Road Bikes That won't break the bank

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9/6/2018 10:46 AM

I'd like to get into road biking for cross training. Where would I look and how much would I need to spend to get a decent bike out there. I don't have a lot to spend but I also don't want to be the laughing stalk riding around on a hunk of S**T. Who's got the tips?

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9/6/2018 10:58 AM

You can get into a used aluminum bike for $300-600 that's not with many good things on them. For about a grand you can find an entry level carbon bike used which will have mid-level components on them most of the time. Giant bikes seem to be found used pretty easily and some of them are good bikes.

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9/6/2018 10:59 AM
Edited Date/Time: 9/6/2018 11:09 AM

Ya, look at lightly used or closeouts

I have a Marin cx bike that is sweet and retail was like $2500 I think. Carbon bike with disc brakes and 105 components.

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9/6/2018 11:04 AM

I'm a huge fan of my Cannondale CAAD10. I paid like 1700 new on closeout and have put thousands of miles on it. You can find them used all day long in the 600-1000 range. Throw some nice parts on it here and there and it'll be lighter than the low price carbon stuff. Same goes for the new CAAD12 version out there.

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9/6/2018 11:27 AM

Most of the big guys (Specialized, Trek, Giant, etc) have entry level road bikes that are around the $800 mark. You could probably go to bikesdirect.com and get something even cheaper, but you're going to need to assemble yourself, and you're on your own as far as service/warranty. Then, you could also check craigslist or facebook marketplace. I have road bikes that pop-up on my feed almost weekly.

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9/6/2018 11:28 AM

buying a few year old used road bike is always a good investment as long as its been taken care of. You can find good deals from people who buy new bikes every year or two. Much like motorcycles you can find super anal PO's who take really good care of their stuff. 4-600 is a good starting point, if you can go higher, then great. not needed to get started though. Fit is the biggest issue. Don't buy a bike that doesn't fit you, no matter how good of a deal it is.

Be careful buying used carbon unless you have someone to help you look over the bike. I am not saying dont do it, just be cautious.

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9/6/2018 11:40 AM

I found a KHS Flight 300 for $400. Anyone know anything about these?

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9/6/2018 12:28 PM

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9/6/2018 12:46 PM

Sept of 2015 I purchased a 15' Fuji Gran Fondo carbon endurance bike at Performance Bike with Shimano 105 components for $1500 OTD on a triple points weekend and got $450 in points to spend. I bought my helmet, shoes, pedals, bib/jersey kit, water bottles, bottle cages off those points and still had points left over. The bike is awesome and don't have any plans of getting rid of it anytime soon.

This spring I went back and bought a full suspension GT Helion mtn bike on a double points weekend and got almost $300 again (I had just missed the triple points weekend a little earlier in the year).

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9/6/2018 12:52 PM

I had a Cannondale for quite a while, good bike for sure, will hold up well, and can find a lot of places to work on it if you're not the kind to do the work yourself.

I got a BMC a few years back and I couldn't be happier. The Team machine or Road machine models are great even at the SLR02 and SLR03 models.

And i will echo a few posts above, finding one that is a year old is a good way to great some great pricing on bikes.

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9/6/2018 12:58 PM

I picked up a decent specialized pretty reasonable for my daughter last year, alum frame carbon fork decent components for $350 with brand new tires from a guy that buys new every couple years

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kcco

9/6/2018 1:03 PM

Sacko wrote:

I found a KHS Flight 300 for $400. Anyone know anything about these?

new is only $650. thats not a mega deal.

https://khsbicycles.com/05_flite_300_07.htm

i think the easiest way to do this is decide what your budget is. i'm a big fan of finding a clean used $2k bike for around a grand.

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9/6/2018 1:35 PM

I recommend buying a good condition bike used if you are just getting into it. I bought my Scott Foil 20 used in perfect condition for $1000. Its full carbon fiber and weighs 16lbs.



For a while i rode a KHS Urban Xpress commuter bike. Even though it was a heavy, inefficient pig, i still got great workouts riding it. That being said, my riding has gotten more serious and I'm 20% faster on the Scott Foil according to my Strava times. Its much easier to go longer distances when you have a proper bike.


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9/6/2018 2:22 PM

theycallmeebryan wrote:

I recommend buying a good condition bike used if you are just getting into it. I bought my Scott Foil 20 used in perfect condition for $1000. Its full carbon fiber and weighs 16lbs.



