Suspension? What's more important?

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11/1/2018 7:55 PM

So it's getting that time of year that riding is slowing down and I'm looking to freshen up things for next season. I have a 2018 yz450f and I want to see the suspension up properly. I've rebuilt my own suspension for a while now but obviously never messed with the valving. So my question is which is more important: the correct spring rate or revalve? Race tech suggests a .48 fork and .57 shock spring and my bike has a .51 and .57 stock. So I was thinking get the correct spring rate first and freshen up the seals and oil then revalve later but curious what others thought. What would you do?

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11/1/2018 7:57 PM

Spring rare first then revalve but I always had both done at the same time before we reassembled the bikes out of the.crate

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11/1/2018 8:25 PM

better off getting them done at the same time.
end up being cheaper then doing separate and makes a whole lot of difference..

its not worth doing one and not the other. same as your rear shock

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11/1/2018 8:28 PM

If I do the springs I'll do them myself so it'll just be the cost of parts. The revalve I will have to send the suspension off.

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11/1/2018 8:33 PM

Racer142 wrote:

If I do the springs I'll do them myself so it'll just be the cost of parts. The revalve I will have to send the suspension off.

they have to pull it apart for the revalve any way.
so if you choose to replace the spring as well,you only get charged for the spring, no added labour to fit the spring.

fluids get changed as well depending on your weight and ridding ability too.



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11/1/2018 8:35 PM

Springs and valving should be done at the same time. Incorrect springs with correct valving , is no different then having the correct springs , and your valving set up wrong. They both compliment each other in ways that make both of them work properly.

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And there goes Jeffro. One of God's own prototypes. A super high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.

Pimpin' Ho's , Rollin' fatty's......drinkin' beers , beers , beers!! ~ Ja

11/1/2018 9:01 PM

Springs first, then valving. After exhausting clickers and oil levels, take a crack at
re-valving yourself. Immensely satisfying.

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11/1/2018 11:40 PM

It really depends on your budget.

In my opinion, there is nothing better than a well setup set of suspension; however, the best you've ridden is the best you know and until you've had it you don't know what you are or aren't missing out on.

Spring rates first for sure, especially when the stock setting isn't terrible and you aren't making a massive jump. You'll notice a good difference in the balance of the bike getting proper rate springs and fresh fluids. If you can do those yourself, it may not be a bad idea to drop in a set of springs with your rebuild along with GOOD QUALITY FLUIDS!!!

Then, later down the road, look at the revalve. You at least don't have to buy the springs twice and you'll get everything fresh at the same time.

If you have the budget, I'd love for you to experience the full setup, but you aren't doing anything bad going with spring rates first.

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11/2/2018 12:14 AM

That's what I was thinking but cool to hear it from racetech since I was using your spring rate calculator and going to buy your springs. It's kyb aoss suspension and everybody raves about the stock valving so I figured springs now and a revalve at the next service. All at once would be awesome but likely out of my budget. Might give yall a call tomorrow.

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11/2/2018 12:48 AM

Race Tech spring rates are used for Race Tech valving. Every suspension tunner has their own philosophy on tunning. Spring rates, oil heights, shim stacks, etc. Always use static sag on the front and rear to determine if you are too stiff or to soft for the OEM set up.

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11/2/2018 12:53 AM

I'm pretty sure other suspension companies use Race Tech spring rates, and I know at least one spring vendor/maker that does too.

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11/2/2018 4:47 AM

Spring rate is most important. YZ forks are pretty spectacular in stock form. Since you have the know how, you ought to try the correct spring rate first. With the correct spring rate, you might find that the stock valving works great, and you’ll have a ton of money left in your wallet.

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11/2/2018 4:59 AM

quadzrulebro wrote:

Spring rate is most important. YZ forks are pretty spectacular in stock form. Since you have the know how, you ought to try the correct spring rate first. With the correct spring rate, you might find that the stock valving works great, and you’ll have a ton of money left in your wallet.

