Riding while exhausted advice

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6/27/2018 6:34 AM

This year I have been making a conscious effort to get better, and I need some advice.

I am struggling with fitness this year as I expected I would be. My question to all of you is; how long do you continue to push yourself even if you are exhausted? I keep hearing that seat time is one of the most important things you can do to continue to advance- and I definitely see that. But in my attempt to get more seat time, I begin to feel out of control as I get tired, which can't be benefiting me. I feel like I am learning a lot and getting much better already this year, but I definitely reach a point fairly quickly where I find myself dumping the bike in turns during the second half of the practice just from being too tired and out of focus to continue the pace I started at. So before I hurt myself, I usually call it and pack up and go home.

Is there anything I can do to safely add more seat time once I reach this point? Should I target certain sections and roll jumps when I am too tired? Should I be taking more breaks and riding shorter sessions? Should I just ride a very relaxed pace around the track? Or is what I am describing par for the course until my fitness levels increase?

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6/27/2018 6:38 AM

If you feel tired and out of control, get off the track and bike. You are a danger to yourself and others. Endurance and fitness come over time. If you absolutely HAVE to have more seat time, find a secluded field and set up some cones, practice braking drills and corners.

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6/27/2018 6:40 AM

RoflCopter726 wrote:

If you feel tired and out of control, get off the track and bike. You are a danger to yourself and others. Endurance and fitness come over time. If you absolutely HAVE to have more seat time, find a secluded field and set up some cones, practice braking drills and corners.

X2. If endurance is your problem figure out if its cardio related or strength related and improve it in the gym. Dont risk other peoples health by riding out of control

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6/27/2018 6:47 AM

Back it down and ride 80%. I normally still hit all the jumps and back it down in the straights and relax. I still focus on turns at normal pace as thats where you make or lose the most time. Cardio at the gym has helped the most for me. Find a gym with a row machine and go to town on that.

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2018 KTM 250sx
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6/27/2018 6:49 AM

It's not that I absolutely HAVE to have more seat time, but I really like riding my dirtbike and it's frustrating to call it quits before I am ready to. If I had access to an open field, I would be super happy to go out and ride a turn track until my arms fall off.

But I hear you, and completely agree. Safety is my number one priority. I am just wondering how other people handle this type of hurdle.

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6/27/2018 6:49 AM

I'm not sure if you history or physical condition, but if your having a hard time getting through second practice you need to work on cardio and some strength training during the week.

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-streets-

6/27/2018 6:50 AM
Edited Date/Time: 6/27/2018 6:53 AM

I am never breathing hard. I guess I need more strength.

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6/27/2018 6:52 AM

Get off the track. Build your stamina off your bike.

When your energy is depleted, you're just a danger to yourself and everyone else around you.

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6/27/2018 7:32 AM

Mental strength over comes physical weakness. You need to train your mind through endurance training off the bike. Running and rowing I have found are the best training off the bike. A lot of people say cycling because its a lot easier on your knee's. With rowing, running, cycling, you are forced into learning how to monitor and control your breathing, which leads into unconscious automatic breathing under load (on the bike). Wear a heart rate monitor and gradually increase your intervals and monitor yourself.

Apply the same thing on the bike. When you recognize you're getting tired back it off a little bit. Go down to 75-80% and try to maintain that as long as possible. When you get your wind back try to push back up gradually and then back it back down to 75-80%.

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6/27/2018 8:12 AM

I definitely struggle with fitness - especially when I ride my 250 2 stroke. When I get tired, my lap times aren't as good because I'm backing it down a bit and making sure that I'm still riding in a controlled manner, holding my line and maintaining good form. I just don't twist the throttle quite as much, and concentrate on riding smooth. If you can ride smooth, you also won't get as tired, and you have a better chance of maintaining a reasonable pace without being out of control and becoming a danger to yourself and others. I find I'm better off riding a smooth moto all the way through than riding like a lunatic for a few laps and then struggling to hold on. When I practice, I concentrate on form and technique more than speed, since if you improve those, speed will improve naturally. Also, positioning on the bike is important. If you're just holding on with your arms you're going to tire yourself out quickly. Use your legs to grip the bike too, and keep a good center of balance, leaning into acceleration so that you don't have to hold on so hard. I'm sure others have more experience and knowledge than me. These are just a few ways that I compensate for my physical shortcomings and still have fun and ride safe.

