This is why I shop online...

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2/18/2020 7:40 PM

Down in Florida for a moto vacation and I break a clutch cable. Yes I should’ve brought my Extra clutch cable with me but it didn’t cross my mind since I’ve never snapped one. Anyways long story short I called over 10 dealers and not one of them carried a clutch cable for a 2019 CRF450r....yet they complain we need to support our local dealers. Luckily I’m borrowing a buddies bike so my trip is saved but come on dealers...

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2/18/2020 7:41 PM

Goes hand in hand, no point stocking parts when they don't sell because everybody buys online.

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2/18/2020 8:05 PM

fanger wrote:

Goes hand in hand, no point stocking parts when they don't sell because everybody buys online.

Honestly, they haven't carried parts in stock since before the internet onslaught.

Normally l'd cheer a fuck internet purchases post but in this case they are the cause.

Not to mention they should go the other way now. If riders knew a shop actually carried some parts there'd be a line around the block.

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2/18/2020 8:14 PM

My local Honda dealer didn’t stock brake pads or levers. Brake pads were the same for like ten years at that point. Made me scratch me head more than once.

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2/18/2020 9:00 PM

I am the Parts Manager at a Ford/Lincoln dealer, that sells over $14,000,000.00 per year in parts. Here is the truth about parts and parts sales.

Number 1, you have to have sales history to be able to stock the correct inventory. If nobody is buying it you shouldn’t be stocking it. that being said you must log any lost sales to build adequate history. If someone asks for a part and you don’t stock it, you log a lost sale. That starts the process. You get enough hits, the part gets stocked.

2. Holding inventory is very expensive, we keep nothing longer than 12 months without a sale. We aren’t running a museum, we have to make a profit.

3. If you never come in to buy anything, we won’t stock anything other than what the service department needs. It can always be ordered, but you may not like the time frame to get it. Lots of stuff now is next day or two days so that is less of a issue.

4. If your not supporting your local parts department buy purchasing parts from them, it is no surprise they don’t stock what you may need. It is a demand driven business. There is no crystal ball to figure out what the demand for a part will be.

The parts business is all about turning products on the shelf, and taking care of your customers. It’s a very fine line between too much and not enough. Some dealers are really good at it and some just aren’t. If you find a good one use them, so they can afford to stock the stuff you need.

Sometimes it’s the whole chicken and the egg argument. Did you not sell it because you didn’t stock it or did you stock it but never sold any so you sent them back. It’s a tough business to get right and make money doing it.

The big online retailers have the advantage of lots of sales data that the little guys don’t have. They know how many bikes are out there, what the top selling part numbers are and a nation wide customer base, as opposed to a city/county wide customer base. They play on a significantly larger scale than the average local dealer. More sales history more inventory.

Accessories and clothing is a whole other issue that I know nothing about. Getting the right mix of that is a black art that I don’t fully understand, nor want to. I”ll stick to selling car parts.

Support the good guys, they need you and you need them.

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2/18/2020 11:08 PM

I avoid Stealers at all costs (cars/trucks and bikes)... been burned way too many times by their thievery on parts and service.

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Support those who protect us....our military, law enforcement and 1st responders.



2/19/2020 12:23 AM

I understand if the dealer doesn’t have a piston for my bike but common wear items? Brake Pads, spark plug, levers. We are talking less than a grand in parts to stock for “common Honda big bikes” Honda clutch cable has been the same for at least four years 2017-2020.

I once needed a seat bolt for my 2014 crf250r the morning of a race weekend. Ended up ordering the bolt from my dealer, putting a $50 hold on a 2017crf250r and stealing the bolt from new bike. Bolt came in and they put it on the new bike, gave me my $50 back and gained a customer for life. Some dealers are a cut above the rest, some are not.

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2/19/2020 3:33 AM

nascarnate326 wrote:

I understand if the dealer doesn’t have a piston for my bike but common wear items? Brake Pads, spark plug, levers. We are talking less than a grand in parts to stock for “common Honda big bikes” Honda clutch cable has been the same for at least four years 2017-2020.

