So, the Altitude at SLC.........Advantage Tomac?

Related:
Create New Tag

5/17/2020 6:02 AM

Or will it not matter a bit?

I've always figured the guys who train in Florida were smart to do so from a heat/humidity worst case scenario - they aren't likely to race anywhere that will be worse.

Except that it can leave open the question of - how well do they deal with high altitude? But then the races at altitude are few & far between, right?

I personally have no experience with exerting myself to exhaustion, at high altitude.

I have seen seen several sporting events, though, where the commentators talked about it a lot (as in 'home' team is used to it, opponents aren't) and then late in the event, the opponents do look more gassed than the home team.

I'd imagine, in one SX event, altitude won't matter. But then 7 races in 21 days? That's a little different. Does it add up, considering recovery times & all?

So does it all result in a Tomac advantage, since he lives/trains at higher altitude?

Full, disclosure - I do want to see Tomac get an SX championship before he is done. But, I can say the exact same thing for Roczen too.

|

2016 YZ250X

5/17/2020 6:08 AM

Yes it's an advantage, but Roczen is still very capable of pulling this off at his level. Remember Baggett showing Tomac around the track at Thunder Valley in 2017?

|

5/17/2020 6:17 AM

Kenny beat Tomac at Thunder Valley (higher alt. than SLC) last year. I think they’ll all be fine.

|

5/17/2020 7:08 AM

It will probably be Anderson with the issue.

|

"Who cares about what other people think"

5/17/2020 7:14 AM

Anderson ... I hope he can make it through without any / much complications.

|

5/17/2020 7:18 AM

The 2 SX a week might be a bigger problem for some

|

5/17/2020 7:43 AM

I completely get that these are world class athletes and I'd be surprised to see any effects of high altitude in the 1st 2-3 races.

My question was more from a 7 races in 21 days perspective. My assumption is that even world class athletes, who don't live/train at high altitude, will need more than normal recovery time after a race before being ready to race again at high elevation. And instead, they race again in 3 days.

After they've done 3 races in 8 days, with shortened recovery time (when they needed extra recovery time), will it add up for some racers? Are they going to be lacking their normal stamina by races 5, 6, 7?

I'm just thinking of some brutal summer MX races, where a rider gives his all, does well, pukes when it's over and, when interviewed after the race the following weekend, says - yeah I over did it so much last weekend, that I couldn't get fully recovered this week, only able to ride 80-90% today.

I suppose it's just that the variables of A) 7 races/21 days and cool all races at about 4300 ft, that have me wondering. Both things unprecedented and will probably come down to hindsight to know if either mattered.

|

2016 YZ250X

5/17/2020 8:05 AM

Anytime Eli swings a leg over a bike, it's advantage Tomac.

|

5/17/2020 8:18 AM
Edited Date/Time: 5/17/2020 8:19 AM

Is altitude really that big of a deal? I live at 6500' and all my tracks are pretty close to that. The lowest I go is Turkey, TX at 2400' and the only thing I notice is that I'll nearly flip my bike the first time I hammer the throttle. When I come home after a weekend, I'm not out of breath or anything once I'm back home.

When I go hunting, I'm up to 8500-9000' and don't really notice any difference except my legs are screaming but what do you expect when you hike up and down mountains all day long?

|

2015 Kawasaki KX 250F
2015 GasGas TXT Racing 125
2015 Husqvarna TC 125
2018 KTM 150 XC-W

5/17/2020 9:16 AM

HighPlainsSquid wrote:

Is altitude really that big of a deal? I live at 6500' and all my tracks are pretty close to that. The lowest I go is Turkey, TX at 2400' and the only thing I notice is that I'll nearly flip my bike the first time I hammer the throttle. When I come home after a weekend, I'm not out of breath or anything once I'm back home.

When I go hunting, I'm up to 8500-9000' and don't really notice any difference except my legs are screaming but what do you expect when you hike up and down mountains all day long?

Your 2nd sentence says it. I live at around 300 ft, and drove out to Colorado, slept at 8000 ft, and tried to climb a small crest nearby the next morning and was struggling for breath big time, had to stop about every 20 feet or so. It got better after a couple days, but it is definitely a giant smack in the face if you aren't living in it.

|

5/17/2020 9:24 AM

KX500 wrote:

I completely get that these are world class athletes and I'd be surprised to see any effects of high altitude in the 1st 2-3 races.