For a while i rode a KHS Urban Xpress commuter bike. Even though it was a heavy, inefficient pig, i still got great workouts riding it. That being said, my riding has gotten more serious and I'm 20% faster on the Scott Foil according to my Strava times. Its much easier to go longer distances when you have a proper bike.


The real question is, did you get faster on the MX Bike when you got a nicer road bike?

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9/6/2018 2:25 PM

TSCHAM101 wrote:

The real question is, did you get faster on the MX Bike when you got a nicer road bike?

I wouldn't say faster, but my endurance on the MX bike has definitely improved since road cycling longer distances and more often. That, and i'm training for a century (100 miles) for a cancer fundraiser in November.

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9/6/2018 2:41 PM

get a gravel bike instead (not cyclocross but the newer, gravel bikes). you can go places a roadbike can't, but it's still a road bike, so very versatile. nothing like getting miles in on gravel roads, and no traffic

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9/6/2018 2:54 PM

jonesaustin wrote:

get a gravel bike instead (not cyclocross but the newer, gravel bikes). you can go places a roadbike can't, but it's still a road bike, so very versatile. nothing like getting miles in on gravel roads, and no traffic

I agree with this guy. I’ve been riding a Canondale Slate for the past year and a half. Really hard to define this bike other than to say it’s fast on the road and surprisingly off road capable. Go on the cannondale site and check it out. The low end is in the $1500 range. I see them on eBay at good prices.

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9/6/2018 2:58 PM

If you want to see what other Vital MX members (and staff) are up to with their cycling activities...

https://www.strava.com/clubs/vitalmx

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9/6/2018 3:00 PM

GuyB wrote:

If you want to see what other Vital MX members (and staff) are up to with their cycling activities...

https://www.strava.com/clubs/vitalmx

Sweet! Didn't know vital had a club. Joined!

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9/6/2018 3:03 PM
Edited Date/Time: 9/6/2018 3:03 PM

theycallmeebryan wrote:

Sweet! Didn't know vital had a club. Joined!

Cool. We also do a lunch ride on Tuesdays and Thursdays in Irvine where we meet up with some of the gang from Fox and Answer/Pro Taper.

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9/6/2018 3:05 PM

GuyB wrote:

Cool. We also do a lunch ride on Tuesdays and Thursdays in Irvine where we meet up with some of the gang from Fox and Answer/Pro Taper.

Haha, 2 problems with that. One being Irvine is a haul from San Diego at lunch time, and the other being I don't have a mountain bike (yet... )

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9/6/2018 3:10 PM
Edited Date/Time: 9/6/2018 3:12 PM

I think first we need to know what, " I don't have a lot to spend" means in dollars.

Used or new, don't buy the cheapest bike and don't buy a groupset lower than shimano 105. Aluminum bikes will ride harsh even with a carbon fork. In order to get the gains, you'll need to spend some quality time in the saddle. A compliant carbon frame is your friend, as is a good pair of cycling shorts and a comfy saddle.

Take a look at Canyon if you want to buy a bike with the best bang for your buck. A carbon Endurace with 105 and disc brakes is only $1999. The comparable Trek, Specialized, Giant, Cannondale is going to be $500-$1500 more.

https://www.canyon.com/en-us/road/endurace/endurace-cf-sl-disc-7-0

Spend the money on a good saddle. A good saddle is gonna run you between $100-200. Also get a bike fit. Best money you can spend.

Finally, look for an endurance frame not a sport or racing frame. You'll be more upright and the ride will be a little more plush.

If the bike isn't comfortable to ride, you will find every excuse not to ride it.

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9/6/2018 3:23 PM

theycallmeebryan wrote:

Haha, 2 problems with that. One being Irvine is a haul from San Diego at lunch time, and the other being I don't have a mountain bike (yet... )

The lunch ride is only on the road...except when the ride leader gets adventurous and drags us onto some gravel or dirt trails.

I usually try to get my mountain bike rides in during the summer when I'm touring the country covering the Nationals. But due to a few different factors conspiring against me (mostly ultra-hot or wet weather and getting the podcasts up and running), I didn't ride nearly as much as in previous years.