I once needed a seat bolt for my 2014 crf250r the morning of a race weekend. Ended up ordering the bolt from my dealer, putting a $50 hold on a 2017crf250r and stealing the bolt from new bike. Bolt came in and they put it on the new bike, gave me my $50 back and gained a customer for life. Some dealers are a cut above the rest, some are not.

I get what you are saying. So take every model of bike, quad, side by side, boat motor, snowmobile and lawn equipment that they sell for 5-6 model years, and multiply that by $1000.00 for “wear items”. In a Honda Yamaha store thats a lot of inventory to gamble on that somebody is going to need this part someday. Again if it isn’t selling at a reasonable quantity, our criteria is 3 sales in 9 months, on most items, some are 2 sales in 6 months, you cannot afford to keep it and watch it collect dust,

We have to pay for our inventory weekly, we order parts and they take the money. It’s not like a new bike that you can floor plan and pay interest only to have it set on the showroom floor. Parts inventory is a huge investment that has to pay for itself and make a profit. Most dealers just don’t/can’t have that much money tied up in dead/slow moving stock.

Again if you and your riding buddies are not buying it it makes 0 sense to keep it around just in case you need it someday, maybe. If your local grocery store never sells dragonfriuit they won’t stock it, because it is a waste of money. It’s no different with parts. No sales No stock.

Now there are dealers that value and promote parts sales and service and some that don’t. If you value that, you may have to choose a different color bike next time and support the dealer that takes care of you after the sale.

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2/19/2020 3:39 AM

nascarnate326 wrote:

I understand if the dealer doesn’t have a piston for my bike but common wear items? Brake Pads, spark plug, levers. We are talking less than a grand in parts to stock for “common Honda big bikes” Honda clutch cable has been the same for at least four years 2017-2020.

I once needed a seat bolt for my 2014 crf250r the morning of a race weekend. Ended up ordering the bolt from my dealer, putting a $50 hold on a 2017crf250r and stealing the bolt from new bike. Bolt came in and they put it on the new bike, gave me my $50 back and gained a customer for life. Some dealers are a cut above the rest, some are not.

deluxeman wrote:

I get what you are saying. So take every model of bike, quad, side by side, boat motor, snowmobile and lawn equipment that they sell for 5-6 model years, and multiply that by $1000.00 for “wear items”. In a Honda Yamaha store thats a lot of inventory to gamble on that somebody is going to need this part someday. Again if it isn’t selling at a reasonable quantity, our criteria is 3 sales in 9 months, on most items, some are 2 sales in 6 months, you cannot afford to keep it and watch it collect dust,

We have to pay for our inventory weekly, we order parts and they take the money. It’s not like a new bike that you can floor plan and pay interest only to have it set on the showroom floor. Parts inventory is a huge investment that has to pay for itself and make a profit. Most dealers just don’t/can’t have that much money tied up in dead/slow moving stock.

Again if you and your riding buddies are not buying it it makes 0 sense to keep it around just in case you need it someday, maybe. If your local grocery store never sells dragonfriuit they won’t stock it, because it is a waste of money. It’s no different with parts. No sales No stock.

Now there are dealers that value and promote parts sales and service and some that don’t. If you value that, you may have to choose a different color bike next time and support the dealer that takes care of you after the sale.

I wasn’t thinking about large stores. My local store sells dirt bikes and motorcycles only. Pretty sure they keep in business thanks to Goldwing sales.

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2/19/2020 4:02 AM

I shop online because my nearest KTM dealer is 60mi away. It’s a half day ordeal to get there and find out they don’t have the part. I can order online as late as Thursday, choose FeEx delivery and still receive parts on Saturday. The Big Four dealers near me stock very few parts, aren’t knowledgeable about their products and don’t act friendly towards customers.

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2/19/2020 4:14 AM

deluxeman wrote:

I am the Parts Manager at a Ford/Lincoln dealer, that sells over $14,000,000.00 per year in parts. Here is the truth about parts and parts sales.