This. I have a 2018 yz450f too and l find that the front end is not too soft, rather requires quite a tight/slow compression and rebound setting; especially compared to previous versions of that fork.

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11/2/2018 5:31 AM

why not do it all up front if youre going to do it anyways? Kindof ass backwards thinking

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11/2/2018 5:43 AM

FWYT wrote:

Springs first, then valving. After exhausting clickers and oil levels, take a crack at
re-valving yourself. Immensely satisfying.

This.

Get your spring rate right and see how you like it. Play with clickers, sag, and fork height and get it as good as you can.

If you're still unhappy, send it out for revalve and work with your suspension tuner on dialing it in.

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11/2/2018 6:14 AM

Racer142 wrote:

If I do the springs I'll do them myself so it'll just be the cost of parts. The revalve I will have to send the suspension off.

deanwhite51 wrote:

they have to pull it apart for the revalve any way.
so if you choose to replace the spring as well,you only get charged for the spring, no added labour to fit the spring.

fluids get changed as well depending on your weight and ridding ability too.



He does the springs himself, so just springs and oil.

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Take it to the limit, one more time!

11/2/2018 6:18 AM

IMO I don't think its going to be night and day better for you. Being able to properly set the sag gets you 98% of where you need to be. Since you already have the rear shock spring rate that RT suggests I feel like you're there.

I'm not one of the guys on here who will say you're wasting your money though, so do the revalve and springs at the same time and enjoy it. I'm way heavier than the target weight for MX bikes and I will wholeheartedly tell you that getting the suspension to perform properly lives and dies with your ability to get the sag set and have forks that balance the front end with the rear end.

If memory serves me correctly it always seems like Yamaha does different things with spring rates to supplement the geometry of the frame. That might be why you're target for the RT shock set up but you need softer springs for the forks. Go for it though and let us know how it goes.

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11/2/2018 7:01 AM

kb228 wrote:

why not do it all up front if youre going to do it anyways? Kindof ass backwards thinking

Because I'm not pro and this isn't going to make me any faster just hopefully more comfortable /safer. I ride almost every weekend and like spending money on riding so if I can buy springs for $130 plus oil and seals and it make a noticeable difference versus $800 plus for springs and a revalve at the same time why not? I was curious what others thought and when race tech themselves chimed in to say it's a good idea I tend to believe them.

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11/2/2018 7:26 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/2/2018 7:27 AM

Springs fisrt and go from there. Springs support weight, valving controls the dampening etc. You very well could piss away money if you can nail it with springs as you're not too far off and if you're no pro, I'd bet you'll can.

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It's better to die on your feet, than to live on your knees.

11/2/2018 7:34 AM

Change ONE variable at a time. As already mentioned, change spring rate first for the load. Make sure oil and pressures are standard. Adjust clickers to suit you. If you can't find a suitable setting with clickers, then start messing with oil level and valving. Again one change at a time.

Have fun. At the end of the day, it's all riding a dirt bike for fun.

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11/2/2018 8:09 AM

kb228 wrote:

why not do it all up front if youre going to do it anyways? Kindof ass backwards thinking

Racer142 wrote:

Because I'm not pro and this isn't going to make me any faster just hopefully more comfortable /safer. I ride almost every weekend and like spending money on riding so if I can buy springs for $130 plus oil and seals and it make a noticeable difference versus $800 plus for springs and a revalve at the same time why not? I was curious what others thought and when race tech themselves chimed in to say it's a good idea I tend to believe them.

If you have the patience you’ll get it damn close with the correct spring rates, oil, (amount and weight), and clickers.
Keys: know what weight oil is stock and go up or down from there (good quality oil)
Oil height/amount prevents bottoming. Very little bit makes a big difference
Clicker adjustment the front affects the back and visa versa (balance wise) two clicks at a time is rule of thumb.

