Training for moto - running

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7/16/2019 2:30 PM

TJMX947 wrote:

I used to love cycling but its wayyy too dangerous now. Im glad we haven't seen accidents with moto guys given that the road bike is the preferred training apparatus now. Running is hard on the joints so I have used it as a race pace type workout, 10 - 15 minutes and I'm done, the minimum effective dose is what I'm after in regard to running.

AE448 wrote:

I have to agree 100%. I bought a road bike in 2015 for MX training and at first loved it...then slowly every year I got more and more put off riding on the roads with idiot drivers. I;ve never been knocked off...never been close to it...but I've had plenty of inconsiderate drivers...and the thing that put the final tick in the box of quitting was when I was doing the washing up one day...I looked out at all the drivers going past on the road out-front...it was scary how many were looking down into their laps. Real scary how many.

Indy mxer wrote:

I have a moto buddy that got hit about a month ago road cycling. He was lucky, ended up in the hospital for a night but was just scraped and banged up. I know 2 other people who have got hit here. Our roads are ok but we don't have much shoulder along most of them.

For all you guys that love to cycle, check out the Peloton. Works the same muscles and you get an awesome cardio workout in 45 minutes. It's the real deal. If you have a Peloton store anywhere near you go in for a test ride and take a class.

And no, I don't work for them. lol

Probably the same for many of us here but I don't "mind" if I get hurt riding MX...I love it and accept the risk. If I get knocked off road riding I would mind a hell a'lot and to me it's just not worth the risk.

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7/16/2019 4:00 PM

I don't think that Pro Mx riders put as much time on bikes as everyone seem to think, of course everything is relative.
And I think that most of the time they do active recovery or fairly low intensity rides.

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7/16/2019 5:15 PM

I 1000% agree. Someone above mentioned they were an avid runner but went to a spin class and it kicked their butt. There is a huge difference between a spin class and the program the top guys use to build and maintain their fitness. I see the road bike being useful in the off season for base building purposes and for in season recovery. Right now these guys are just trying to maintain and survive these last few nationals.

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7/17/2019 3:48 AM
Edited Date/Time: 7/17/2019 3:48 AM

TJMX947 wrote:

I 1000% agree. Someone above mentioned they were an avid runner but went to a spin class and it kicked their butt. There is a huge difference between a spin class and the program the top guys use to build and maintain their fitness. I see the road bike being useful in the off season for base building purposes and for in season recovery. Right now these guys are just trying to maintain and survive these last few nationals.

We don't need to "go" to a spin class, that's the cool part. It comes to us. Obviously you didn't read my post. I simply said the Peloton bike that you see on tv is a hell of a cardio workout and uses the same muscles as cycling. Plus it's a better cardio workout if you push yourself.

And that I see why the pros use cycling in their training programs. Cycling definitely uses more muscles than running.
Btw, I wasn't comparing my workouts to what the pro's do.


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7/17/2019 4:27 AM

If yall don't listen up and buy a pelton bike, Indy Mxer going to kick yalls ass...

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7/17/2019 4:38 AM

Markee wrote:

If yall don't listen up and buy a pelton bike, Indy Mxer going to kick yalls ass...

Nah, just trying to help the guys who love to cycle but gave it up. Lot's of ways to get fit. Still love to run.
That said I'm not getting any faster on my 450. lol

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7/17/2019 6:09 AM

lumpy790 wrote:

Training in AC on a wind bike does not you in shape for high humidity and temps.

My neighbors in MD thought I was crazy running in the heat of the day in 95+ temps and 90-95% humidity in sweats & a sweat shirt but I was not fading half way though a 30 min moto like most were. I also ran sometimes in my MX boots too.

Indy mxer wrote:

I still run outdoors in the high humidity, just did last Sunday.. But the Peloton is much more than a wind bike, it's awesome low impact cardio. You should do a bit of research before you make dumb comments. Btw, your grammar needs work!

GrapeApe wrote:

How can you possibly question someone that ran in 95+ temps and 95% humidity in a sweat suit and MX boots

Right !!! I live in East Texas which in my opinion is most humid place on this planet. Well maybe Florida is too....but to run in sweats at 95 degrees and 95% humidity is suicide. Give me the Peloton any day, work smarter not harder if that's possible.

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7/17/2019 7:11 AM

miketherider wrote:

3 days a week of base running; trying to establish a pace around 75% of a target "race" pace; 2 days a week of mixed intervals or speed workouts pushing to 90% of your 5k or 10k race pace. 1 day total rest/recovery, 1 day of stretching (yoga)/pool workout/rower/bike ride/something to give your joints some rest and remain pliable.