Number 1, you have to have sales history to be able to stock the correct inventory. If nobody is buying it you shouldn’t be stocking it. that being said you must log any lost sales to build adequate history. If someone asks for a part and you don’t stock it, you log a lost sale. That starts the process. You get enough hits, the part gets stocked.

2. Holding inventory is very expensive, we keep nothing longer than 12 months without a sale. We aren’t running a museum, we have to make a profit.

3. If you never come in to buy anything, we won’t stock anything other than what the service department needs. It can always be ordered, but you may not like the time frame to get it. Lots of stuff now is next day or two days so that is less of a issue.

4. If your not supporting your local parts department buy purchasing parts from them, it is no surprise they don’t stock what you may need. It is a demand driven business. There is no crystal ball to figure out what the demand for a part will be.

The parts business is all about turning products on the shelf, and taking care of your customers. It’s a very fine line between too much and not enough. Some dealers are really good at it and some just aren’t. If you find a good one use them, so they can afford to stock the stuff you need.

Sometimes it’s the whole chicken and the egg argument. Did you not sell it because you didn’t stock it or did you stock it but never sold any so you sent them back. It’s a tough business to get right and make money doing it.

The big online retailers have the advantage of lots of sales data that the little guys don’t have. They know how many bikes are out there, what the top selling part numbers are and a nation wide customer base, as opposed to a city/county wide customer base. They play on a significantly larger scale than the average local dealer. More sales history more inventory.

Accessories and clothing is a whole other issue that I know nothing about. Getting the right mix of that is a black art that I don’t fully understand, nor want to. I”ll stick to selling car parts.

Support the good guys, they need you and you need them.

Only 14 Million in Ford parts sales at one location, figured it would be double that.

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2/19/2020 4:17 AM

Shopping is moving towards a fully online market. Just the way it is. The majority of people do not care about brick and mortar shops. One day we will be buying motorcycles online and having them shipped to our doors and dealerships will be a mechanic shop only.

Maybe we need an “autozone” for motorcycles that will have stuff in stock.

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2/19/2020 4:25 AM

deluxeman wrote:

I am the Parts Manager at a Ford/Lincoln dealer, that sells over $14,000,000.00 per year in parts. Here is the truth about parts and parts sales.

Number 1, you have to have sales history to be able to stock the correct inventory. If nobody is buying it you shouldn’t be stocking it. that being said you must log any lost sales to build adequate history. If someone asks for a part and you don’t stock it, you log a lost sale. That starts the process. You get enough hits, the part gets stocked.

2. Holding inventory is very expensive, we keep nothing longer than 12 months without a sale. We aren’t running a museum, we have to make a profit.

3. If you never come in to buy anything, we won’t stock anything other than what the service department needs. It can always be ordered, but you may not like the time frame to get it. Lots of stuff now is next day or two days so that is less of a issue.

4. If your not supporting your local parts department buy purchasing parts from them, it is no surprise they don’t stock what you may need. It is a demand driven business. There is no crystal ball to figure out what the demand for a part will be.

The parts business is all about turning products on the shelf, and taking care of your customers. It’s a very fine line between too much and not enough. Some dealers are really good at it and some just aren’t. If you find a good one use them, so they can afford to stock the stuff you need.

Sometimes it’s the whole chicken and the egg argument. Did you not sell it because you didn’t stock it or did you stock it but never sold any so you sent them back. It’s a tough business to get right and make money doing it.

The big online retailers have the advantage of lots of sales data that the little guys don’t have. They know how many bikes are out there, what the top selling part numbers are and a nation wide customer base, as opposed to a city/county wide customer base. They play on a significantly larger scale than the average local dealer. More sales history more inventory.

Accessories and clothing is a whole other issue that I know nothing about. Getting the right mix of that is a black art that I don’t fully understand, nor want to. I”ll stick to selling car parts.

Support the good guys, they need you and you need them.