I'm paying for it now, but the fitness is coming back and I'm not quite so far behind the pack. This time of year is my boot camp. Meaning I'm booting myself in the butt for not riding enough all summer and eating too much KFC.

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9/6/2018 3:27 PM

Zaugg wrote:

I think first we need to know what, " I don't have a lot to spend" means in dollars.

Used or new, don't buy the cheapest bike and don't buy a groupset lower than shimano 105. Aluminum bikes will ride harsh even with a carbon fork. In order to get the gains, you'll need to spend some quality time in the saddle. A compliant carbon frame is your friend, as is a good pair of cycling shorts and a comfy saddle.

Take a look at Canyon if you want to buy a bike with the best bang for your buck. A carbon Endurace with 105 and disc brakes is only $1999. The comparable Trek, Specialized, Giant, Cannondale is going to be $500-$1500 more.

https://www.canyon.com/en-us/road/endurace/endurace-cf-sl-disc-7-0

Spend the money on a good saddle. A good saddle is gonna run you between $100-200. Also get a bike fit. Best money you can spend.

Finally, look for an endurance frame not a sport or racing frame. You'll be more upright and the ride will be a little more plush.

If the bike isn't comfortable to ride, you will find every excuse not to ride it.

Good stuff, B. And don't forget a helmet, glasses, and water bottles.

In Utah, I did a ride early this summer where and I ran out of water two-and-a-half hours into a four-hour ride...in mid-80s weather. With a mix of heat exhaustion and dehydration, I paid for it for a week or so.

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9/6/2018 3:28 PM

GuyB wrote:

The lunch ride is only on the road...except when the ride leader gets adventurous and drags us onto some gravel or dirt trails.

I usually try to get my mountain bike rides in during the summer when I'm touring the country covering the Nationals. But due to a few different factors conspiring against me (mostly ultra-hot or wet weather and getting the podcasts up and running), I didn't ride nearly as much as in previous years.

I'm paying for it now, but the fitness is coming back and I'm not quite so far behind the pack. This time of year is my boot camp. Meaning I'm booting myself in the butt for not riding enough all summer and eating too much KFC.

You're doing it wrong! You should be planning your trips to KFC to be the midway stops on your cycling routes! And i'm not suggesting take the direct, 3 mile route to the KFC. Make it a 15 mile route to the KFC, chow down, and then you'll set records on the way back.

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9/6/2018 3:30 PM

theycallmeebryan wrote:

You're doing it wrong! You should be planning your trips to KFC to be the midway stops on your cycling routes! And i'm not suggesting take the direct, 3 mile route to the KFC. Make it a 15 mile route to the KFC, chow down, and then you'll set records on the way back.

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9/6/2018 3:39 PM

GuyB wrote:

If you want to see what other Vital MX members (and staff) are up to with their cycling activities...

https://www.strava.com/clubs/vitalmx

Im a runner, can I join too or is it just being kept for cyclists?

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9/6/2018 3:41 PM

Kx125rider wrote:

Im a runner, can I join too or is it just being kept for cyclists?

As far as I'm concerned, the more the merrier.

There are times when I wish running and I were compatible. I just get shin splints really bad. It's like the worst case of arm pump ever, just on my shins.

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9/6/2018 3:55 PM

GuyB wrote:

As far as I'm concerned, the more the merrier.

There are times when I wish running and I were compatible. I just get shin splints really bad. It's like the worst case of arm pump ever, just on my shins.

Haha awesome I just joined

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9/6/2018 4:12 PM
Edited Date/Time: 9/6/2018 4:16 PM

GuyB wrote:

Good stuff, B. And don't forget a helmet, glasses, and water bottles.

In Utah, I did a ride early this summer where and I ran out of water two-and-a-half hours into a four-hour ride...in mid-80s weather. With a mix of heat exhaustion and dehydration, I paid for it for a week or so.

Was hoping the helmet was a given but good call on glasses and water bottles. Good shoes and carrying a spare tube/ C02 cartridge, also a good idea.

I definitely feel your pain regarding the water bottle deal. That almost happened to me this summer when we hit triple digits. Nothing like drinking hot water when your thirsty mid-ride.

Gonna try to make it to the office sometime after MEC to hit the lunch loop with the old crew...maybe some Newport Coast. haha

I'll hit you up in advance. Just need an excuse to head into the OC.

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