Good luck and again be patient

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11/2/2018 9:59 AM

Spring it right first.
Then correct valving.
Doing both at same time? Priceless....

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11/2/2018 10:38 AM

Just go for it and get it all done.

You'll be very happy.

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I ripped a start from Egypt and I was happy about that.

11/2/2018 11:54 AM

How could you possibly know that you need a revalve if the bike isn't sprung properly?

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11/2/2018 12:03 PM

Looking at the Race Tech website for pricing on 19 KX450. If you need springs and want to do the full boat gold valve package with seals, bushings, bladder cap, rings, etc it prices out to over $1,300. Called to order box to ship and that is another $65 shipped to me before I pay shipping costs back and forth. Figure $75 insured each way so $1,515. Seems pricey to me but maybe I'm just old. Is this stuff really that good?

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11/2/2018 12:21 PM

If the bike is new, there should be no reason to replace bushings and certain other parts.

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2017 RMZ450
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1998 YZ250
2005 KX250F

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11/2/2018 1:11 PM

Not worried about that $80 of it plus the bike is used.

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11/2/2018 1:45 PM

Suspension shops are making money and staying busy selling revalves to lots of guys who really don't need it. It seems there is this culture of accepting that your new bike needs to be sent off to have the suspension "done" when so many guy's don't even set their sag or figure out how the clickers work and relate to what they feel on the track.

Sure there are instances to definitely revalve. But I believe there are lots of models coming with really really good setting from the factory and are hard to improve on unless you fall into a very specific category of being incredibly fast, incredibly slow, or way out their on weight.

It's amazing how adjustable modern suspension is. The last few bikes I've had have only needed different valving on one end....and it was very minor shim changes or removals that achieved what I needed.

Lots of guys just want the revalve stickers!

I shake my head at the amount of money some guys on vital spend on their suspension and then still complain that their bike doesn't work

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11/2/2018 1:55 PM

Stock bikes can't be adjusted to accommodate a 6'1 265lb rider.

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11/2/2018 1:57 PM

wpark89 wrote:

Suspension shops are making money and staying busy selling revalves to lots of guys who really don't need it. It seems there is this culture of accepting that your new bike needs to be sent off to have the suspension "done" when so many guy's don't even set their sag or figure out how the clickers work and relate to what they feel on the track.

Sure there are instances to definitely revalve. But I believe there are lots of models coming with really really good setting from the factory and are hard to improve on unless you fall into a very specific category of being incredibly fast, incredibly slow, or way out their on weight.

It's amazing how adjustable modern suspension is. The last few bikes I've had have only needed different valving on one end....and it was very minor shim changes or removals that achieved what I needed.

Lots of guys just want the revalve stickers!

I shake my head at the amount of money some guys on vital spend on their suspension and then still complain that their bike doesn't work

Well , for me , I can adjust my suspension pretty well at the track's and get it setup correctly for each ride. But I don't trust myself enough to tear into it and make the correct valving changes ( among other things ) without screwing it up , possibly causing damage , and losing a ride day.

2 weeks ago , I had blown the seal on the air side , and lost most of the fluid. I took it into FC for a re-fresh , and whatever new part's I may need , like seals , bushing's ect... When I got it there , Jake mentioned that when I had mine originally done last year , I was on their " 1st generation " setup. He updated my forks and shock to 19' spec's , and then I opted to install their new performance kit. And holy shit.....that suspension on my 125 is some of the best suspension I've ever ridden with. Especially the fork's , as they felt " Planted " every where and felt great every where on the track. And the harder I rode it , the better it felt. I purposely over jumped a few things throughout the day , and couldn't believe how well it soaked things up. And high speed corner entrance over stutter's.......it stuck like velcro. I'm only pissed because I just now had this done! Wish I would have done it sooner!

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And there goes Jeffro. One of God's own prototypes. A super high-powered mutant of some kind never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die.

Pimpin' Ho's , Rollin' fatty's......drinkin' beers , beers , beers!! ~ Ja