I try and support them when I’m back home but it seems they never carry anything. Like said above his dealer didn’t even have brake pads or a lever. Stuff so simple that people will buy

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2/19/2020 4:26 AM

nascarnate326 wrote:

I understand if the dealer doesn’t have a piston for my bike but common wear items? Brake Pads, spark plug, levers. We are talking less than a grand in parts to stock for “common Honda big bikes” Honda clutch cable has been the same for at least four years 2017-2020.

I once needed a seat bolt for my 2014 crf250r the morning of a race weekend. Ended up ordering the bolt from my dealer, putting a $50 hold on a 2017crf250r and stealing the bolt from new bike. Bolt came in and they put it on the new bike, gave me my $50 back and gained a customer for life. Some dealers are a cut above the rest, some are not.

Yup it blew my mind that no one had that in stock....a $18 part and they can’t carry at least 1 cable.

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2/19/2020 5:09 AM

Seems like they should carry wear parts like that for the bikes they sell? I don’t run a shop though. I can order from my local dealer before 4pm and have it next day

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2/19/2020 5:17 AM

In your position right now, if you ordered online, when exactly do you get your hands on the item? Tomorrow?

Cant the dealer provide that service for you also?

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2/19/2020 5:18 AM

reded wrote:

I shop online because my nearest KTM dealer is 60mi away. It’s a half day ordeal to get there and find out they don’t have the part. I can order online as late as Thursday, choose FeEx delivery and still receive parts on Saturday. The Big Four dealers near me stock very few parts, aren’t knowledgeable about their products and don’t act friendly towards customers.

You wanna get yourself a phone! Then you'll be able to call your dealer to see if they have it before you go drive all that way.

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2/19/2020 6:29 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/19/2020 6:31 AM

deluxeman wrote:

I am the Parts Manager at a Ford/Lincoln dealer, that sells over $14,000,000.00 per year in parts. Here is the truth about parts and parts sales.

Number 1, you have to have sales history to be able to stock the correct inventory. If nobody is buying it you shouldn’t be stocking it. that being said you must log any lost sales to build adequate history. If someone asks for a part and you don’t stock it, you log a lost sale. That starts the process. You get enough hits, the part gets stocked.

2. Holding inventory is very expensive, we keep nothing longer than 12 months without a sale. We aren’t running a museum, we have to make a profit.

3. If you never come in to buy anything, we won’t stock anything other than what the service department needs. It can always be ordered, but you may not like the time frame to get it. Lots of stuff now is next day or two days so that is less of a issue.

4. If your not supporting your local parts department buy purchasing parts from them, it is no surprise they don’t stock what you may need. It is a demand driven business. There is no crystal ball to figure out what the demand for a part will be.

The parts business is all about turning products on the shelf, and taking care of your customers. It’s a very fine line between too much and not enough. Some dealers are really good at it and some just aren’t. If you find a good one use them, so they can afford to stock the stuff you need.

Sometimes it’s the whole chicken and the egg argument. Did you not sell it because you didn’t stock it or did you stock it but never sold any so you sent them back. It’s a tough business to get right and make money doing it.

The big online retailers have the advantage of lots of sales data that the little guys don’t have. They know how many bikes are out there, what the top selling part numbers are and a nation wide customer base, as opposed to a city/county wide customer base. They play on a significantly larger scale than the average local dealer. More sales history more inventory.

Accessories and clothing is a whole other issue that I know nothing about. Getting the right mix of that is a black art that I don’t fully understand, nor want to. I”ll stick to selling car parts.

Support the good guys, they need you and you need them.

Great story...but a friggin clutch cable? Come on. Maybe stock ...ONE?? I've seen most places stock 10 types of grips, 200 stickers, 5 sets of AM bars, a couple types of clutch levers and brake levers, 40 sets of goggles, Oakley glasses, 5 kinds of oil...but no clutch cable that is a NORMAL wear part and costs what $15 for an MX bike that is 100% current in the lineup and makes the bike useless without it? That's funny right there.

