Sleep apnea/ mx

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9/16/2018 3:31 PM

Well after feeling like hell for the last year and a half and 50+ doctors visits they finally figured out i have this. Do any of you guys have this at all. If so im interested in how things changed after you got on the machine. Next weds im going to get one and am hoping things might get back to what they once were.

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9/16/2018 3:45 PM

I have been using 1 for about 4 months now. I used to wake up feeling dead tired all the time and now feel actually refreshed 80% of the time so that’s a positive. I am dreaming again and have not dreamt for years and they say that dreaming is very good for you and your brain.
It does take a bit to get used to, I felt like I was drowning from to much air at first but have adjusted the air flow and everything is good.

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9/16/2018 3:49 PM

It's a life changer and life saver. Until I got mine I was sleeping in another room. My wife was very concerned for me and then she began to suffer sleep deprivation. This is common for spouses of people with apnea. The first night I slept with it in another room my wife came in to see if I was alive. I slept 8 hours where before I was only sleeping 6 and feeling like shit in the morning.

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The older I get, the faster I was.

9/16/2018 4:00 PM

bsharkey wrote:

Well after feeling like hell for the last year and a half and 50+ doctors visits they finally figured out i have this. Do any of you guys have this at all. If so im interested in how things changed after you got on the machine. Next weds im going to get one and am hoping things might get back to what they once were.

Pay attention to the first morning you wake up using the machine... It will be the best you have ever felt.
Your body does alot of recovery while in rem sleep so not sleeping properly for years will make a huge negitive impact.. Life changer fosho (after you get used to it)

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9/16/2018 4:15 PM
Edited Date/Time: 9/16/2018 4:17 PM

Yeah my wifes never gets sleep for sure. Alot of nights trying to sleep on the couch hoping i might sleep better between her waking me up and the problem itself. It's been pretty crazy for the last year-and-a-half I wake up in the mornings feel tired. Id be driving home in the early afternoon and feel like I would fall asleep driving my car on the way home. I try and ride my dirt bike only to go out and be disappointed maybe ride a couple laps and be done. It really took the doctors a long time to rule out all these other things then I was talking to a Cardiologist one day told him how I woke up in the mornings and just felt exhausted even after sleeping all night or at least I thought I was sleeping

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9/16/2018 4:19 PM

jjavaman wrote:

I have been using 1 for about 4 months now. I used to wake up feeling dead tired all the time and now feel actually refreshed 80% of the time so that’s a positive. I am dreaming again and have not dreamt for years and they say that dreaming is very good for you and your brain.
It does take a bit to get used to, I felt like I was drowning from to much air at first but have adjusted the air flow and everything is good.

When I was in my hospital for my overnight stay they tried test fitting me with a couple different ones and let me wear it for a while I must say it did feel weird hopefully I can adjust to it quick

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9/16/2018 5:14 PM

My wife was using the machine and switched to just the mouth piece ,that may be an option also.

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9/16/2018 5:34 PM
Edited Date/Time: 9/16/2018 5:39 PM

I've been using one for almost two years now and it has been the best thing I ever did.
I never thought I had sleep apnea because other than snoring I didn't really have any symptoms, but it would keep my wife up all night. I never really felt tired or unrested in the mornings (or at least didn't think I did)
I went and got tested and I had mild sleep apnea but my father had heart issues and that always worried me seeing that I have three children under 10, and long term it's hard on your heart.

So I reluctantly got a CPAP machine, once I got use to sleeping with it though it's been amazing. I get 8hrs a night of deep rested sleep and now I realize how bad of sleep I was getting before having one.

At first I was almost embarrassed to tell people that I had a CPAP machine, but one of my buddies is a firefighter and he was saying half of the guys he works with use though. Now anytime one of my buddy's wives complaining about their husbands snoring the first thing I tell them is to go get checked.

I think the biggest win is my wife is well rested too and is less likely to want to kill me in my sleep now because of snoring....lol

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9/16/2018 7:09 PM

Been using one for over 10 tears.

Get a mask you feel comfortable with.