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Current rides: 2016 KTM 250SXF, 2017 KTM 350SXF

6/27/2018 8:20 AM

introduce yourself to a good crossfit box.. i have been training at a crossfit box for about 4 months, i went from being dog tired after 15mins of riding at speed, to now i can ride for 30-45mins without being beat at the end. granted im not the fastest kid at the track, but i can usually hold my own. im not sure where i run, im guessing higher end of 25+C, possibly B. i can run OTHG Support races in expert and do really well.

Last week i rode for an hour straight :D at Milestone MX on the main track.

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6/27/2018 8:41 AM

RoflCopter726 wrote:

If you feel tired and out of control, get off the track and bike. You are a danger to yourself and others. Endurance and fitness come over time. If you absolutely HAVE to have more seat time, find a secluded field and set up some cones, practice braking drills and corners.

This...

My brother and I were riding last August on a small track. He is a middle aged beginner who was just starting to jump some of the small obstacles. It was hot, and we were tired, and we went out for one more set of laps. Brother was tired enough that he quit standing up over the jumps. Result was he got bucked over the bars on a set of small doubles, and came down with a bad case of whiskey throttle. End result was 3 surgeries and titanium hardware in his wrist, hand and face.

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6/27/2018 8:53 AM

Its a fine line. And you have to consciously evaluate yourself. Yes, when I get tired, esp beginning of the season, I try and ride longer and longer to get my fitness back. But you have to slow down, take a few minute break. Etc. once you get sloppy it’s time to sit a few minutes out. Conversely, after you’ve done this a few times for the day and you’re smoked, even if there is plenty of day light left, go home. Come back safely to fight another day.

Get in the gym.

Evaluate your bike set up too. What’s beating you up? Suspension settings, Bar position, bar bend, even grip choice comes in the play.

Rotate your toes in, forcing you to squeeze the bike.

Get in the gym.

Enter some events too. There are times when I can’t sprint five minutes in the sand And others where we ride for a few hours with little to no stopping in single track. Diversify your riding portfolio. You don’t need to always sprint mx. Seat time can be beneficial off road too. Being good at one makes you better at the other, sometimes.

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6/27/2018 9:01 AM

No advice, just offering that its normal. You'll have to learn how to back it down to recover. But there is only so much you can do at the gym. I can run several miles and run up flights of stairs at work without breathing hard, etc..., but still get wiped out when riding. More seat time does help, you'll just have to work through it and learn how to adapt and how to gain strength.

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6/27/2018 10:18 AM

RoflCopter726 wrote:

If you feel tired and out of control, get off the track and bike. You are a danger to yourself and others. Endurance and fitness come over time. If you absolutely HAVE to have more seat time, find a secluded field and set up some cones, practice braking drills and corners.

What he said!

Start out slower for the first couple laps and build speed for the particular moto. Decide how long you are going to ride each moto, ride in a way that you can actually make it that long with your fastest lap on the last lap!

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6/27/2018 10:18 AM

Oh and dope all u want you don’t have to pass any drug tests smile

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6/27/2018 10:55 AM

Definitely get off the track. Go practice turns on a figure-8 somewhere. (Which, by the way, is NEVER a waste of time!)

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6/27/2018 11:24 AM

RoflCopter726 wrote:

If you feel tired and out of control, get off the track and bike. You are a danger to yourself and others. Endurance and fitness come over time. If you absolutely HAVE to have more seat time, find a secluded field and set up some cones, practice braking drills and corners.

Exactly.

I found a area near my house where i made basically a turn track with one tiny jump and i just rode that tell i couldnt hang on. That way if you crash its not life threatening.