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2/19/2020 6:34 AM

deluxeman wrote:

I am the Parts Manager at a Ford/Lincoln dealer, that sells over $14,000,000.00 per year in parts. Here is the truth about parts and parts sales.

Number 1, you have to have sales history to be able to stock the correct inventory. If nobody is buying it you shouldn’t be stocking it. that being said you must log any lost sales to build adequate history. If someone asks for a part and you don’t stock it, you log a lost sale. That starts the process. You get enough hits, the part gets stocked.

2. Holding inventory is very expensive, we keep nothing longer than 12 months without a sale. We aren’t running a museum, we have to make a profit.

3. If you never come in to buy anything, we won’t stock anything other than what the service department needs. It can always be ordered, but you may not like the time frame to get it. Lots of stuff now is next day or two days so that is less of a issue.

4. If your not supporting your local parts department buy purchasing parts from them, it is no surprise they don’t stock what you may need. It is a demand driven business. There is no crystal ball to figure out what the demand for a part will be.

The parts business is all about turning products on the shelf, and taking care of your customers. It’s a very fine line between too much and not enough. Some dealers are really good at it and some just aren’t. If you find a good one use them, so they can afford to stock the stuff you need.

Sometimes it’s the whole chicken and the egg argument. Did you not sell it because you didn’t stock it or did you stock it but never sold any so you sent them back. It’s a tough business to get right and make money doing it.

The big online retailers have the advantage of lots of sales data that the little guys don’t have. They know how many bikes are out there, what the top selling part numbers are and a nation wide customer base, as opposed to a city/county wide customer base. They play on a significantly larger scale than the average local dealer. More sales history more inventory.

Accessories and clothing is a whole other issue that I know nothing about. Getting the right mix of that is a black art that I don’t fully understand, nor want to. I”ll stick to selling car parts.

Support the good guys, they need you and you need them.

MOTO1313 wrote:

Great story...but a friggin clutch cable? Come on. Maybe stock ...ONE?? I've seen most places stock 10 types of grips, 200 stickers, 5 sets of AM bars, a couple types of clutch levers and brake levers, 40 sets of goggles, Oakley glasses, 5 kinds of oil...but no clutch cable that is a NORMAL wear part and costs what $15 for an MX bike that is 100% current in the lineup and makes the bike useless without it? That's funny right there.

My thoughts exactly. No ones going to a dealer and buying all that BS stuff. Dealerships are supposed to be a convenience thing. Stop by grab the parts and riding the same day.

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2/19/2020 6:40 AM

I shop on-line because my local shops refuses to stock anything, even everyday stuff like grips, handlebars, etc.... and they do not stock ANY high-end gear at all......

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www.bettercallsaul.com
Die Antwoord

2/19/2020 7:04 AM

I'm lucky enough to have a local dealer that usually stocks a fair amount of parts/accessories. 80% of the time i can get them to match or beat online prices. I would much rather support my local dealer than any online retailer. There are also times where the dealer can't come close to online prices or they would be taking a loss. For the hell of it, i showed one of my buddies that works at said dealer what i pay for oil online (12$ a gallon less than their best in store price) and it's below their cost... I see the dealers frustration with competing against online sales when you can get most anything within a day or two for less money.
I always give them a shot at matching or beating so i can continue to support them.

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2/19/2020 7:19 AM


I really try to support my local brick and mortar shop. Been shopping their since '87. The issue I find is that they don't pay well and whenever they get a good guy on the parts counter who knows his stuff about moto, they lose him to another shop. Recently they hired a guy who knows nothing about moto, and when I went to order some shrouds, he calls them "side fairings"...a week later I call to order a TM Designs chain guide and slider kit and he tells me he's unable to order it. Knowing he was just being lazy and thumbing through the Tucker Rocky catalog, I called TM Designs and they confirmed that my shop has an account with them. I called my shop back, got him to put it on order but there was some attitude from him, which I didn't appreciate. Meanwhile, I can send an email to BTO, if they have the parts on hand, I see them the very next day on my door step. Anyhow, I've stopped dealing that parts guy and have moved down the counter to another parts guy who knows moto fairly well and is happy to go the extra mile for a sale.
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Do It In The Dirt!