When I first started they gave me "nose pillows". God they were aweful. I had to wear them so tight I woke up feeling like I had been hanging on a,meat hook. Switched to a nose mask, but I have a mustache and never could get it to seal, finally got a full face mask and it was bliss as long as I kept a fairly fresh strap.

Once you get used to it, go without it one night and you will wake up feeling like absolute crap. I get terrible headaches.

If you have good insurance, get setup somewhere to get new supplies regularly (hoses, filters, masks, straps) even if you don't actually need them. Stock pile them in case your insurance changes.

The only bad thing about the machines is that you have to have a prescription for them so everything is ridiculously overpriced. It borders on a scam.

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9/16/2018 7:54 PM

I have it and was unable to get used to various masks so I ended up getting a prescription for modafinil and the stuff is awesome. Unfortunately my new insurance does not cover it so I have gone back to trying to get used to a mask. I have had the best luck with nose pillows.

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"Who cares about what other people think"

9/16/2018 8:22 PM

Myke wrote:

I have it and was unable to get used to various masks so I ended up getting a prescription for modafinil and the stuff is awesome. Unfortunately my new insurance does not cover it so I have gone back to trying to get used to a mask. I have had the best luck with nose pillows.

That seems so dumb. Why wouldnt insurance cover something to prolong your life. The longer you live the more you pay them.

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9/16/2018 9:10 PM

Recently tested and diagnosed with mild sleep apnea. No history of snoring, but often felt super tired even after 8 hours of sleep. Just did a five night trial with a CPAP machine. It was so quite I couldn't even hear it. Had no problems getting used to it, and DEFINITELY felt more rested in the morning. Counting down the days for my own CPAP machine to be delivered. It can't come soon enough.

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9/16/2018 9:16 PM

Mine is really quiet. My wife can barely hear it. It is odd sleeping with it at first but once your used to it is a life changer. I recommend it to anyone who needs it.

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9/17/2018 5:34 AM
Edited Date/Time: 9/17/2018 8:02 AM

sleep apnea is very serious actually. two types, obstructive (tongue closing off airway) and central (chemo-receptors not working properly, not signaling spontaneous respiration’s while sleeping). most people have obstructive sleep apnea. many people hate wearing the CPAP mask at night because of how uncomfortable it is, but let me explain the importance...

when you sleep and you’re snoring, you’re essentially starving your body of oxygen. many people who have OSA feel tired during the day and don’t sleep well at night. this is because while they are “sleeping” and lacking their body of oxygen, every organ in the body is being starved of oxygen and each organ has to work extra hard to do it’s job. so while you think you’re sleeping, your body at a physiological level is actually working harder to do it’s job then while you’re awake. this in turn essentially keeps your body from getting the rest it needs, the rest you THINK you’re getting at night. hence, why people are so tired during the day when they’re awake. i’d say 95% of my patients after using cpap/bipap for ONE month consistently, after experiencing the positive effects such as better nights rest and energy during the day, wouldn’t sleep another night of their life without the machine. the results far outweigh the uncomfortable mask. keep in mind their are different masks to try out. many people don’t realize how serious it is to starve your organs of oxygen, they just think the problem is how loud they snore at night. most actually think it’s like a joke...or funny, how they keep their significant other up at night.

there’s another aspect that many don’t know, and that is the ventilation aspect to your breathing. breathing not only brings in oxygen, but it also releases carbon dioxide. many OSA pts stop breathing essentially, and they don’t release the C02 adequately. many times people are very hard to wake up at night and this is due to hypercarbia, high C02 levels. this is also dangerous.

so when you’re tired during the day, that’s because last night when you thought you were sleeping, your body was actually in overdrive trying to compensate for the lack of oxygen it was getting, and stressing every major organ. this can take years off of your life, your body needs to oxygenate and ventilate adequately, especially at night so the body can rest. sleeping at night without CPAP/BIPAP with osa is like running a marathon with no oxygen.