IMO, look into training program for a 10k race. Most "average" people run in the 7:15-7:30 range, puts you into the 45 minute range of staying in that area 4 to area 5 range with your heart rate, in theory just above a moto (cardio wise). That's about all I have time for training at 4:30 every morning before work. My riding is rubish, but whenever I go to NEPG enduros or a local MX race, I always pull guys by the end of my 3rd/4th motos or make a big push on the last 2 special tests of an enduro.

Myke wrote:

Just running a 5k Tues and Thurs at my slow 10:00/mile pace helps with my motos on the weekend. I do try to ride both weekend days as well.





At that pace you are probably doing base building aka aerobic training. ANY base aerobic fitness increase will translate to better fitness on the bike. You MUST have a solid aerobic base to have any fitness for those 20 minute sprints.

Hell, the fastest mile guys run MUCH slower multiple miles to build that base fitness. The trick is, they have such good base fitness that a 6:00 mile is aerobic for them.

Every single one of us can benefit from doing aerobic training, whether that be running, swimming, or cycling. If you cannot hold a light conversation with a training partner and/or maintain that effort level for at least 30 minutes...you are not staying aerobic and burning fat for fuel, rather you are going anaerobic and burning the stored sugars in the blood and muscle. In reality we burn both fat and stored sugars, but you want to be able to burn a larger percentage of fats so that your stored fuel goes longer.

There is a reason a marathon is 26.2 miles. 20 miles is about the point your body runs out of it's stored fuel supply. The better your base fitness, the longer that stored fuel will last.

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Ironman Texas, May 17th, 2014, I became an IRONMAN.

7/17/2019 7:23 AM

miketherider wrote:

3 days a week of base running; trying to establish a pace around 75% of a target "race" pace; 2 days a week of mixed intervals or speed workouts pushing to 90% of your 5k or 10k race pace. 1 day total rest/recovery, 1 day of stretching (yoga)/pool workout/rower/bike ride/something to give your joints some rest and remain pliable.

IMO, look into training program for a 10k race. Most "average" people run in the 7:15-7:30 range, puts you into the 45 minute range of staying in that area 4 to area 5 range with your heart rate, in theory just above a moto (cardio wise). That's about all I have time for training at 4:30 every morning before work. My riding is rubish, but whenever I go to NEPG enduros or a local MX race, I always pull guys by the end of my 3rd/4th motos or make a big push on the last 2 special tests of an enduro.

Myke wrote:

Just running a 5k Tues and Thurs at my slow 10:00/mile pace helps with my motos on the weekend. I do try to ride both weekend days as well.





thephoenix wrote:

At that pace you are probably doing base building aka aerobic training. ANY base aerobic fitness increase will translate to better fitness on the bike. You MUST have a solid aerobic base to have any fitness for those 20 minute sprints.

Hell, the fastest mile guys run MUCH slower multiple miles to build that base fitness. The trick is, they have such good base fitness that a 6:00 mile is aerobic for them.

Every single one of us can benefit from doing aerobic training, whether that be running, swimming, or cycling. If you cannot hold a light conversation with a training partner and/or maintain that effort level for at least 30 minutes...you are not staying aerobic and burning fat for fuel, rather you are going anaerobic and burning the stored sugars in the blood and muscle. In reality we burn both fat and stored sugars, but you want to be able to burn a larger percentage of fats so that your stored fuel goes longer.

There is a reason a marathon is 26.2 miles. 20 miles is about the point your body runs out of it's stored fuel supply. The better your base fitness, the longer that stored fuel will last.

My guess is unfortunately with that pace is that he is in middle land, zone 3 or maybe even 4.

People don't realize how slow you have to walk/run to stay in zone 2.

I can have my pulse at 195 (95% of maxhr, 200 for me is max) for 20min in moto and my vo2max is around 58 but if I run that pace or even slower I'm ending up in high zone 3 or even low zone 4 which is not helping at all for basic aerobic training and slow twitch fibers.

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7/17/2019 7:51 AM
Edited Date/Time: 7/17/2019 7:51 AM

miketherider wrote:

3 days a week of base running; trying to establish a pace around 75% of a target "race" pace; 2 days a week of mixed intervals or speed workouts pushing to 90% of your 5k or 10k race pace. 1 day total rest/recovery, 1 day of stretching (yoga)/pool workout/rower/bike ride/something to give your joints some rest and remain pliable.

IMO, look into training program for a 10k race. Most "average" people run in the 7:15-7:30 range, puts you into the 45 minute range of staying in that area 4 to area 5 range with your heart rate, in theory just above a moto (cardio wise). That's about all I have time for training at 4:30 every morning before work. My riding is rubish, but whenever I go to NEPG enduros or a local MX race, I always pull guys by the end of my 3rd/4th motos or make a big push on the last 2 special tests of an enduro.

