tips on hitting the ruts would be nice.
I ride a 19 125SX and I’m 15 years old, I’ve only had the 125 for a month.

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2/29/2020 6:37 PM

Ride slow, concentrate on good form (elbows up, foot out by the front axle, sitting at the front of the seat,) and see how low you can lean it over. Repeat a million times and you'll be better at ruts than anyone.

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Braaapin' aint easy.

2/29/2020 6:50 PM

Trust the lean.
Don't be afraid to tip in.

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Go for it! Don't let a little thing like fear, or common sense hold you back.

2/29/2020 6:52 PM

If the ruts are on a straight, look pretty far ahead of you. Let the bike track in the rut by itself. Lots of people look straight down close to the front wheel and that is what screws you up.

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The poster formerly known as Sir Roostsalot.

2/29/2020 6:56 PM

Nairb#70 wrote:

If the ruts are on a straight, look pretty far ahead of you. Let the bike track in the rut by itself. Lots of people look ...more

Good point.
I assumed the rut was in a turn given his description.

If that's right, get your braking done in the straight, and lean in and accelerate. If you back off, it straightens you up and out of the rut.

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Go for it! Don't let a little thing like fear, or common sense hold you back.

2/29/2020 7:04 PM

I agree with the above with the addition of being on the throttle as early as possibly. It’s a lot easier to go through a rut when you’re on the gas. Going from braking to coasting to throttle is a lot of chassis pitch.

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2/29/2020 7:21 PM

Nairb#70 wrote:

If the ruts are on a straight, look pretty far ahead of you. Let the bike track in the rut by itself. Lots of people look ...more

The rut is on a corner

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2/29/2020 7:22 PM

Nairb#70 wrote:

If the ruts are on a straight, look pretty far ahead of you. Let the bike track in the rut by itself. Lots of people look ...more

SEEMEFIRST wrote:

Good point.
I assumed the rut was in a turn given his description.

If that's right, get your braking done in the straight, ...more

Yeah I set up and sit down at the end of the straight

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2/29/2020 9:29 PM

Is getting in the powerband messing with you? What’s your body position look like? Suspension feel pretty good? Get up towards the tank on your seat, and look where you want to go, not at your wheel. Most important, keep practicing! I work on sections later in the day.

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2/29/2020 9:38 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/29/2020 9:39 PM

If you can, find an instructor that teaches flat track. I learned so much from Danny Walker's Supercamp.

Not sure what's available in your area but in the States there are some pretty good options.

It helps you learn how to control the bike with your legs, trust the lean of the bike, and helps you find the balance point which translates to riding ruts.

All the advice above is really good, plus you can never go wrong with a refresher course on fundamentals.

I might suggest a figure 8 turn track as well. This is another awesome way to learn how to corner and ride ruts.

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2/29/2020 11:31 PM

Taylor415 wrote:

Is getting in the powerband messing with you? What’s your body position look like? Suspension feel pretty good? Get up towards ...more

I’d usually stay below the powerband because it’s really really dry up there lately and the bike just seems to slide out if I lean too much and give it too much. Getting some rain now so it should be a little better soon. I’m actively trying to stay almost on the tank and keeping my elbows nice and square. My suspension is stock as far as I know but I only weigh 60kg so I think It Might be a little stiff but I don’t feel like there’s a problem. I take it slow and only in 2nd gear with lower revs below the powerband.

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2/29/2020 11:40 PM

Zaugg wrote:

If you can, find an instructor that teaches flat track. I learned so much from Danny Walker's Supercamp.

Not sure what's ...more

There is a couple good coaches and also a mx club near our land down the south coast of south aus which have coaches there and they have a coaching session soon so I will be attending that. After that if I feel like I don’t have a grasp of all the basics including ruts I’m gonna do a 1 on 1 with an ex mx champion. I’m still a beginner in mx and would really be able to use those classes.

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3/1/2020 12:06 AM

Set up some figure 8 and little oval turn tracks going both directions, and just keep doing it until you're smooth and never bobble.

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Cheers, Crush
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3/1/2020 2:24 AM

Dom_Cassar wrote:

Hey guys, recently built this sweet rut in my little paddock track on our property to gets some practice with ruts as I’ve ...more

There is no substitute for hours and hours of seat time.

Go ride badly rutted trails over and over...and learn the body english required to ride ruts fast while standing. I am not even talking about rutted turns.....just learning how to ride a rut and keep the bike tracking is a required skill. Once you get to the point that you can ride straight line ruts and trail ruts fast without even being nervous, you will find that corner ruts come much easier...and you will start to love them BUT YOU HAVE TO PUT IN THE WORK first.

Another trick I had on my practice track was to build "half ruts" What the heck is that you say. It is a short berm...that is nearly VERTICAL...that is only about 6-8" tall. It rides just like a rut, but is a LOT more forgiving if you high side. When you ride a short vert berm like this right...the technique is pretty much the same as riding a rut. It is just psychologically a lot easier to charge it and develop the required nervous system memory to internalize the skill....

Basically I make a small (height) berm with a long shallow slope on the backside, water and compact it, then cut the riding side with a shovel, to nearly vertical and ride it in. The shallow easy slope on the back side allows you ride out of it without high siding.

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3/1/2020 3:08 AM

Dom_Cassar wrote:

Hey guys, recently built this sweet rut in my little paddock track on our property to gets some practice with ruts as I’ve ...more

StartedTooLate wrote:

There is no substitute for hours and hours of seat time.