cpap stands for continuous positive airway pressure. regardless of when you breathe, there is a consistent pressure being pushed into your airways, stenting at the very least, your tongue from the back of your throat. this keeps your airways open so you can oxygenate and ventilate. there’s a bit more to it but that’s the gist. there’s also bipap, two separate pressures. the first pressure is your cpap pressure that’s always being pushed into you regardless of when you breathe. the other pressure level is for when you take a breathe. this pressure is given when the machine senses negative pressure from you “sucking in” to breathe. this pressure is over top of the bottom cpap pressure. for example. 10/5 bipap is 10 of pressure support over top of the constant 5 pressure. total airway pressure of 15. this is measured in centimeters of water (cmH2O). the breath is a pressure supported breathe. this helps you to create a larger tidal volume breath, a breathe that is large enough to open and distribute the oxygen to your lungs. most people are given cpap over bipap because they don’t need that pressure supported breathe that bipap gives to create a large, or rather, adequate breath. most can do it on their own.

if you have osa, wear your mask, it will change your life!

sorry if this info has already been explained, i didn’t read all comments.

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9/17/2018 6:09 AM
Edited Date/Time: 9/17/2018 6:10 AM

Agreed, its a game changer. I have been on machines for almost 10 years now. I just got a new machine that works much more quite than my older cpap. Most of the new ones are apap, which just means the pressure automatically adjusts to your requirements. If I go 2 nights without mine I am totally useless now...

A fan or white noise machine will negate any noise. If a spouse can't deal with that small amount of noise to extend the partners life I would be concerned about that lol!

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9/17/2018 6:37 AM

sgrimmxdad wrote:

Agreed, its a game changer. I have been on machines for almost 10 years now. I just got a new machine that works much more quite than my older cpap. Most of the new ones are apap, which just means the pressure automatically adjusts to your requirements. If I go 2 nights without mine I am totally useless now...

A fan or white noise machine will negate any noise. If a spouse can't deal with that small amount of noise to extend the partners life I would be concerned about that lol!

yes, there are quite a few machines that have rather smart settings and modes that can make changes from breath to breath. some companies can even make changes to machines wirelessly. machines and masks are getting much smarter and more comfortable then they were even 5 years ago.

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9/17/2018 7:55 AM

Agreed absolute life changer.

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9/17/2018 8:27 AM
Edited Date/Time: 9/17/2018 8:28 AM

Another added benefit that I noticed is that I don’t get colds in the winter like I use too, and when I do they don’t last very long and I still get a good nights rest. Which I use to never get when I’d have a cold because I couldn’t sleep from being congested from the cold.

Now with a CPAP machine I just turn up the humidity and the air temp and it kind of just powers through being stuffed up and I still get a solid nights sleep and colds last only a day or two.

I don’t know if this is the same for anyone else?

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9/17/2018 9:45 AM

Not being able to sleep through the night or feeling well rested is usually why I don’t go to ride. Just in a bad mood and last thing I want to do is travel a few hours. Mine may just be stress and anxiety, idk?

Ghost

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9/17/2018 10:08 AM

Ghostrider145 wrote:

Not being able to sleep through the night or feeling well rested is usually why I don’t go to ride. Just in a bad mood and last thing I want to do is travel a few hours. Mine may just be stress and anxiety, idk?

Ghost

Go get tested

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9/17/2018 10:10 AM

I started using one two weeks ago. I have to agree with the phrase "life changing". I had no idea until now what it is like to wake up feeling rested and refreshed. I rode yesterday but I didn't feel any different on the bike. That may change over time. I really don't know for sure. I do know that I feel better than I have felt in years and I only had a mild case of OSA.

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Bret Bonham

9/17/2018 10:26 AM

As has been said, life changer if you can get on with it

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9/17/2018 10:55 AM

I have had one along time. Can’t sleep with out one now and if I do I wake up with a sore throat.
I used to be so fucking tired all the time. Could fall a sleep anywhere. I’d just be sitting there and pass out, soon as the car turned off if I didn’t get out I’d fall asleep.
I remember one time trail riding and was so tired I couldnt ride, pulled off side of trail and took a nap in the bushes?
I can tell you it would suck to have if single... explain that one to the new girl. And if you ask around seems like 50% of people I know use them... just not talked about.