My question was more from a 7 races in 21 days perspective. My assumption is that even world class athletes, who don't live/train at high altitude, will need more than normal recovery time after a race before being ready to race again at high elevation. And instead, they race again in 3 days.

After they've done 3 races in 8 days, with shortened recovery time (when they needed extra recovery time), will it add up for some racers? Are they going to be lacking their normal stamina by races 5, 6, 7?

I'm just thinking of some brutal summer MX races, where a rider gives his all, does well, pukes when it's over and, when interviewed after the race the following weekend, says - yeah I over did it so much last weekend, that I couldn't get fully recovered this week, only able to ride 80-90% today.

I suppose it's just that the variables of A) 7 races/21 days and cool all races at about 4300 ft, that have me wondering. Both things unprecedented and will probably come down to hindsight to know if either mattered.

You seen affects of Roczen in heat and it took him two or three weeks to recover.

Anyone who wants to discredit or “asterisk “ this season is talking nonsense. This is going to be an unprecedented challenging season ever.

|

5/17/2020 9:54 AM

davis224 wrote:

Your 2nd sentence says it. I live at around 300 ft, and drove out to Colorado, slept at 8000 ft, and tried to climb a small crest nearby the next morning and was struggling for breath big time, had to stop about every 20 feet or so. It got better after a couple days, but it is definitely a giant smack in the face if you aren't living in it.

I'm one of those dudes who gets ragingly nauseous anywhere above 4k feet of elevation. Without meds I feel like I am dying.

|

5/17/2020 10:28 AM

There's some pretty good discussion goin on in here. Nice!

1. Altitude: 4,637 ft (at the stadium)
2. Recovery: 2 days before Weds races. 3 days before Sunday races.
3. Weather: looks like mid-upper 70s/low 80s in the end of May an up to mid 90s by June 21.
4. Time away: on the ground SLC 5/28-29 & leave 6/21-23 (24 - 27 days) we can start calling that "a month".
5. Living standards: food, rest, training, recovery...any special needs for these requirements needs to be planned for logistically & need to be maintained for the duration.
6. Expenses: it's kinda hard to deny... it's gonna cost A LOT to relocate to SLC for "a month".
7. East versus West. West 250 doesn't need to be there until race 4 of 7 (I believe it's 3 East, 2 West, 1 East, Shootout)




* "A Month": 22 days of racing PLUS 2 days on the front-end PLUS flying or driving & you can do the same on the back-end. Flight availability isn't normal...in-fact, it's pretty thin out there. I'm guessing plenty of west- coasters will drive. Either way, you can add a day or two on the back-end: now we're at 26-28 days. Again, all personnel must be there 2 days early plus travel time. It's a month.

|

I ripped a start from Egypt and I was happy about that.

5/17/2020 10:29 AM

One race over one day, it's a completely other story.

Beyond training, obviously people aren't equal when it comes to this.

7 high intensity pro-races in 21 days at 4600ft (when the "Floridian" live and train at 100ft), even for pro-athletes it will be a factor.

|

5/17/2020 11:37 AM

The altitude is not the only factor. The low humidity compounds the altitude. I live around 5,000ft and train 4500-7000 daily. Very similar to SLC. When people come here to visit from low, humid places they feel it. You can "gut it out" for a few days but on extended stays you might experience cracked lips, nose bleed, and persistent dehydration that is hard to overcome. The arid air is literally sucking the moisture out of you 24/7 but you don't notice it because you do not see liquid sweat on yourself. The West/SW is also in the most arid time of year right now before the monsoon arrives in a few months.

|

Powerband in every gear !

5/17/2020 11:48 AM

I’ll bet most of them just stay out there until all the races are complete.

|

5/17/2020 11:51 AM
Edited Date/Time: 5/17/2020 11:52 AM

FGR01 wrote:

The altitude is not the only factor. The low humidity compounds the altitude. I live around 5,000ft and train 4500-7000 daily. Very similar to SLC. When people come here to visit from low, humid places they feel it. You can "gut it out" for a few days but on extended stays you might experience cracked lips, nose bleed, and persistent dehydration that is hard to overcome. The arid air is literally sucking the moisture out of you 24/7 but you don't notice it because you do not see liquid sweat on yourself. The West/SW is also in the most arid time of year right now before the monsoon arrives in a few months.