Go ride badly rutted trails over and over...and learn the body ...more

I think I’ve made something very similar to that, I’ve made it about 10 cm high and cut pretty much vertical with a shovel down and then dug our the inside of the rut so it’s not so much of a V shape rut it’s more of an L shaped rut with the bottom of the L shape on the inside of the rut.

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3/1/2020 6:17 AM

Zaugg wrote:

If you can, find an instructor that teaches flat track. I learned so much from Danny Walker's Supercamp.

Not sure what's ...more

Yeah, definitely FIRST do whatever you can ... classes, one on one coaching, whatever ... so that you get the right technique down. Then practice, practice, practice. If you do a ton of practicing with bad technique, you’ll only be teaching yourself how to ride with bad technique. The more of that you do, the harder it will be to learn how to do the ruts the right way. Regardless, don’t get frustrated and have fun!

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3/1/2020 7:54 AM

Nairb#70 wrote:

If the ruts are on a straight, look pretty far ahead of you. Let the bike track in the rut by itself. Lots of people look ...more

SEEMEFIRST wrote:

Good point.
I assumed the rut was in a turn given his description.

If that's right, get your braking done in the straight, ...more

Dom_Cassar wrote:

Yeah I set up and sit down at the end of the straight

Don’t sit down that early, stand as long as you can. Sitting down and putting your leg out should be one fluid motion and shouldn’t start until you are basically at or slightly in the rut, and you should also be done with your braking at this point. just go very slow to begin with and practice not dabbing your foot, slowly increasing speed over time. Hard, dry ruts are tough though, I struggle with them as well.

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Make Hillclimb Great Again

Ratbeach Racing

Instagram / YouTube: @485Josh

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3/1/2020 7:56 AM

On the 125 adjust the power valve to 1 3/4 turns in from all the way out. That will help with your throttle control and adjust when the power valve opens up and makes pulling out of corners much easier with less clutch.

Also for the KTM drag the front brake through the turn. They like to try and climb out of the rut and this helps a lot. Don’t go crazy, you just need light pressure on the lever to drag it some. To much and you’ll lay it down. You can also get a ride engineering steering damper bracket and the showa steering damper as that helps a lot too.

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2018 KTM 250sx
Instagram CamaroAJ

3/1/2020 7:58 AM

Just keep hitting it.

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3/1/2020 11:32 AM

Drag your front brake in rutted corners. I heard Villopoto say that once and it changed my life. I just rest my index finger on the lever and it seems to do the trick.

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3/1/2020 11:36 AM

In addition to what's already been mentioned, weight the outside peg.

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3/1/2020 12:12 PM

RC4 is the easiest to find text book pictures of how to handle ruts. He was one of the best I’ve ever seen at them. Finger on the clutch, weighted outside peg on the ball of his foot, head tilted closer to level and looking ahead, foot up and far out, elbows in an attack position.

Sometimes it’s easier to learn by seeing a picture. Having someone take pictures of you so that you can actually see what you’re doing and not what you think you’re doing goes a long way and you can compare to the pros. Photo

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2018 KTM 250sx
Instagram CamaroAJ

3/1/2020 12:40 PM

Try to be smooth. Stand up when you enter the corner and sit down in the rut. Try to keep your finger off the clutch and just navigate it through the rut with constant throttle. Don't be afraid to lean it over. If you don't you'll always pop out the rut.

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3/1/2020 2:06 PM

Ryno posts a lot of good videos on his Instagram about technique and how to:
https://instagram.com/rynoglobal?igshid=f27gpk2bn4i3

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3/1/2020 2:26 PM

SEEMEFIRST wrote:

Good point.
I assumed the rut was in a turn given his description.

If that's right, get your braking done in the straight, ...more

Dom_Cassar wrote:

Yeah I set up and sit down at the end of the straight

JM485 wrote:

Don’t sit down that early, stand as long as you can. Sitting down and putting your leg out should be one fluid motion and ...more

Has anyone got any tips for getting used to standing up while on the power? Not too comfortable going as fast as I do sitting when standing feels sort of awkward.

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3/1/2020 3:22 PM

Lots of reps! On practice days, go thru them even if it is slower. Practice using your clutch thru them to be smooth. It will come to you.

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3/2/2020 2:31 AM

Has anyone got any tips for getting used to standing up while on the power? Not too comfortable going as fast as I do sitting when standing feels sort of awkward. Would really be able to use some advice with this too!!

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3/2/2020 3:19 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/2/2020 3:21 AM

Here’s the most important thing.

Power makes the bike stand up. Deceleration/braking makes the bike fall lower to the inside.

If you’re too low apply power to pick the bike up more vertical and drive further into the berm to the outside.

Deceleration/ braking makes the bike drop lower into the turn. People telling you to drag the brakes in turns are missing the point of WHY you (sometimes) need to do that. That’s a corrective manoeuvre to cure a high-side situation and stop you riding over the berm, not a ‘how to corner’ technique. Dragging brakes won’t help if you’re low-siding. It’ll only make it worse.

You use a combination of both to steer the motorcycle.

And in ruts try to lean WITH the bike. That enables you to also use body English EITHER way to lower, or raise the bike to follow the berm/rut. If you lean the bike and keep your body more vertical (which is fine in flat corners) then you can’t lean it any more if you need to.


Photo

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3/2/2020 5:25 AM

Dom_Cassar wrote:

Has anyone got any tips for getting used to standing up while on the power? Not too comfortable going as fast as I do sitting ...more

Take the seat off the bike and go ride it. That will get you standing up all over the track.

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2018 KTM 250sx
Instagram CamaroAJ

3/2/2020 6:11 AM

Don't look down into the rut and at the apex force yourself to pick that head up and look ahead. Once I started that one thing everything else got easier.

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