Myke wrote:

Just running a 5k Tues and Thurs at my slow 10:00/mile pace helps with my motos on the weekend. I do try to ride both weekend days as well.





thephoenix wrote:

At that pace you are probably doing base building aka aerobic training. ANY base aerobic fitness increase will translate to better fitness on the bike. You MUST have a solid aerobic base to have any fitness for those 20 minute sprints.

Hell, the fastest mile guys run MUCH slower multiple miles to build that base fitness. The trick is, they have such good base fitness that a 6:00 mile is aerobic for them.

Every single one of us can benefit from doing aerobic training, whether that be running, swimming, or cycling. If you cannot hold a light conversation with a training partner and/or maintain that effort level for at least 30 minutes...you are not staying aerobic and burning fat for fuel, rather you are going anaerobic and burning the stored sugars in the blood and muscle. In reality we burn both fat and stored sugars, but you want to be able to burn a larger percentage of fats so that your stored fuel goes longer.

There is a reason a marathon is 26.2 miles. 20 miles is about the point your body runs out of it's stored fuel supply. The better your base fitness, the longer that stored fuel will last.

The reason marathons are 26.2 is because that's roughly the distance from Athens to Marathon, Greece.

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7/17/2019 8:42 AM

lumpy790 wrote:

Training in AC on a wind bike does not you in shape for high humidity and temps.

My neighbors in MD thought I was crazy running in the heat of the day in 95+ temps and 90-95% humidity in sweats & a sweat shirt but I was not fading half way though a 30 min moto like most were. I also ran sometimes in my MX boots too.

Indy mxer wrote:

I still run outdoors in the high humidity, just did last Sunday.. But the Peloton is much more than a wind bike, it's awesome low impact cardio. You should do a bit of research before you make dumb comments. Btw, your grammar needs work!

Lol dam spell check but then again ... could be the low Indy humidity you are used to affecting your outcome.

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7/17/2019 8:48 AM

Naanak wrote:

One look at any pros Strava shows that his times are definitely bull. The kid said after the motos and he doesn’t even make lcqs. Just cause he says he’s pro doesn’t mean you need to defend him.

colintrax wrote:

Your reading comprehension is akin to a 5 year old. Nothing he said is bullshit so STFU noob.

novisorgajser wrote:

"Nothing he said is bullshit" how would you know... dude claims to be tired "after the Motos" meanwhile at red bud he qualified 86 out of 87. Didn't even race the lcq sounds like a huge load to me.

I was at both and would say Humidity at Red Bud was noticeably higher that it was in FL.

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7/17/2019 9:09 AM

Indy mxer wrote:

I still run outdoors in the high humidity, just did last Sunday.. But the Peloton is much more than a wind bike, it's awesome low impact cardio. You should do a bit of research before you make dumb comments. Btw, your grammar needs work!

GrapeApe wrote:

How can you possibly question someone that ran in 95+ temps and 95% humidity in a sweat suit and MX boots

Bramlett321 wrote:

Right !!! I live in East Texas which in my opinion is most humid place on this planet. Well maybe Florida is too....but to run in sweats at 95 degrees and 95% humidity is suicide. Give me the Peloton any day, work smarter not harder if that's possible.

Some riders are better in heat than others and Like in all training If you focus and train for it it shows in your performance.

Say what you want guys but I ran track in high school in the heat and humidity every day after school in Fort Meade MD

Raced MD district 7 and we had 12 A number points races were the A riders ran 2 motors of 30 min and I have always excelled passing riders that had been in front of me the last 10 minutes when they were fading fast. Oh and I often raced 2 classes too.

D7 riders typically did well at Lorettas in the heat humidity and 30 min motos

Nowadays I Wish I still was in shape like that.

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7/17/2019 1:29 PM

Brad Company wrote:

The reason marathons are 26.2 is because that's roughly the distance from Athens to Marathon, Greece.

Learn sumn new every day lol

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7/17/2019 1:41 PM
Edited Date/Time: 7/17/2019 3:33 PM

95F and 95% humidity weather conditions don't exist. You have to look at dew points for an absolute measure of the amount of water in the air.

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7/17/2019 1:50 PM

Christopher Moore wrote:

I race outdoors and honestly the last thing I would wanna do on a Monday is run. After the motos normally Sunday is just a relaxing day (normally a travel day) and on Monday I’ll go back to work (6am-7pm) then when I get off I’ll normally cycle for about an hour and half and do 30-35 miles. Tuesday I’m in the gym after work with stationary bike ride at the end, Wednesday I cycle for an hour then go the the gym, Thursday I’ll work then normally travel to the races. My program sucks because I can’t ride during the week at all but unfortunately I have to make money to get to the next race. I’m not top rider but this is what my program looks like a little bit

Naanak wrote:

Your in the wrong sport if your doing those miles in that time.