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9/17/2018 3:51 PM

Been using CPAP since 1999...its a game changer. I absolutely hate everything about it except how much better I feel. I travel a lot for work and it sucks to travel with it. But on overseas travel i actually use it on the plane. I'm married so its no problem...but i can only imagine bringing a girl home and having to wear a mask....

Bottom line though, if you've been diagnosed with sleep apnea, use it! Otherwise You risk serious permanent damage to your heart.

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9/17/2018 8:29 PM

holtergeist797 wrote:

sleep apnea is very serious actually. two types, obstructive (tongue closing off airway) and central (chemo-receptors not working properly, not signaling spontaneous respiration’s while sleeping). most people have obstructive sleep apnea. many people hate wearing the CPAP mask at night because of how uncomfortable it is, but let me explain the importance...

when you sleep and you’re snoring, you’re essentially starving your body of oxygen. many people who have OSA feel tired during the day and don’t sleep well at night. this is because while they are “sleeping” and lacking their body of oxygen, every organ in the body is being starved of oxygen and each organ has to work extra hard to do it’s job. so while you think you’re sleeping, your body at a physiological level is actually working harder to do it’s job then while you’re awake. this in turn essentially keeps your body from getting the rest it needs, the rest you THINK you’re getting at night. hence, why people are so tired during the day when they’re awake. i’d say 95% of my patients after using cpap/bipap for ONE month consistently, after experiencing the positive effects such as better nights rest and energy during the day, wouldn’t sleep another night of their life without the machine. the results far outweigh the uncomfortable mask. keep in mind their are different masks to try out. many people don’t realize how serious it is to starve your organs of oxygen, they just think the problem is how loud they snore at night. most actually think it’s like a joke...or funny, how they keep their significant other up at night.

there’s another aspect that many don’t know, and that is the ventilation aspect to your breathing. breathing not only brings in oxygen, but it also releases carbon dioxide. many OSA pts stop breathing essentially, and they don’t release the C02 adequately. many times people are very hard to wake up at night and this is due to hypercarbia, high C02 levels. this is also dangerous.

so when you’re tired during the day, that’s because last night when you thought you were sleeping, your body was actually in overdrive trying to compensate for the lack of oxygen it was getting, and stressing every major organ. this can take years off of your life, your body needs to oxygenate and ventilate adequately, especially at night so the body can rest. sleeping at night without CPAP/BIPAP with osa is like running a marathon with no oxygen.

cpap stands for continuous positive airway pressure. regardless of when you breathe, there is a consistent pressure being pushed into your airways, stenting at the very least, your tongue from the back of your throat. this keeps your airways open so you can oxygenate and ventilate. there’s a bit more to it but that’s the gist. there’s also bipap, two separate pressures. the first pressure is your cpap pressure that’s always being pushed into you regardless of when you breathe. the other pressure level is for when you take a breathe. this pressure is given when the machine senses negative pressure from you “sucking in” to breathe. this pressure is over top of the bottom cpap pressure. for example. 10/5 bipap is 10 of pressure support over top of the constant 5 pressure. total airway pressure of 15. this is measured in centimeters of water (cmH2O). the breath is a pressure supported breathe. this helps you to create a larger tidal volume breath, a breathe that is large enough to open and distribute the oxygen to your lungs. most people are given cpap over bipap because they don’t need that pressure supported breathe that bipap gives to create a large, or rather, adequate breath. most can do it on their own.

if you have osa, wear your mask, it will change your life!

sorry if this info has already been explained, i didn’t read all comments.

Thanks alot. 2 more days til.i get my machine. Cant wait

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9/17/2018 9:54 PM

The grim reaper or an undertaker must be in here to "thumbs down" the nice explanation.

Thanks for the explanation.

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9/18/2018 12:01 AM

Is this issue more prevalent with folks that are overweight or does your physical condition a non-factor?

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9/18/2018 3:56 AM

Does nose breathing help the obstructed one?