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6/27/2018 12:24 PM
Edited Date/Time: 6/27/2018 12:28 PM

AJ565 wrote:

Back it down and ride 80%. I normally still hit all the jumps and back it down in the straights and relax. I still focus on turns at normal pace as thats where you make or lose the most time. Cardio at the gym has helped the most for me. Find a gym with a row machine and go to town on that.

X2... Back it down to a more in control level and keep riding.
My secret to getting rid of arm pump was at the beginning of the season I would ride as hard as I could until my arms were so pumped up I could hardly hang on and the I would back it down and ride 15-20 more laps. Then I would go ride again and I would be over arm pump for the rest of the season.

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Ed Johnson

6/27/2018 12:40 PM

Life hack - cocaine.

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6/27/2018 12:42 PM

Practice standing up at your balance point. Trials riding helps develop bike skills that help in the long run, then pin it and pray for as long as you can, and then go into saviour mode. Riding school perhaps?

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6/27/2018 12:53 PM

How much seat time are you talking before getting exhausted? 10 minutes into the first moto??? At then end of your 4th 30 minute moto?

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6/27/2018 1:01 PM

Solidkm wrote:

Life hack - cocaine.

thanks for that nugget kemosabe.

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6/27/2018 1:03 PM

Seat time is what you need, I can rin for 2hrs with at heart rate over 160bpm no worries. And I go alright in weights and kickboxing too. But 10 minutes on a mx track and I am struggling, I only get about 2hrs riding a month in at the moment though.

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6/27/2018 1:07 PM

RoflCopter726 wrote:

If you feel tired and out of control, get off the track and bike. You are a danger to yourself and others. Endurance and fitness come over time. If you absolutely HAVE to have more seat time, find a secluded field and set up some cones, practice braking drills and corners.

This a thousand times over. Sometimes I find that I can back in down for a lap or two and regain my composure for a few more laps.

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2017 RMZ450
2005 YZ250-sold :,(
1998 YZ250
2005 KX250F

80% of the time it works every time
IG @hammerfamily_4 & @2HRacing
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6/27/2018 1:22 PM

Back it down but keep on riding. Don't worry if you're are slower, most everyone will be 6 laps onwards.

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6/27/2018 2:23 PM

I would say I am comfortable riding three 15 minute motos with 10-15 minute breaks in between. Then towards the end of the 3rd, I catch myself making mistakes. Midway through the 4th moto is usually when I call it because I think I am losing control. Each day is a little bit different- but this is where I am at currently.

I really do appreciate the input from the various levels of riders. So far this is the advice I have gathered:

- get off the track if I feel out of control at all
- slow my pace to ride longer
- focus on riding smooth
- ride a turn track
- join a gym (row machine sounds popular)
- cocaine

I wish there were more turn tracks around me, I would definitely be taking advantage of them. I only have access to motocross tracks. I would kill for a secluded field I could ride on my own.

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6/27/2018 2:26 PM

An interesting side note that wildbill brings up- if I can afford it, are riding schools worth it? I am finally at a point in life where financial reasons aren't really holding me back from riding. Any notable ones in the Northeast U.S.?

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6/27/2018 3:34 PM

Are you eating and drinking enough at the track between motos? I started packing a few snacks other than my basic lunch like grapes banana nuts cheese and Jerky I find I can ride almost all day since I started doing that.

Also when you do find yourself out there making mistakes and feeling tired just back it Down to the control zone and concentrate on being smooth and keeping good technique. the last thing you want to do is yard yourself and end up riding the couch for a month or 6. Maybe do drills at the end of the day to keep on the bike without feeling the need to go full on hammer time

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6/27/2018 3:39 PM

Wiztardo wrote:

An interesting side note that wildbill brings up- if I can afford it, are riding schools worth it? I am finally at a point in life where financial reasons aren't really holding me back from riding. Any notable ones in the Northeast U.S.?

I imagine they would help quite a bit I recently started riding with someone that’s a good bit quicker than me and already have noticed a pretty big difference in my riding and have also kind of thought about taking a class just because I never have. It would be a cool experience I say go for it

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