What sport are you suggesting? 35 miles in an hour in a half is good, but not crazy. I’ve done 112 miles in 5 hours and 10 min during an Ironman. Then ran 26.2 miles in 3 hours and 50 min after the bike ride.

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“Let the Good Times Roll”

7/17/2019 3:18 PM

zehn wrote:

95F and 95% humidity weather conditions don't exist. You have to look at dew points for an absolute measure of the amount of water in the air.

LOL yes that would give your heat index of: 154 F

I rode today and it was 94 and 50 percent humidity and that’s about as hot as I can go. Heat index of 103.

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7/17/2019 3:46 PM

zehn wrote:

95F and 95% humidity weather conditions don't exist. You have to look at dew points for an absolute measure of the amount of water in the air.

NeuroMaxwell wrote:

LOL yes that would give your heat index of: 154 F

I rode today and it was 94 and 50 percent humidity and that’s about as hot as I can go. Heat index of 103.

Its supposed to be like 110+ index this weekend. So a solid 120+inside my shop for work. Dreading this.

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7/17/2019 3:47 PM

zehn wrote:

95F and 95% humidity weather conditions don't exist. You have to look at dew points for an absolute measure of the amount of water in the air.

NeuroMaxwell wrote:

LOL yes that would give your heat index of: 154 F

I rode today and it was 94 and 50 percent humidity and that’s about as hot as I can go. Heat index of 103.

I know what you mean. But that's pretty stout on your part riding in those conditions.
It's 92 degrees and 59% humidity here. Heat index 100. I'm heading out for a 4 mile run knowing it will be a bitch.

I always try to run on the hottest day of the year just to show myself I can still do it. I know, not real smart.
The next few days it's going to get to mid 90's here so I'll hit one of those days too. For some reason I still like to challenge myself.

Someday it will probably bite me, but wtf! Life's short.
As the saying goes "better to wear out than to rust out". lol

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7/17/2019 5:18 PM

Indy mxer wrote:

I know what you mean. But that's pretty stout on your part riding in those conditions.
It's 92 degrees and 59% humidity here. Heat index 100. I'm heading out for a 4 mile run knowing it will be a bitch.

I always try to run on the hottest day of the year just to show myself I can still do it. I know, not real smart.
The next few days it's going to get to mid 90's here so I'll hit one of those days too. For some reason I still like to challenge myself.

Someday it will probably bite me, but wtf! Life's short.
As the saying goes "better to wear out than to rust out". lol

I know what you mean. Challenges are good. Plus, it’s only going to get hotter, so might as well try to get used to it.

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7/17/2019 6:03 PM

Indy mxer wrote:

We don't need to "go" to a spin class, that's the cool part. It comes to us. Obviously you didn't read my post. I simply said the Peloton bike that you see on tv is a hell of a cardio workout and uses the same muscles as cycling. Plus it's a better cardio workout if you push yourself.

And that I see why the pros use cycling in their training programs. Cycling definitely uses more muscles than running.
Btw, I wasn't comparing my workouts to what the pro's do.


I'm not knocking you, I have a Lemond Spin bike in my garage that I love. I don't recall if it was you but someone mentioned being an avid runner but spin class kicked their butt. Spin class is super intense, especially for someone who has spent so much time running. I had a girlfriend in college who could spin easily but would have to quit rowing because her arms would pump up.

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7/17/2019 6:49 PM

TJMX947 wrote:

I 1000% agree. Someone above mentioned they were an avid runner but went to a spin class and it kicked their butt. There is a huge difference between a spin class and the program the top guys use to build and maintain their fitness. I see the road bike being useful in the off season for base building purposes and for in season recovery. Right now these guys are just trying to maintain and survive these last few nationals.

Indy mxer wrote:

We don't need to "go" to a spin class, that's the cool part. It comes to us. Obviously you didn't read my post. I simply said the Peloton bike that you see on tv is a hell of a cardio workout and uses the same muscles as cycling. Plus it's a better cardio workout if you push yourself.

And that I see why the pros use cycling in their training programs. Cycling definitely uses more muscles than running.
Btw, I wasn't comparing my workouts to what the pro's do.


TJMX947 wrote:

I'm not knocking you, I have a Lemond Spin bike in my garage that I love. I don't recall if it was you but someone mentioned being an avid runner but spin class kicked their butt. Spin class is super intense, especially for someone who has spent so much time running. I had a girlfriend in college who could spin easily but would have to quit rowing because her arms would pump up.

Yes that was me that said that and I'm still an avid runner. But I do admit the Peloton doesn't really help with upper body.
They do some arm stuff with 3 lb weights but it's just for a little toning.
I wouldn't do well on a rower either. lol

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