2/19/2020 7:21 AM

Thisusernameisavailable wrote:

In your position right now, if you ordered online, when exactly do you get your hands on the item? Tomorrow?

Cant the dealer provide that service for you also?

I'm all for shopping at your local store and supporting them. I wear their gear brands they stock to move inventory even if I like a different brand (only for non safety items). I'm even willing to pay more for the convenience of walking in, touching it, chatting with them, and walking out the door with product. However, If it's something that has to be ordered and I have to make another trip back AND pay more then I'm more likely to shop online. If they price match or come close to internet pricing I will make the 2nd trip.

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2/19/2020 7:25 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/19/2020 7:25 AM

deluxeman wrote:

I am the Parts Manager at a Ford/Lincoln dealer, that sells over $14,000,000.00 per year in parts. Here is the truth about parts and parts sales.

Number 1, you have to have sales history to be able to stock the correct inventory. If nobody is buying it you shouldn’t be stocking it. that being said you must log any lost sales to build adequate history. If someone asks for a part and you don’t stock it, you log a lost sale. That starts the process. You get enough hits, the part gets stocked.

2. Holding inventory is very expensive, we keep nothing longer than 12 months without a sale. We aren’t running a museum, we have to make a profit.

3. If you never come in to buy anything, we won’t stock anything other than what the service department needs. It can always be ordered, but you may not like the time frame to get it. Lots of stuff now is next day or two days so that is less of a issue.

4. If your not supporting your local parts department buy purchasing parts from them, it is no surprise they don’t stock what you may need. It is a demand driven business. There is no crystal ball to figure out what the demand for a part will be.

The parts business is all about turning products on the shelf, and taking care of your customers. It’s a very fine line between too much and not enough. Some dealers are really good at it and some just aren’t. If you find a good one use them, so they can afford to stock the stuff you need.

Sometimes it’s the whole chicken and the egg argument. Did you not sell it because you didn’t stock it or did you stock it but never sold any so you sent them back. It’s a tough business to get right and make money doing it.

The big online retailers have the advantage of lots of sales data that the little guys don’t have. They know how many bikes are out there, what the top selling part numbers are and a nation wide customer base, as opposed to a city/county wide customer base. They play on a significantly larger scale than the average local dealer. More sales history more inventory.

Accessories and clothing is a whole other issue that I know nothing about. Getting the right mix of that is a black art that I don’t fully understand, nor want to. I”ll stick to selling car parts.

Support the good guys, they need you and you need them.

Markee wrote:

Only 14 Million in Ford parts sales at one location, figured it would be double that.

That’s a large scale parts department. . I work as a Service Advisor for Ford and we are one of the largest in the nation. Our parts department is half of that.

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2/19/2020 7:36 AM

MotoMan12345 wrote:

Down in Florida for a moto vacation and I break a clutch cable. Yes I should’ve brought my Extra clutch cable with me but it didn’t cross my mind since I’ve never snapped one. Anyways long story short I called over 10 dealers and not one of them carried a clutch cable for a 2019 CRF450r....yet they complain we need to support our local dealers. Luckily I’m borrowing a buddies bike so my trip is saved but come on dealers...

Your online store does not have OEM parts in stock they often get it drop shipped from OEM manufactures. I work at a Honda Dealer in the parts department and have seen this... we try to keep stuff in stock to keep you going Spark plugs, oil filters, air filters, chems, and some levers we can't stock everything. Most of the money made at dealerships is made in the service department. If you stop supporting local dealer you STOP SUPPORTING YOUR SPORT!!