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9/18/2018 5:09 AM

holtergeist797 wrote:

sleep apnea is very serious actually. two types, obstructive (tongue closing off airway) and central (chemo-receptors not working properly, not signaling spontaneous respiration’s while sleeping). most people have obstructive sleep apnea. many people hate wearing the CPAP mask at night because of how uncomfortable it is, but let me explain the importance...

when you sleep and you’re snoring, you’re essentially starving your body of oxygen. many people who have OSA feel tired during the day and don’t sleep well at night. this is because while they are “sleeping” and lacking their body of oxygen, every organ in the body is being starved of oxygen and each organ has to work extra hard to do it’s job. so while you think you’re sleeping, your body at a physiological level is actually working harder to do it’s job then while you’re awake. this in turn essentially keeps your body from getting the rest it needs, the rest you THINK you’re getting at night. hence, why people are so tired during the day when they’re awake. i’d say 95% of my patients after using cpap/bipap for ONE month consistently, after experiencing the positive effects such as better nights rest and energy during the day, wouldn’t sleep another night of their life without the machine. the results far outweigh the uncomfortable mask. keep in mind their are different masks to try out. many people don’t realize how serious it is to starve your organs of oxygen, they just think the problem is how loud they snore at night. most actually think it’s like a joke...or funny, how they keep their significant other up at night.

there’s another aspect that many don’t know, and that is the ventilation aspect to your breathing. breathing not only brings in oxygen, but it also releases carbon dioxide. many OSA pts stop breathing essentially, and they don’t release the C02 adequately. many times people are very hard to wake up at night and this is due to hypercarbia, high C02 levels. this is also dangerous.

so when you’re tired during the day, that’s because last night when you thought you were sleeping, your body was actually in overdrive trying to compensate for the lack of oxygen it was getting, and stressing every major organ. this can take years off of your life, your body needs to oxygenate and ventilate adequately, especially at night so the body can rest. sleeping at night without CPAP/BIPAP with osa is like running a marathon with no oxygen.

cpap stands for continuous positive airway pressure. regardless of when you breathe, there is a consistent pressure being pushed into your airways, stenting at the very least, your tongue from the back of your throat. this keeps your airways open so you can oxygenate and ventilate. there’s a bit more to it but that’s the gist. there’s also bipap, two separate pressures. the first pressure is your cpap pressure that’s always being pushed into you regardless of when you breathe. the other pressure level is for when you take a breathe. this pressure is given when the machine senses negative pressure from you “sucking in” to breathe. this pressure is over top of the bottom cpap pressure. for example. 10/5 bipap is 10 of pressure support over top of the constant 5 pressure. total airway pressure of 15. this is measured in centimeters of water (cmH2O). the breath is a pressure supported breathe. this helps you to create a larger tidal volume breath, a breathe that is large enough to open and distribute the oxygen to your lungs. most people are given cpap over bipap because they don’t need that pressure supported breathe that bipap gives to create a large, or rather, adequate breath. most can do it on their own.

if you have osa, wear your mask, it will change your life!

sorry if this info has already been explained, i didn’t read all comments.

My brother has this, and I'm pretty sure I do too.
I'm going to look into getting the sleep study done.

Think this could be the reason I have major tendinopathy issues?
Lack of oxygen to heal?

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9/18/2018 5:21 AM

soopah noviss wrote:

Is this issue more prevalent with folks that are overweight or does your physical condition a non-factor?

Neck size specifically, more than just "overweight", although the two are usually related.

But I know a couple of people who are fairly competitive runners with about size 15 necks who have apnea too, so neck size isn't an automatic determiner. Anyone who has ever mentioned to me that they are being referred for a sleep study has been diagnosed with apnea, and I suspect that's close to the norm. By the time you've suffered from it enough to get tested, it's probably pretty obvious to the docs.

As the previous poster mentioned about the excess CO2 levels, sometimes you'll see an apnea sufferer with a grey skin tone, and when they go on cpap therapy they actually begin to look human again. My wife's uncle was that way, looked like cement before he was diagnosed. Didn't see him for the first 2 months after he started using his cpap, almost didn't recognize him the first time we were together afterwards.

I need to use mine more diligently. I just have a terrible time getting to sleep with anything near my nose, so in order to use it I often have to take ambien, and that sucks too.

This thread just convinced me to do another 30 nights straight, to try to get back in the habit.

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