This.
Somebody for sure will have problems. I hope not roczen or eli.
If i were eli or roczar i'de be already in slc

|

5/17/2020 11:59 AM

If I had to guess Roczen is packing up his stuff as we speak or he's already in Utah. Afaik he has a house there - his wife is from Utah.
Hope altitude isn't going to play a role in this title fight.

|

5/17/2020 12:00 PM

The advantage goes to the riders who have been working the last 2 and half months. It's just like A1 and guys that come out ready.

|

5/17/2020 12:03 PM

HighPlainsSquid wrote:

Is altitude really that big of a deal? I live at 6500' and all my tracks are pretty close to that. The lowest I go is Turkey, TX at 2400' and the only thing I notice is that I'll nearly flip my bike the first time I hammer the throttle. When I come home after a weekend, I'm not out of breath or anything once I'm back home.

When I go hunting, I'm up to 8500-9000' and don't really notice any difference except my legs are screaming but what do you expect when you hike up and down mountains all day long?

hunting's a good comparison

|

5/17/2020 12:09 PM
Edited Date/Time: 5/17/2020 12:10 PM

mb60 wrote:

The advantage goes to the riders who have been working the last 2 and half months. It's just like A1 and guys that come out ready.

Should we expect barcia battling for the win? Since it's like A1... he should be up frint.
Maybe destryoing tomac in the first corner he can?
Giving roczen the title easily?
😁😁😁😁i fucking love motocross.

|

5/17/2020 12:22 PM

MZ193 wrote:

Should we expect barcia battling for the win? Since it's like A1... he should be up frint.
Maybe destryoing tomac in the first corner he can?
Giving roczen the title easily?
😁😁😁😁i fucking love motocross.

Not sure but riders using working on bike set up issues should stay quite. Also hate to use a football quote but riding hurt and being injured will bring on new meaning as well.

|

5/17/2020 1:50 PM

I’m not trying to challenge the legitimacy of it but it is hard for me to understand Anderson having issues in SLC related to altitude when he’s from Albuquerque which is 1,000 feet higher in elevation.

|

5/17/2020 2:07 PM
Edited Date/Time: 5/17/2020 2:10 PM

Legit question. Yes, very possible. But so much can happen that I don't think it will be the deciding factor at all. Starts, competitors, racing incidents, crashes, and staight up raw speed will probably account for 99% of the outcome. I predict Tomac, but everything is possible, any bad start and not finding his groove can as much crown Roczen ... or Tomac. Tomac seems to move more easily in the pack, but he doesn't find his rythm all the time, whereas Roczen seems to be a better starter but seems to be more unconfortable to make moves if mid pack. Both are very deserving so I will be cheering for both anyway.

|

5/17/2020 2:23 PM

731chopper wrote:

I’m not trying to challenge the legitimacy of it but it is hard for me to understand Anderson having issues in SLC related to altitude when he’s from Albuquerque which is 1,000 feet higher in elevation.

I spent plenty of time at 7000 plus feet as a kid, now it makes me want to puke and die without medication, which WADA won't approve for Jason.

|

5/17/2020 2:37 PM

Everyone racing has to stay in SLC for the 3 weeks of racing and if they leave SLC and come back they are quarantined for 48 hours. All riders have a choice of staying at 4 different hotels. As for the race the rider gets a mechanic and 1 “visitor”.

|

5/17/2020 2:38 PM

crusty_xx wrote:

If I had to guess Roczen is packing up his stuff as we speak or he's already in Utah. Afaik he has a house there - his wife is from Utah.
Hope altitude isn't going to play a role in this title fight.

I’d say that most of the top 10 should already be near there and at least riding even if they aren’t actually doing motos for training yet....

|

5/17/2020 2:52 PM

TOMAC *

|

5/17/2020 3:12 PM

GUY B.
I HATE the thumbs UP / thumbs DOWN
It would make me not want to post anything anymore.

What do you think...?

|

5/17/2020 3:23 PM

I think that it will be a factor without question. Altitude, the dry air, and so many races in such a short time will make it grueling.

|