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2/19/2020 7:45 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/19/2020 7:46 AM

BRAPPWHIP86 wrote:

Your online store does not have OEM parts in stock they often get it drop shipped from OEM manufactures. I work at a Honda Dealer in the parts department and have seen this... we try to keep stuff in stock to keep you going Spark plugs, oil filters, air filters, chems, and some levers we can't stock everything. Most of the money made at dealerships is made in the service department. If you stop supporting local dealer you STOP SUPPORTING YOUR SPORT!!

Hahaha you're clueless. Oems do not drop ship, especially Honda.

"If you stop supporting local dealer you STOP SUPPORTING YOUR SPORT!!"

I'm pretty sure BTO,RMATV and Motosport would argue your comment. In the last 10 years all 3 of those companies have done way more for MX than any local dealer ever has..

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2/19/2020 7:48 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/19/2020 7:50 AM

I can remember when four stroke mx bikes were carbed. Every bike used the same fcr keihins. Called local dealers asking for a pilot jet. Nobody had one.

So you can defend dealers all you want making up how expensive stocking parts is. They cant even stock jets that cost them maybe $2 and 1 square inch of storage space. And the part could be used on kawi, Suzuki, honda, yamaha, ktm, and even husky at the time. That really got me.

"We can order it"

Yeah no shit, so can I, cheaper, faster and without having to explain to you what it is.

They flat out lie constantly to get sales also. They won't stock high end gear and wil tell you the lower end from the same brand fits the same as the high end. As if a tech 3 boot fits exactly like a tech 10. Or a v1 helmet fits the exact as a v4. Etc.
.thats bs and not true.

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2/19/2020 8:03 AM

I was a KTM rep back in the mid 2000's, this was my number one complaint to dealers. Stock the basic shit that everyone goes through. If you have it, word gets around fast, people will buy it! I to this day will go into a dealer if he can put in my hand today..crap, i will even pay more! The dealers that lived by that motto are still around today, i can think of alot of them that are not.

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Did i do that?

2/19/2020 8:09 AM

We must be spoiled in Dallas. I went to Dallas Honda to buy six levers for the kids' 110s (constantly crashing) and they sold me six levers. Same with KTM/Husky stuff at Adventure Moto. I don't think they have ever had to order a part for us, always had it in stock. Plus any brand of gear, boots and helmets. There must just be more people that ride off-road around here so the dealers turn their inventory more often.

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2/19/2020 8:20 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/19/2020 8:23 AM

Here’s my 2 cents. I was a parts manager for a few different dealers in Ohio over a 15 year period and I am currently an inside sales/parts manager at a distributor. We deal with dealers, so I see both sides of not stocking stuff. We do about $25 million in parts and another $40 million in equipment. We have a 97%-98% fill rate on parts for most major lines and low 90’s on minor lines.
On our side of things small to mid-size dealers do not like to stock parts because of our level of service. Most of our territory if orders are in by 4:30pm they will have it next day.

Dealers need to remember:
• It’s hard to get a sales history if you don’t stock stuff
• Every manufacture produces a suggested fast mover list for dealers to stock
• All oems do an annual or quarterly return so you can circulate fresh inventory. Most do not charge a restock if
you’re in good standings.

My son wrecked on his PW and broke a brake lever, so I swung by Iron Pony(mega dealer) on the way home. I asked for a rear brake lever for his PW and the guy argues that motorcycles don’t have rear brake levers. After a few minutes of this dumbass looking for a foot brake pedal I looked up the part number on my phone and gave it to him. Of course they didn’t have it. There’s no way they don’t have enough sales history not to justify stocking a part that has been unchanged for 30+ years.

This just happened Saturday. I never ever buy tires local but I decided I would over pay for a set at a local dealer. I called to confirm they had a front and rear 10” tires , guy on the phone said yes. I drove down there and lo and behold they only had the front. So I wasted 2hrs of my Saturday for something I was willing to over pay $25 for.

I’ve kind of gave up on buying local other than bikes. Dealers don’t stock anything and very rarely employee knowledgeable people.

Stock the basic shit and people will order the odd ball shit.

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